Ariella Brown

I’d Like to Thank the Algorithm that Made this Film Possible

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 7   >   >>
Lyndon_Henry
User Rank
Blogger
Re: AI music trods forward
Lyndon_Henry   2/6/2017 5:20:08 PM
NO RATINGS
..

Broadway writes

...I wonder too the risk that these momentary music makers will be used by marketers and more nefarious parties to manipulate our moods and coerce our behaviors. Certainly, this is already done in retail stores, for instance, but this leads to a whole level of targeting.



 

Maybe I'm naive, but I doubt that music can coerce behavior ... but I'm pretty sure it can influence behavior.

However, while robot music may be a source for cheaper music for applications such as TV and radio ads (very likely helping influence consumer behavior), my speculation is that the most serious adverse impact might come in the movie industry, if it makes major incursions in an industry looking for ways to cut costs. Quite a number of modern-era serious "classical" composers – e.g., Miklos Rozsa, Bernard Hermann, Franz Waxman, John Williams – have depended on writing film music for a major part of their livelihood. Replacement of human music by AI-generated scores could have a major impact on this aspect of culture.

On the other hand, who knows? Maybe future audiences in concert halls will enjoy listening to symphonies and concertos composed by really clever algorithms, performed to the rave reviews of (robot) critics ...

..

Broadway0474
User Rank
Blogger
Re: AI music trods forward
Broadway0474   1/23/2017 11:07:03 PM
NO RATINGS
@Lyndon, I wonder too the risk that these momentary music makers will be used by marketers and more nefarious parties to manipulate our moods and coerce our behaviors. Certainly, this is already done in retail stores, for instance, but this leads to a whole level of targeting.

Lyndon_Henry
User Rank
Blogger
AI music trods forward
Lyndon_Henry   1/23/2017 9:13:10 PM
NO RATINGS
..

Sane IT writes

The market for song writing bots is pretty small so I don't think competition is driving them to do better than a 4 note melody.  When someone teaches a bot the circle of fifths then we'll probably get more complex songs.  I think the musical side will be easier than lyrics though given the clunky movie dialog that spawned this discussion. 



There's new info to update this thread, provided in a New York Times article today 23 Jan. 2017) titled From Jingles to Pop Hits, A.I. Is Music to Some Ears.

Here's a sample quote:

Jukedeck is one of a growing number of companies using artificial intelligence to compose music. Their computers tap tools like artificial neural networks, modeled on the brain, that allow the machines to learn by doing, rather as a child does. So far, at least, these businesses do not seem to be causing much anxiety among musicians.



 

The discussion raises some intriguing possibilities. According to one of the AI music experimenters, Ed Newton-Rex, future systems could respond automatically to the listener's situation and concoct "music" accordingly:

Mr. Newton-Rex sees artificial intelligence changing the way we listen, especially if computers eventually "understand music enough to make it respond in real time to, let's say, a game, or you going for a run," he said. "Recorded music's brilliant, but it's static. If you're playing a game, Hans Zimmer isn't sitting with you composing. I think responsive systems like that will be a big part of the music of the future."



 

But I wonder about this. Would having those favorite tunes bouncing around in your head disappear? Would you hear something you like, but it goes poof after you complete your video game, workout, or whatever else you're doing? Maybe music is destined to become part of the new throwaway world?

 

 

Lyndon_Henry
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What machines think of humans
Lyndon_Henry   8/27/2016 10:58:30 PM
NO RATINGS
..

SaneIT writes

The market for song writing bots is pretty small so I don't think competition is driving them to do better than a 4 note melody.  When someone teaches a bot the circle of fifths then we'll probably get more complex songs.



 

I agree. I think AI-driven machines will be quite capable of producing acceptable elevator music or even scores for B-rated films.

Maybe even songs for the latest rage in pop music performance.

..

Ariella
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Music by algorithm
Ariella   8/25/2016 6:58:57 PM
NO RATINGS
@PC That's my take on the relative merits of the film and song, too.

SaneIT
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: What machines think of humans
SaneIT   8/24/2016 9:59:55 AM
NO RATINGS
The market for song writing bots is pretty small so I don't think competition is driving them to do better than a 4 note melody.  When someone teaches a bot the circle of fifths then we'll probably get more complex songs.  I think the musical side will be easier than lyrics though given the clunky movie dialog that spawned this discussion. 

 

Lyndon_Henry
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What machines think of humans
Lyndon_Henry   8/23/2016 10:59:25 PM
NO RATINGS
..

