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Beth Schultz

Being a Great Analyst, Even as an Introvert

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BethSchultz
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Re: Extroverts and Cold Showers
BethSchultz   8/13/2014 10:09:26 AM
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Interesting, @magneticnorth. I've not run into this businessballs.com site before -- but have bookmarked it now. I think it's incumbent upon business professionals, especially managers but also anybody working in collaborative environments, to recognize personality type and how that affects how a person approaches assignments and deals with others. But, as you note, oversimplification (or stereotyping) can be a challenge -- a pretty big one, too, since lots of people aren't going to want to do more than a cursory read on personality.

magneticnorth
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Re: Extroverts and Cold Showers
magneticnorth   8/12/2014 10:44:33 PM
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@Beth If you'd like to understand Jung's framework, I recommend reading the Jung section of this page. It's a lot to digest, but it's thorough enough to do Jung justice. That's the beauty of his typing method, in my opinion: it helps us understand people through type without oversimplifying them. It allows for classification but also accommodates variety in growth stages, environments, personal decisions, etc.

magneticnorth
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Re: Introvert department
magneticnorth   8/12/2014 9:57:41 AM
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@Jamescon Getting something done and done well are decisions that one has to make. A J may very well slack off as the P delivers the output speedily. Like Beth wrote, we're talking about tendencies here. The J simply tends to yearn for closure while the P seeks to explore. Any mature individual, whether J or P, will be able to distinguish when it's best to keep exploring and when it's time to put one's foot down. The resulting dynamics of tendencies and decisions make the workplace a very colorful one indeed!

Jamescon
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Re: Introvert department
Jamescon   8/12/2014 8:43:07 AM
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@magneticnorth. Actually, if I recall right, the Perceivers still get the job done (by deadline and well), just not with the same planned approach that the J's take. Right?

BethSchultz
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Re: Introvert department
BethSchultz   8/11/2014 9:20:39 AM
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@tinym -- is that to say, then, that you guys were able to identify fairly easily what sort of person, introversion/extroversion wise, you were interviewing? 

BethSchultz
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Re: Extroverts and Cold Showers
BethSchultz   8/11/2014 9:16:27 AM
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@magneticnorth -- thanks for sharing more on Jung's introversion-extroversion theory. I've not read on the topic other than in Quiet, so this is all fascinating to me. 

Ariella
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Re: Introvert department
Ariella   8/11/2014 8:39:46 AM
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@magneticnorth fascinating, so the P people go after the shiny and new but aren't really reliable. I'm definitely in the J group.

magneticnorth
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Re: Extroverts and Cold Showers
magneticnorth   8/11/2014 2:13:43 AM
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@Beth Under Jung's framework, a person not only has one cognitive function, but FOUR. Each of these alternate in terms of introversion and extroversion. For example, I'm an INTJ, and my functions are Ni (introverted intuition), Te (extroverted thinking), Fi (introverted feeling), and Se (extroverted sensing). I won't go into what each of those mean, but suffice it to say that each person has a built-in mix of introverted functions (how you deal with yourself) and extroverted functions (how you deal with the outside world). What makes an introvert and an extrovert is the primary function. Mine, for example, is introverted intuition, so I'm an introvert. I use introverted intuition the most and have used it since birth. What happens to the other three? For a person to mature, he has to develop the succeeding functions, especially the second one. It's how one attains a basic balance between the inner world and the outer world. So, a mature individual, whether he be an introvert or an extrovert, should be able to comfortably dwell in his inner world and interact with others. The difference is that introverts rest by being alone and extroverts rest by going to a party.

If a person does not develop the second function in due time, he develops a "loop" between the primary and tertiary functions, which are either both introverted or both extroverted. An introvert who's in a loop will be closed in on himself, while an extrovert will always be swayed by the rest of the world. There's a personality disorder for each type of loop.

magneticnorth
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Re: Introvert department
magneticnorth   8/11/2014 1:49:06 AM
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@Jamescon yes! You're referring to the last pair, the J (Judger) and P (Perceiver). The Js get things done. The Ps like new things, but they usually don't get done.

magneticnorth
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Re: Speak up, the new Quick Poll
magneticnorth   8/11/2014 1:44:51 AM
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Under Jung's framework, the types that hit it off easily are, indeed, opposites. They tend to click because they find each other's worlds fascinating. But not all opposites are created equal. The ones that work are extroverts and introverts of the same cognitive function, e.g. an extroverted thinker and an introverted thinker. We only have to look at our office or our neighborhood to find opposites that don't attract. Usually, that would be the opposite cognitive function, e.g. an introverted intuitive and an extroverted sensor. That's me and a former boss right there ;)

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