Beth Schultz

Shell Taps Big-Data From Way Down Deep

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 2
BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Sure about this?
BethSchultz   9/18/2013 12:11:15 PM
NO RATINGS
@Phoenix, deepwater activities are fascinating, aren't they? I think because we simply can't imagine what it'd be like to live in that world! I will definitely share more, not only on the data and the analytics but also on the culture hurdles. Stay tuned!

Phoenix
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: Sure about this?
Phoenix   9/17/2013 11:56:21 PM
NO RATINGS
It is really fascinating to find out more about how they use models and analytics to process data and predict things. I have always wondered how the industry operated. Specially the deep sea oil drilling. I look forward to your next articles on Shell.

PredictableChaos
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: Sure about this?
PredictableChaos   9/17/2013 5:15:56 PM
NO RATINGS
 

It's a quote, so now that it's correct, there's not much else to do with it.

Under 3000 feet of water and then 5000 feet of rock, the point is the same - the action is only accessible with instrumentation. No diver can 'see' what's going on. If something is amiss, we have to figure it out with the data and patterns in data.

PC

mg237
User Rank
Prospector
Re: Sure about this?
mg237   9/17/2013 12:39:36 PM
NO RATINGS
Even that sounds excessive. Most wells in the Gulf of Mexico for example are in water depths of 5,000 feet or so. Sure the wells are deeper, but even at 20,000 to 30,000 feet. Does it really make sense to say "10s of thousands of feet?"

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Sure about this?
BethSchultz   9/17/2013 12:28:44 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, thank you, that was an error. Should have been "feet," as it now should read, not "miles." 

mg237
User Rank
Prospector
Sure about this?
mg237   9/17/2013 12:19:40 PM
NO RATINGS
I think there may be an error here. "Tens of thousadns of miles?" Back in 2009, the Deepwater Horizon crew drilled the deepest oil and gas well in the world (Macondo). And that only had a vertical depth of 35,050 ft., or more than six miles.

<<   <   Page 2 / 2
Information Resources
More Blogs from Beth Schultz
It's been a fun three years, but now it's time to say goodbye.
Take inspiration from Christopher Columbus as you pursue your analytical journeys.
The "big" in big data is no reflection of the size of the organization embracing its potential.
Whether you're an undergrad, a graduate student, or an analytics professional already, the same best-practices advice lives large.
Satellite data can help solve puzzles, from the lofty to the mundane.
Radio Show
Radio Shows
UPCOMING
James M. Connolly
Hire and Manage a Great Analytics Team


9/1/2015   REGISTER   1
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Use Mobile Analytics to See the Big Picture


8/26/2015  LISTEN   83
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Survive the Digital Transformation


8/18/2015  LISTEN   85
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Health Analytics: Find Data Beyond the Hospital Doors


7/28/2015  LISTEN   47
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Finding Answers Through Prescriptive Analytics


7/21/2015  LISTEN   117
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Visualization: How to Bring Data to Life


6/22/2015  LISTEN   55
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Learn Why Analytics Are at Home in the Cloud


6/15/2015  LISTEN   26
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Analytics: Your Defense Against Cyber Threats


5/27/2015  LISTEN   60
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Big Data & Big Pharma: How Analytics Might Save Your Life


5/19/2015  LISTEN   37
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Live Interviews From SAS Global Forum


4/28/2015  LISTEN   11
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How to Hire Great Analytics Talent


4/23/2015  LISTEN   51
Information Resources
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on Twitter
Quick Poll
Quick Poll
Like us on Facebook
Like us on Facebook
About Us  |  Contact Us  |  Help  |  Register  |  Twitter  |  Facebook  |  RSS