Beth Schultz

UT System Makes Data Transparent & Visual

NO RATINGS
1 saves
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Noreen Seebacher
User Rank
Blogger
Re: impressive
Noreen Seebacher   5/7/2013 7:52:49 AM
NO RATINGS
It seems like everyone - colleges, bankers, college financing counselors -- profit at the expense of students

SethBreedlove
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: impressive
SethBreedlove   5/7/2013 1:32:26 AM
NO RATINGS
What really doesn't make sense is the government loaning out government money for student loans, but fees and interest going to 3rd party service companies. 

If I'm going to pay fees, I'd rather have it go back to the government than a 3rd party shareholder. 

I believe if there was more transparency, a lot of middle men would dissapear. 

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Re: impressive
BethSchultz   5/6/2013 9:08:19 AM
NO RATINGS
 Higher ed funding is yet another example of a broken system for the most part. As the experts say, this country is heading for a student debt crisis much like the mortgage bust. Scary stuff.

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Re: impressive
BethSchultz   5/6/2013 9:05:59 AM
NO RATINGS
It's so absurb I have to wonder why the government even bothers.

Noreen Seebacher
User Rank
Blogger
Re: impressive
Noreen Seebacher   5/5/2013 11:33:35 PM
NO RATINGS
We should abolish federal aid. If everyone gets $5,500 from the federal government in the form of a Liam, colleges just increase tuition accordingly. If we ended the government loan program then schools would have to reconsider these exorbitant tuition costs because fewer students would be able to afford it

SethBreedlove
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: impressive
SethBreedlove   5/5/2013 6:43:22 PM
NO RATINGS
I was awarded a few scholarships, it helped, but just a little. 

The average student loan debt is about $25,000 for four years.  For independent students, that also pay living expenses, that amount can be much, much higher. 

Also, what is missing in these figures are credit card debt.  The average student has around $4000 in credit card debt on top of the student loans. However, that amount is actually much higher, because many students also have non-student credit cards.

I would like to see University costs more transparent. Universities are a complex bureaucracy and it is easy to hide costs or bloat budgets. 

Noreen Seebacher
User Rank
Blogger
Re: impressive
Noreen Seebacher   5/4/2013 12:27:27 AM
NO RATINGS
The EFC is a ridiculous arbitrary number that in no way reflects what a family can actually afford. Essentially if it is higher than 5500, you get little or nothing!

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Re: impressive
BethSchultz   5/3/2013 1:13:32 PM
NO RATINGS
I heard a rather appalling story last evening having to due with the cost of college attendance. For one family in my daughter's high school, the estimated family contribution (EFC)  kicked out through the FAFSA app was $92,000, presumably because the family had some investments and owned some property -- but nothing they could use to pay tuition without severe penalty and long-term ramifications. The father has been out of work for two years, mind you, so they've suffered major loss of income and this app was for the oldest of 4 kids. Anyways, she was accepted to a prestigious, well-endowed college in the midwest but, naturally with an EFC of $92,000, received no financial support from the institution (or any other). The parents went to talk to the financial advisors there and were told the best the school could do was arrange for an invitation to an alumni cocktail party. Essentially the idea was they would bring the daughter and shop her around, pitching her to wealthy alums who would then fork over scholarship money in her name. 

Now I don't know this family that well, and have no idea on well or not financially situated they are. I do know from experience that the FAFSA EFC in no way mirrors a true assessment of the amount a family can reasonably afford. Regardless, the idea that a school would suggest a potential student go pimp herself to alumni is really appalling to me. 

Isn't it the college's job to seek donors and award accordingly based on academic merit and/or financial need?

That they can get away with doing this sort of stuff is so obnoxious. Worse yet, I'm sure the school is sitting on a mountain of endowments. Urr.

 

 

 

Jeff
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: impressive
Jeff   5/3/2013 12:58:02 PM
NO RATINGS
Yeah 25000 sounds right.  That is too expensive though.  I believe the college system is broken.  I hope the bubble bursts before mine get there.

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Re: impressive
BethSchultz   5/2/2013 9:19:07 AM
NO RATINGS
Hi Jeff -- this blog definitely glosses over the fact that Huie and her team built a centralized data warehouse for bringing all of the UT System disparate data into one place. That was no small feat, to be sure. I definitely have more good stuff on this implementation to share in future blogs! 

As for college debt, I can tell you with the experience of having twin daughters just having gone through the application/acceptance/financial aid offer/commitment process, that kids offered and accepting federal direct subsidized and unsubsidized loans should expect to be around $25,000 in debt after four years. 

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Information Resources
More Blogs from Beth Schultz
It's been a fun three years, but now it's time to say goodbye.
Take inspiration from Christopher Columbus as you pursue your analytical journeys.
The "big" in big data is no reflection of the size of the organization embracing its potential.
Whether you're an undergrad, a graduate student, or an analytics professional already, the same best-practices advice lives large.
Satellite data can help solve puzzles, from the lofty to the mundane.
Radio Show
Radio Shows
UPCOMING
James M. Connolly
Analytics: Your Defense Against Cyber Threats


5/27/2015   REGISTER   0
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Big Data & Big Pharma: How Analytics Might Save Your Life


5/19/2015  LISTEN   37
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Live Interviews From SAS Global Forum


4/28/2015  LISTEN   11
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How to Hire Great Analytics Talent


4/23/2015  LISTEN   51
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Sports Analytics Mean Fun and Business


3/24/2015  LISTEN   4
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Secure Your Big Data in the Cloud


2/26/2015  LISTEN   114
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Make It Big As a Data Scientist in 2015


2/11/2015  LISTEN   106
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Big Data, Decisions & the Simulated Experience


2/3/2015  LISTEN   87
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
A Chat About Big Data, Machine Learning & Value


1/15/2015  LISTEN   125
ARCHIVE
Curtis Franklin Jr.
An Infrastructure for Analytics


12/18/2014  LISTEN   63
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Prepare for the Internet of Things Data Blitz


12/16/2014  LISTEN   51
Information Resources
Quick Poll
Quick Poll
Infographic
Infographic
It Pays to Keep Insurance Fraud in Check
While 97% of insurers say that insurance fraud has increased or remained the same in the past two years, most of those companies report benefits from anti-fraud technology in limiting the impact of fraud, including higher quality referrals, the ability to uncover organized fraud, and improve efficiency for investigators.
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on Twitter
Like us on Facebook
Like us on Facebook
About Us  |  Contact Us  |  Help  |  Register  |  Twitter  |  Facebook  |  RSS