Contrary Opinion | How Sentiment Analysis & Text Analytics Mesh

Why Sentiment Analysis Doesn't Depend on Text Analytics

Seth Grimes
1/23/2012  
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Seth Grimes
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Re: Potential
Seth Grimes   1/29/2012 9:27:42 PM
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Joe, you're right.

Another example: Arguably Net Promoter is a form of sentiment analysis.

Joe Stanganelli
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Re: Fair enough but...
Joe Stanganelli   1/29/2012 8:42:42 PM
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I'm partial to D major, myself.  ;)

Joe Stanganelli
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Potential
Joe Stanganelli   1/29/2012 8:40:39 PM
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Thanks for this important reminder, Seth, that -- although it's the first thing many think about when sentimental analysis comes to mind -- text and linguistic sentiment analysis are not the only kind there are.

Even something as simple as a rating on a scale of one to five stars is sentiment analysis.

And video analytics do indeed hold a great deal of promise for companies like retailers -- as they measure customer reactions to displays, sales techniques, and so on.

There is a huge, untapped pool of potential for sentiment analysis -- limited only by what people can innovate.

impactnow
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Sentiment with rules
impactnow   1/27/2012 11:34:14 AM
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It's an interesting idea should there be "rules" that assure easier interpretation in social media or does this defeat the purpose of free expression?

John Barnes
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Re: Fair enough but...
John Barnes   1/26/2012 11:46:13 AM
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Beth, Shawn,

A logical category (or logical type) is a set of things on which all the same operations are meaningful (even if the operation is highly improbable or the meaning can't be observed in the real world). 

Eggs, elephants, and electrons are all in the same logical category because they are physical objects we can detect, even if we would find it hard to fry an elephant, impossible to fry an electron, and unlikely to repel an elephant with a charged plate; all those things "mean" something even if the something isn't possible. (Notice that you can picture them mentally even though you know they're impossible.)

Cheese and Wednesday are in different logical categories; you can't picture digesting Wednesday or putting off a meeting till cheese, and "it rained on cheese" means something completely different from "it rained on Wednesday."

So what I'm saying is that tweets, blog posts, emails, notes tied to bricks, billboards, etc. are in one logical category, whereas enthymemes like comparison, reciprocity, dissociation, etc. are in another, and they are as different as cheese and Wednesday.

That's not to say they don't interact (you can deliver cheese on Wednesday), and for example a sustained metaphor like "God the Father" in the New Testament or like Hamlet's constant comparison of his mother to animals would be hard to do in a single tweet (and would mean something different if you did).  There's probably a minimum amount of room for an enthymeme that is developed to one extent or another.  That's one way in which Twitter's constraints make it an easier place to study what people are saying: they can't be saying anything as profound as the Bible or Shakespeare because the enthymemes won't fit.  On the other hand, enthymemes tend to be hologrammatic -- you can miss pieces of them and still get the idea, but the fewer pieces you miss, the more accurate your impression is.  So when you force the tweeters to throw away so many pieces of what they are thinking, you also make the enthymemes fuzzier, vaguer, and harder to discern. 

As for my favorite enthymeme, that's a bit like asking a musician his favorite chord.  All depends where it is and what it's used for.  And I tend to agree with C.S. Peirce that logic is everywhere; there's vast amounts of it in Twitter, and pretty much everywhere, actually.

BethSchultz
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Re: Fair enough but...
BethSchultz   1/26/2012 9:38:33 AM
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Well, I was being tongue-and-cheek, but as always I enjoy your answers -- and this one leads me to two new questions. 1) You say, "I think the tweet is in a different category, logically," does that mean to suggest that you feel there IS logic to be applied to the twitterverse? 2) Just out of curious, and because you clearly so love language and its constructs, what's your favorite enthymemes?

Shawn Hessinger
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Re: Fair enough but...
Shawn Hessinger   1/25/2012 11:39:57 PM
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Interesting. Can you elaborate?

John Barnes
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Re: Fair enough but...
John Barnes   1/25/2012 11:32:29 PM
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I think that is a classic "or" question that can be answered with "yes."  I.e. sometimes one, sometimes the other, it depends.

Shawn Hessinger
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Re: Fair enough but...
Shawn Hessinger   1/25/2012 11:30:58 PM
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John and Beth,

This discussion is fascinating. From a sentiment analysis point of view, I do wonder whether Twitter's constraints make it better or worse tool for gathering participant moods

John Barnes
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Re: Fair enough but...
John Barnes   1/25/2012 10:07:03 PM
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I think the tweet is in a different category, logically, Beth; you could express any of the enthymemes in a tweet, at least sketchily. A tweet is more like a haiku, sonnet, or limerick: a few strict rules and a bunch of surrounding customs.  (E.g. limericks are rarely used for funeral odes, and Petrarchian sonnets usually begin with an observation and slide into a comment, but it would still be a limerick or sonnet if you broke the custom.  But four lines of iambic trimeter is not a limerick and ten rhyming couplets is not a sonnet).  Some enthymemes definitely tweet easier than others, but I think that's custom. 

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