Beth Schultz

Advice From a Health IT 'Data Ferret'

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BethSchultz
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Re: Ferreting for the business
BethSchultz   5/27/2014 4:47:21 PM
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I think you mean support that deliverable, Maryam!

Maryam@Impact
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Re: Ferreting for the business
Maryam@Impact   5/27/2014 1:25:53 PM
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That I think the problem surfaces in the analytics process. Researchers are intrinsically curious that often piques your interest and can leave them into other hypotheses. The challenge is to ensure that these hypotheses will benefit the business and not just provide additional information. There's a fine line between being knowledgeable and providing useful information that drives revenue. I find one of the best techniques is to storyboard your final report to a sure the analysis you are performing will support that undeliverable .

BethSchultz
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Re: Ferreting for the business
BethSchultz   5/21/2014 8:14:56 AM
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Hi Maryam, so... what's typically the first sign that you're going in the wrong direction with the data you're collecting or thinking about collecting? And, how do you stop yourself from collecting it anyways, even if not for the current business goal. Don't you face the temptation to collect it anyways in case you might need it for another purpose... eventually?

Maryam@Impact
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Ferreting for the business
Maryam@Impact   5/20/2014 10:19:05 PM
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I too am in recovery it's a lifelong process for the curios. I love to know more but now balance it with what will actually move a business decision and impact the business. If the ferreting is not in line with these goals I step away and reappraise what data I really need to impact the business. We used to call it suffering from analysis paralysis in my early days. Its the difference between need to know and nice to know.

CandidoNick
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Re: Privacy surprises
CandidoNick   5/18/2014 7:00:53 PM
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And by that token, we're also seeing a rise in paranoia over the past 2 decades. We're scared of everything. 20-somethings grew up in an age where they were being told to be cautious of everything, and a small way to rebel may be to brush health insurance in wake of some "real" problems.

PredictableChaos
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Re: Privacy surprises
PredictableChaos   5/15/2014 7:41:45 PM
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I agree with Phoenix and kq4ym - young people have no reason to share lots of information with health care providers. They're all going to live forever, right? Just ask them and they'll tell you.

20-somethings are dealing with a lot of new worries - student loan payments, buying cars, paying the rent/mortgage. Health topics fall somewhere after life insurance and retirement planning, which aren't getting much mindshare either.

Louis Watson
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Re: Privacy surprises
Louis Watson   5/15/2014 7:15:29 PM
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Are older people more willing to trust their providers and share data with them because they'll potentially benefit from the analytics? Or do you think they're more naturally distrustful?

 

 

@Beth I would think they are naturally more distrustful. The more wisdom and experience one has leads to skepticism on just about every topic.

Ok, In my case it does ! : ) 

Louis Watson
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Re: Privacy surprises
Louis Watson   5/15/2014 7:10:17 PM
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"...I say trust. Do I trust that this pharmacy or this hospital or this medical practice is going to use my data for my benefit? "


@PC    Good point. Do I trust them ? No.   Why should I ?

Louis Watson
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The Cost of Data Collection
Louis Watson   5/15/2014 7:08:10 PM
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While I respect Mr. Mostashari's love of data.  He does not seem to be much concerned with the cost of storage or the safeguarding of it.  

I am sure these are considerations but when collecting data for data's sake - one needs to keep these things in mind as well.

kq4ym
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Re: Privacy surprises
kq4ym   5/15/2014 2:07:21 PM
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The younger folks also have the belief that they're healthy and going to live "foreever" so there's not a lot of movement towards visiting health care providers. While, the older adults have felt the pains of time creeping more frequently into their lives. In the end, the technology is certainly going to show some amazing improvements in the system over time.

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