Joe Stanganelli

Three Little Tricks for Boosting Survey Effectiveness

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SethBreedlove
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Re: Survey effectiveness
SethBreedlove   10/20/2011 8:33:08 PM
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It's true, there are many surveys that are not coded properly. 

Regarding the 'Eradicate middle ground' section is the blog, this is especially important due to diverse cultures.  Some cultures are inclined to say things are okay because they tend to understate the negative when giving the option.  

Michelle
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Re: *Re: *Re: data over time
Michelle   10/19/2011 5:57:17 PM
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It would be in a network's best interest to ask the right questions.  The right questions should include something about renewing for another season (as you stated before).  I can think of many shows that might have been renewed instead of cancelled if networks had the sense to ask the right questions of the right audience.  It seems so much is decided without bothering to check with the audience.  I know there must be more involved in these decisions but I can't help wondering what good could come from data gathered in a good survey.

Broadway0474
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Re: Survey effectiveness
Broadway0474   10/19/2011 2:29:54 PM
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@Maryam, can you give us an example or two (without naming names if you don't wan of course)?

impactnow
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Survey effectiveness
impactnow   10/19/2011 12:52:17 PM
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Joe Great points in today’s create a web surveys on the fly mentality you make and excellent point developing a great survey that yields meaningful results requires skill and understanding of research methods. Of late I am seeing so many bias developed surveys sent out it is very scary that companies are making decisions based on the results of these surveys that are obiviously very suspect.

Ariella
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Re: *Re: *Re: data over time
Ariella   10/19/2011 10:41:40 AM
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That takes a great deal of objectivity, Joe. Not everyone can distinguish between what they want to be true and what is true in a concrete sense.

Broadway0474
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Re: More specifics, fewer responses?
Broadway0474   10/18/2011 8:55:02 PM
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Shawn, to use your journalism analogy a bit more, it is common wisdom now that articles for the web ought to be shorter than what you might be able to get away with in print. Why? People tend to have shorter attention spans when reading online.

Joe Stanganelli
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Re: *Re: *Re: data over time
Joe Stanganelli   10/18/2011 3:57:14 PM
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Good point, Cordell.  I myself find myself, when responding to surveys, personality tests, and so on, having to step back and say to myself: "No, that's the answer I *want* to be true, but THIS is the true answer."

I also found myself in a similar situation earlier today.  I responded to a survey asking me about the most recent episode of House.  One of the questions asked, "How excited are you about watching this season of House?"  The choices were "Very Excited," "Somewhat Excited," and so on.  I couldn't decide between those choices, because "Very" seemed to overstate it, and "Somewhat" seemed to understate it.  Because "Very" was the most extreme answer, however, I was going to settle for "Somewhat."

Then I remembered that there is speculation that this season of House could be the last.  Because I would like to see the series keep going, I answered "Very excited," in fear of a less positive response being taken into account when Fox is deciding whether to renew the show.

In my case, my "adjusted" response was because Fox wasn't asking the right question: "How much would you miss this show if we didn't renew it?"

Joe Stanganelli
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Re: *Re: *Re: data over time
Joe Stanganelli   10/18/2011 3:52:07 PM
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No, by frequency, I mean/Doug Williamson means: "How often?" As in, "How often did the clerk provide masterful service? Always, Sometimes, Seldom, or Never."

The same question asked a different way could be useful -- Myers-Briggs and similar tests employs this method.  That said, it doesn't do anything to stave off response inflation.

Cordell
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Re: *Re: *Re: data over time
Cordell   10/18/2011 3:48:45 PM
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Another thought Joe since you're the expert on surveys!  I recently read several books on neuromarketing.  One in particular "How We Decide" by Jonah Lehrer suggests that when we respond to surveys we tend to overthink our answers and don't really respond truthfully.  Not the we intentionally are trying to be deceptive it's just that when we think about what we're thinking we're influenced by all kinds of exterior things.  We know what we want but we typically say otherwise.

Cordell
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Re: *Re: *Re: data over time
Cordell   10/18/2011 3:43:02 PM
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This is really interesting.  Joe, when you talk about frequency I assume you mean how many respondants answered a certain way.  What about multiple questions in the survey asked in different way to confirm preferences?  How common or useful is this?

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