Pierre DeBois

Don't Toss Excel Out Just Yet

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Pierre DeBois
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Long live Excel
Pierre DeBois   1/12/2012 10:12:31 AM
NO RATINGS
aaphril and Louis,

 

Thanks for the comments - it was probably a while before an Excel API could be considered.  Think about Microsoft and VBA as an example - they pulled VBA out of the Mac version for Excel, but placed it back again in the latest version. VBA is stilled used, but there were some limits in seeing its value.  Given that some businesses were storing data in Excel is revealing - it means that any sort of programming, VBA or API, was not given a due consideration.

Ariella
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Long live Excel
Ariella   1/12/2012 8:27:48 AM
NO RATINGS
@aaphil; @Louis Exactly!

Louis Watson
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Long live Excel
Louis Watson   1/12/2012 12:59:28 AM
NO RATINGS

No question Excel will continue to be vital to analyst of all skill sets and experience. As well it should be, it is a very powerful tool and still well worth learning.  

I agree with Ariella when she says that those who complain about Excel obviously don't know much about it.


aaphil
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Long live Excel
aaphil   1/11/2012 11:37:34 PM
NO RATINGS
Not to mention that many 'custom' solutions are built using the Excel API. So the native functionalities of the platform works for alot things, it's just a matter of knowing how to use it.

Shawn Hessinger
User Rank
Blogger
A question of flexibility
Shawn Hessinger   1/11/2012 10:19:24 PM
NO RATINGS
Pierre,

Excel remains a useful enough tool for working with data even if presentation and modeling tools change. In the end, I think it is a question of flexibility. If Excel remains easy to use in conjunction with other tools, I think it will remain an important tool in the foreseeable future.

Pierre DeBois
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Long live Excel
Pierre DeBois   1/11/2012 2:13:42 PM
NO RATINGS
Beth,

Per usual you get to core of it - cost can be a driver if something is familar and seems to be a nofix.  But what is slippery for many businesses is that they can become numbe to changes that could enhance a tool already used.  I mention Excel because it really was an eye openner as to how many analytic app for ti have been created, even for Excel for Mac.  And many small businesses are still learning how having familar software like accounting applications, project management applications, and email are on the cloud, so there is a convenience in delivering services not avialable before

Pierre DeBois
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Long live Excel
Pierre DeBois   1/11/2012 2:05:43 PM
NO RATINGS
Ariella,

Thanks for the post. Much of the difficult stems from using Excel as a data storage in some firms early on. I think most by know understand that there's Access. let along other databases that are better equipped for long-term data management.  But as I wrote, much of that overlook comes from misuse of what a spreadsheet can do.

Ariella
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Long live Excel
Ariella   1/11/2012 12:15:12 PM
NO RATINGS
On another board I participate in, I've seen many negative views of Excel. The posters indicate that the only way to go is to get custom software. But I question if they really know what Excel is capable of. Sure, if you buy the software specialized for your industry, it will seem to be the best choice, but many of the functions built into such programs are already available on Excel.

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Long live Excel
BethSchultz   1/11/2012 8:25:29 AM
NO RATINGS
Yesterday I posted a blog that talked, among other things, about the mainframe's lasting stature in the enterprise -- despite repeated doomsday predictions. Now I know Excel and mainframes are two highly different animals, but I think the point remains the same. I don't expect to see the end of the venerable spreadsheet any time soon in the enterprise. Yes, other business tools and more advanced analytics capabilities will supplement and complement Excel's use -- but from some folks, especially within companies creating a culture of data-driven decision-making, Excel will be a hanger-on. 

 

Information Resources
More Blogs from Pierre DeBois
Amazon’s emphasis on the Internet of Things in its strategic moves demonstrates how web analytics is no longer just about the web.
The rising interest in autonomous vehicles and development environments that support such vehicles highlight new opportunities for analytics.
The increasing demand for understanding customer preferences in advanced analytics means managers have become more report savvy and less stuck on vanity metrics.
As we can learn from automakers like Ford, effective study of customer needs and activity generate data that can create a renaissance within any company.
As more content providers discover the programming value of YouTube, YouTube Analytics becomes more valuable. Retailers should not overlook the engagement value of the viewing platform.
Radio Show
A2 Conversations
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How Analytics Can Transform State Government


5/17/2016  LISTEN   51
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Save Labor Costs With Predictive Analytics


5/10/2016  LISTEN   53
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
What the IoT Means to You and Your Insurer


5/6/2016  LISTEN   75
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
When It's Time for a Robot's Job Review


4/27/2016  LISTEN   21
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How Advanced Analytics Serve Healthcare


4/12/2016  LISTEN   88
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Life in a World of Big Data, Autonomous Cars and IoT


3/17/2016  LISTEN   34
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Sports Analytics: Driving the Business Forward


3/10/2016  LISTEN   73
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
See How Data is Revolutionizing Healthcare


2/25/2016  LISTEN   78
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Why Analytics are So Valuable in Cybersecurity


2/18/2016  LISTEN   47
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
The Analytics Job and Salary Outlook for 2016


1/28/2016  LISTEN   16
Information Resources
Quick Poll
Quick Poll
About Us  |  Contact Us  |  Help  |  Register  |  Twitter  |  Facebook  |  RSS