Thomas Redman

Garbage in, Garbage out: What It Means for Big-Data Quality

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BethSchultz
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Re: Quality personnel
BethSchultz   8/13/2012 10:50:15 AM
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Seth, and let's not forget that S&P $2 trillion error from last year! I don't know if we can link that to spreadsheets, but certainly there was a data quality issue there with widespread ramifications.

Alexis
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Re: Quality personnel
Alexis   8/13/2012 9:57:59 AM
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The potential errors are mind-boggling, especially from companies that should know better. (ie, a company that specializes in metrics that apparently did not realize how excel truncates numbers after a certain number of digits. yes, this really happened.)

Noreen Seebacher
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Re: Quality personnel
Noreen Seebacher   8/13/2012 9:46:43 AM
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I'm apprehensive about the numbers of companies that still rely on spreadsheets -- and the potential errors created from less than adequaltely treined employees who use them

SethBreedlove
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Re: Quality personnel
SethBreedlove   8/12/2012 2:30:29 AM
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@ Beth, that's a good question. Big data could lead to big errors.   The more data there is the more potential.  For example, audits of financial instituations can have tens of millions of spread sheets , which any one could have an error.  In Oct, 2011, the German government announced it  €55bn richer after an accountancy error undervalued assets at the state-owned mortgage lender Hypo Real Estate. It was due to a sum being entered twice. 

Richard Cuthbert, CEO of UK outsourcing specialist Mouchel, stepped down after a spreadsheet-based accounting error reduced Mouchel's full-year profits by more than £8.5 million to below £6 million.   Ooops! 

With these spreadsheets being connected to various data bases, a simple error can spread like wild fire. 

BethSchultz
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Quality personnel
BethSchultz   8/10/2012 10:13:06 AM
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Hi Tom. I'm wondering what you see internally these days relative to how companies handle  data quality and how that might change as big-data comes into play. Do you see distinct data quality groups set up? If not, do you think such would be a necessity going forward?

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