Bryan Beverly

On Analytics & Aristotle, Sans Toga

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
bkbeverly
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: History prevails
bkbeverly   5/28/2013 10:40:01 AM
NO RATINGS
@Louis,

Yes I will be sure to keep my day job - quantitative epistemologists don't make it to the Want Ads   ;-)

louisw900
User Rank
Blogger
Re: History prevails
louisw900   5/26/2013 10:53:51 PM
NO RATINGS
@Bryan   Great point, Western Civilization owes many foundational principles to the works of Rome and Greece.   I hope all students still have the opportunity and take advantage of the chance to study the various great Philosophers during their undergrad years, because it does promotion exposure to various types of critical thinking. 

One of my favorites !   Just don't get too carried away, I hear the market is weak for philosophers!  : )

bkbeverly
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: History prevails
bkbeverly   5/26/2013 1:14:54 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi Louis,

Thanks for the feedback; glad the info was useful!  Yes - nothing has changed in the last 2,500 years except the tools that we use to understand the world around us.  With all of the degree programs in the natural, social and behavioral sciences, much of what is taught was birthed out of the branches of philosopy.  Those folks (from the pre-socratics forward) put in some serious thinking time about every aspect of life - what it is and methods for investigation and analysis,

louisw900
User Rank
Blogger
Re: History prevails
louisw900   5/25/2013 3:52:26 PM
NO RATINGS
@Bryan   Thank you for this very high minded piece on the association between the work of Aristotle and Analytics.  In essence, critical thinking was the goal then as it is now.

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Re: History prevails
BethSchultz   5/24/2013 11:59:19 AM
NO RATINGS
Bryan, good advice -- and no doubt we'll see lots of interesting new companies, services, and products result as people apply some of this ancient wisdom to big-data and get innovative!

Brian27
User Rank
Prospector
Re: History prevails
Brian27   5/24/2013 10:02:17 AM
NO RATINGS
@Bryan - Shakespeare? Not sure I ever knew the origin (or I had forgotten it).  I tend to be better at discovering and relating facts, than I am at remembering them - I'm terrible with names. 

It may be that in grade school, for years, 'education' consisted of practically nothing but memorization of facts; so much so, that it's as if I've developed an allergic reaction to having to memorize anything.  That means that I often have to 'reinvent the wheel': figure out, what others know because they can recall, what yet others, had figured out; but that's not always a bad thing.  Quite a few facts 'stick' in my memory, though - if they interest me.  It's likely that I'll be able to recall your layout of Aristotle's categorizations and corresponding ER mappings. 

We all have our gifts; exact and detailed recollection of facts is not one of mine.  I can recall the origin of one quote, though: 'A man has got to know his limitations' - Dirty Harry (Magnum Force).

bkbeverly
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: History prevails
bkbeverly   5/23/2013 3:17:59 PM
NO RATINGS
@Brian27,

Thank you for the feedback and for adding value to the information shared; nice application of Shakespeare!

Brian27
User Rank
Prospector
Re: History prevails
Brian27   5/23/2013 2:08:11 PM
NO RATINGS
@Bryan - Excellent piece.  A fine transcription from the original phrasing to tabular form.  For all the important points made (by Mr. A., and yourself); we have to keep in mind that the '...identify the...and...' bits (which we can term encoding and decoding between formal and informal systems), will never be free of all ambiguities.  These categorizations, along with his syllogistic logic, do form the basis of the First-order Logic/Predicate Calculus, on which  E.F. Codd drew to create the Relational Model (ask Fabian Pascal for more exact information there); and on the framework of the RM hang the most reliable data management and processing practices.  Yet, as soon as people begin to make assumptions about definitions, translations and semantic correspondence, the worm in the bud emerges to spoil our plans for perfect concord. 

Thank you for authoring the post (helps me explain some principles to others).  It's of the quality expected of a Brian (even if you spell it funny). 

Brian27
User Rank
Prospector
Re: History prevails
Brian27   5/23/2013 1:15:28 PM
NO RATINGS
@Lyndon - truth in that; yet a weakness of the Aristotelian approach is its reliance on  a priori assumptions.  The very self evidence of many of his views caused them (or inferences drawn from them), to become encrusted as dogma.   I think Galileo would suggest we consider that, as we would apply them to analytics.  

bkbeverly
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: History prevails
bkbeverly   5/23/2013 12:53:20 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi Beth,

In many ways, the fundamental issues of social concern were first addressed by these ancient thinkers.  What I discovered in college was that many of these folks were wealthy or had a stream of financial support (private and/or public) which gave them the time to enagage in serious observation, reflection, teaching and writing. 

These folks did not have computers, but the foundation for today's analytics were dug centuries ago.  They did not have our technology, but folks like Aristotle had already arrived at the ideas for which many of us still seek.

I hope this posting encourages our community to dust-off their old humantiies books - there's a lot of old gold ready to be rediscovered and reinterpreted for this era. 

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Information Resources
More Blogs from Bryan Beverly
When governments make decisions,sometimes the value of a human life comes down to a formula, VSL.
The analytics concepts used in business also have a place in the operation of a church, although the results of any analysis could lead to calls to either hail or nail the leaders.
Some Dilbert observations raise questions about who might be a data snob. Take the test.
The jury may be out on the value of status reports, but while you wait for a verdict, think about how we learn or don't learn how to write those reports.
Consider this: Is knowledge in your organization created by technology or by the people associated with the organization? Bryan Beverly kicks off the discussion.
Radio Show
A2 Conversations
UPCOMING
James M. Connolly
Retail Analytics: See Where Style Meets Statistics


12/6/2016   REGISTER   0
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Why the IoT Matters to Your Business


11/29/2016  LISTEN   45
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Will Data and Humans Become Friends in 2017?


11/22/2016  LISTEN   40
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
We Can Build Smarter Cities


10/20/2016  LISTEN   31
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Visualization: Let Your Data Speak


10/13/2016  LISTEN   70
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How Colleges and Tech Are Grooming Analytics Talent


9/7/2016  LISTEN   56
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How Machine Learning Takes Handwriting Recognition to New Levels


8/25/2016  LISTEN   40
ARCHIVE
AllAnalytics
A Look at Tomorrow's Data Scientist


8/9/2016  LISTEN   83
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Analytics and the Making of a President


7/21/2016  LISTEN   76
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Analytics: Where We've Been, Where We're Going


7/12/2016  LISTEN   48
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How Predictive Analytics Can Take Your Company to the Next Level


6/28/2016  LISTEN   22
Information Resources
Quick Poll
Quick Poll
About Us  |  Contact Us  |  Help  |  Register  |  Twitter  |  Facebook  |  RSS