SaneIT writes

Here is Google's first "song" produced by AI, https://cdn2.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/6577761/Google_-_Magenta_music_sample.0.mp3 , a piano melody with just four notes.  Eventually I'm sure these will be less clunky and more complex but the machines are learning and it's better than video game music from the 80s. 



 

Yes, it is definitely better. Not a high bar to surpass, however ...

 

SaneIT
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: What machines think of humans
SaneIT   8/9/2016 7:55:40 AM
NO RATINGS
The uncanny valley is much harder to overcome than most people who take on a hobby project like this realize.  We can synthesize voices and instruments, we can make synthetic skin, organs, etc. but when you start putting the pieces together the sum of the flaws in all of the engineered parts gives us that creepy feeling.  Here is Google's first "song" produced by AI, https://cdn2.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/6577761/Google_-_Magenta_music_sample.0.mp3 , a piano melody with just four notes.  Eventually I'm sure these will be less clunky and more complex but the machines are learning and it's better than video game music from the 80s.  

Lyndon_Henry
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What machines think of humans
Lyndon_Henry   8/8/2016 10:41:20 AM
NO RATINGS
..

SaneIT writes

From what I understand there are computer generated pop stars in Japan, the music, the voices the persona, everything is artificial aside from the writing. 



 

 And then there's a robot that sings: 



Here's an article about it:

This Japanese Robot Is Proof That Mankind Is Doomed

Watching its pathetic twitching kind of makes you feel sorry for it, but to me the "song" is really, really creepy...

I'd say it needs more work before it's ready for Japan's Got Talent ...

..

SaneIT
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: What machines think of humans
SaneIT   8/1/2016 8:24:12 AM
NO RATINGS
I played a game with someone recently where we sent each other text messages just from the autocorrect/autosuggest keyboard.  It was possible to have a very surface level conversation and even reply with somewhat sensible texts.  It did get repetitive though and it might take 10 extra words to get the point across but it could be done.  This was just a keyboard and us picking from the 3-4 suggestions it gave without typing a single letter.  An AI that is trying to pass the Turing test should be able to write much better dialog. 

Page 1 / 7   >   >>
Information Resources
More Blogs from Ariella Brown
Do algorithms and AI eliminate bias or do they encode the biases of models? New work on AI policies is designed to shine the light on the black box of model design and use.
Social media and mobile devices may seem like a vast and scary unknown to parents of young children with phones and other devices. Now machine learning is being applied to the problem of protecting the kids.
Supply is not meeting the demand for analytics and data science professionals. Here's how one boot camp is looking to fill that gap.
Organizations around the world still have plenty of work ahead of them in terms of building trust in their data and analytics strategies, according to a report by KPMG.
Led by actor Gary Sinise, a pair of organizations are leveraging technology to provide smart homes to disabled veterans.
Radio Show
A2 Conversations
UPCOMING
James M. Connolly
Evolution of the Data Scientist Role


3/23/2017   REGISTER   0
UPCOMING
Jessica Davis
Monetize Your Data: Turning Insights Into Action


3/29/2017   REGISTER   0
ARCHIVE
Jessica Davis
Data Analysts in Training: Meeting Tomorrow's Demand


3/8/2017  LISTEN   63
ARCHIVE
Jessica Davis
Our Bodies, Our Data: Medical Records For Sale


2/21/2017  LISTEN   63
ARCHIVE
Jessica Davis
Energy Analytics: Using Data to Find Savings


2/14/2017  LISTEN   44
ARCHIVE
Jessica Davis
Sharpen Your Analytics & Data Management Strategy


2/8/2017  LISTEN   74
ARCHIVE
Jessica Davis
Analytics: Make the Most of Data's Potential in 2017


1/19/2017  LISTEN   19
ARCHIVE
Jessica Davis
A2 Radio: Can You Trust Your Data?


12/20/2016  LISTEN   70
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Retail Analytics: See Where Style Meets Statistics


12/6/2016  LISTEN   53
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Why the IoT Matters to Your Business


11/29/2016  LISTEN   45
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Will Data and Humans Become Friends in 2017?


11/22/2016  LISTEN   40
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
We Can Build Smarter Cities


10/20/2016  LISTEN   31
Information Resources
Quick Poll
Quick Poll
About Us  |  Contact Us  |  Help  |  Register  |  Twitter  |  Facebook  |  RSS