Noreen Seebacher

CORE Security Digs Through Data to Find Threats

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Alexis
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Re: That's the crux
Alexis   7/6/2012 7:05:20 PM
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Yes Lyndon, you're right.

A damaging cyberattack against Iran's nuclear program was the work of U.S. and Israeli experts and proceeded under the secret orders of President Obama, who was eager to slow that nation's apparent progress toward building an atomic bomb without launching a traditional military attack, say current and former U.S. officials.

The origins of the cyberweapon, which outside analysts dubbed Stuxnet after it was inadvertently discovered in 2010, have long been debated, with most experts concluding that the United States and Israel probably collaborated on the effort. The current and former U.S. officials confirmed that long-standing suspicion in early June, after a New York Times report on the program.

Lyndon_Henry
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Re: That's the crux
Lyndon_Henry   7/6/2012 7:00:29 PM
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..

Seth writes


It reminds me of the well known F.B.I. software 'Carnivor'.  Either way, it really shows that attacks or spying can come from anyway, even a government


 

Surely the Elephant in the Room on this issue is the Stuxnet virus, designed and deployed by the U.S. government, which has gone way out of control and now in the hands of Web terrorists threatens to be unleashed as malware against the public at large.

See:

Report: Obama Ordered Stuxnet to Continue After Bug Caused It to Spread Wildly

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/06/obama-ordered-stuxnet-continued/all/

 

Noreen Seebacher
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Re: That's the crux
Noreen Seebacher   7/6/2012 7:50:50 AM
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The company believes an effecient algorithm exists that provides optimal attack plans with computational complexity O(n log n), where n is the number of actions and assets in the case of an attack tree (between two xed hosts), and O(M2 n log n) where M is the number of machines in the case of a network scenario.

Anish
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Re: That's the crux
Anish   7/6/2012 12:46:27 AM
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Thanks for sharing this Noreen. Did Shah mention about the kind of large data available there which can help them boost the performance of their alogorithms if they wanted to ?

SethBreedlove
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Re: That's the crux
SethBreedlove   7/5/2012 10:32:46 PM
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It reminds me of the well known F.B.I. software 'Carnivor'.  Either way, it really shows that attacks or spying can come from anyway, even a government.  It could come from corporate espinioge. Some competitors are more ethical than others. 

Noreen Seebacher
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Re: That's the crux
Noreen Seebacher   7/5/2012 11:39:25 AM
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Interesting stuff on the flame virus, including the fact that there is speculation is was built by a government entity.

Moscow - While the identity of the Flame virus authors remains elusive, a security company is convinced that the evidence points to a sophisticated government operation.

"Who built Flame? It's some government; I don't know which exactly because we don't have any real hard proof, but it's not the usual cybercriminals," Alex Gostev, chief security expert at Kaspersky Lab told News24.

He said that though Flame made headlines, it was not the first super virus and it is likely that the developers are already working on a more advanced version.

SethBreedlove
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Re: That's the crux
SethBreedlove   7/3/2012 9:22:01 PM
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It good to be pro-active.  I'm wondering how security is responding to new types of threats such as the flame virus, a virus that can learn about the system it's attacking and adapt in order to hide. 

Noreen Seebacher
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Re: That's the crux
Noreen Seebacher   7/3/2012 1:38:37 PM
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Yes, absolutely. But I'm a bit surprised upper management isn't at least curious about the solutions. I'm no tech expert but I enjoy having an understanding of the gobbledygook!

BethSchultz
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That's the crux
BethSchultz   7/3/2012 1:19:21 PM
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Hi Noreen. I find myself wanting to substitute in just about any business term for Shah's use of the words "network security," in his closing quote: "They generally don't care about the technical gobbledegook behind network security. They aren't interested in more data. They just want solutions to their problems." Because, really, isn't that what analytics is supposed to be all about, regardless of discipline?

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