Supporting Opinion | Code or GUI

GUI Schmooey ‒ You Need to Know Code!

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aaphil
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Re: Architecture for the long term
aaphil   4/7/2012 11:02:48 AM
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True. I guess the main crux of the argument is based on who you ask and their responsibilities within the project or implementation (mostly how difficult their role becomes).

Shawn Hessinger
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Re: Architecture for the long term
Shawn Hessinger   4/6/2012 3:25:43 PM
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Hi aaphil,

I commented on your remarks in the counterpoint stream as well. In short, I agree with you and think this holds true for lots of things in life. Solutions need not be mutually exclusive and at times a solution is good enough to move forward with, no matter how strongly some might argue for a perfect solution instead.

aaphil
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Re: Architecture for the long term
aaphil   3/31/2012 5:33:57 PM
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They don't have to be mutually exclusive. In some instances, it works. Some IDE's make it a good starting point with the GUI then the back end coding to advance.

Maryam@Impact
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Re: Architecture for the long term
Maryam@Impact   3/31/2012 5:21:43 PM
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Exactly there is a big difference between what looks good and what will actually work.

Hospice_Houngbo
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Re: Architecture for the long term
Hospice_Houngbo   3/31/2012 2:14:18 PM
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If you are a developer you do need to know programming and coding, but if you are just an end-user, you can interact with the application via a GUI user interface. An advanced uer can also customize the application via an API (Application Programming Interface), but I don't think that we could expect that from everybody. 

Maryam@Impact
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Architecture for the long term
Maryam@Impact   3/30/2012 11:26:13 PM
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I agree GUI is great for the demo but it rarely can be scaled for mass usage.

 

 

 

kicheko
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Re: Understand The Code and It's Implications
kicheko   3/30/2012 5:44:55 AM
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I'll add my voice on the middle-ground idea. But the middle should lean towards code side. It is a bad thing to learn to rely on point and click for major system architecture. It is similar to building a house with a weak foundation. You cannot even embed security mechanisms in the code when using GUI alone. Not to mention the basics like troubleshooting, which has a close limit when using point and click. My take: Work with code mostly...use GUI to connect the point to the less tech oriented members of the BI team.

Maryam@Impact
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Re: Code and GUI
Maryam@Impact   3/28/2012 12:22:42 PM
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Chad I agree that architecture is key to scalable solutions and solutions that can grow to meet the ever changing needs of users, its part and parcel of that marriage that is so elusive.

Louis Watson
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Re: Understand The Code and It's Implications
Louis Watson   3/27/2012 10:20:28 PM
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I really like Maryam's position on this and I think from a pragmatic view it is probably the best choice.  Really not necessary to sit on both ends of the extremes.  Those who prefer GUI's should at some point take an interest in coding and the code itself.  I am sure packages offer all sorts of little utitilies that only coding would make possible and the converse could be argued for a purely coding approach - a GUI will be necessary for those less skilled at understanding code.  So Maryam position is probably what will be the case in most cases.


Shawn Hessinger
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Re: Understand The Code and It's Implications
Shawn Hessinger   3/27/2012 9:56:30 PM
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Hi Louis,

What do you think about Maryam's middle ground between GUI and coding?

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