Noreen Seebacher

Chipping Away at the Privacy Wall

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Noreen Seebacher
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Re: Privacy is toast (probably)
Noreen Seebacher   11/30/2012 9:53:36 AM
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9/11 frightened too many people into thinking that privacy was a modest trade off for security.

SaneIT
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Re: Privacy is toast (probably)
SaneIT   11/30/2012 8:00:03 AM
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I think what we're seeing is the old frog in boiling water story.  If you slowly turn up the heat the frog will sit there until it dies, if you drop it into already boiling water if will try to escape.  Little by little privacy is being chipped away and we'll just adjust, I do think it will stop before we get to the 1984 vision of cameras watching us do our morning exercises, but I do think that eventually it will be very easy for companies to see what we are doing online and track us down by name.

Lyndon_Henry
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Re: Privacy is toast (probably)
Lyndon_Henry   11/29/2012 10:16:10 AM
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..

SaneIT writes


 

... I agree if you look at how the Obama campaign used the data that they had it seems foolish to think that we have any expectation of rules changing in our favor.  I read something the other day about them doing 10s of thousands of models every night to narrow down who to target and how to reach them.


 

Obama is regarded on the extreme right as something like the reincarnation of Lenin, and among the "progressive" (liberal) left as today's Great Multiracial "Progressive" Champion, but in reality he seems positioned more on the liberal wing of Wall Street (e.g., George Soros) and America's most mammoth industrial corporate power structure (e.g., Warren Buffett's BNSF Railroad).  Obama & Co. seem to have had no particular interest in protecting individual privacy, free speech, etc.

 

SaneIT also writes


The presidential race is a big deal but if you think about it they have less marketing money than most large corporations, what is going to happen when the big companies start doing what our government is already doing?


 

Makes me wonder if this will provoke a significant backlash, or whether most of the public will just bow down and get used to it...

 

Noreen Seebacher
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Re: Privacy is toast (probably)
Noreen Seebacher   11/29/2012 9:03:15 AM
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Interesting piece here:

President Barack Obama's campaign for re-election rested heavily on a busy data mining operation, complete with an analytics teams five times as big as the one in 2008, mysterious code names, and a chief number cruncher. Just what this operation was doing was held close to the vest during the campaign, but Time magazine's Michael Scherer got the inside scoop.



Read more: The big data behind Obama's campaign victory - FierceCIO http://www.fiercecio.com/story/big-data-behind-obamas-campaign-victory/2012-11-07#ixzz2DcWEmzGo



SaneIT
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Re: Privacy is toast (probably)
SaneIT   11/29/2012 8:23:35 AM
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@Lyndon_Henry, I agree if you look at how the Obama campaign used the data that they had it seems foolish to think that we have any expectation of rules changing in our favor.  I read something the other day about them doing 10s of thousands of models every night to narrow down who to target and how to reach them.  The presidential race is a big deal but if you think about it they have less marketing money than most large corporations, what is going to happen when the big companies start doing what our government is already doing?

Lyndon_Henry
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Privacy is toast (probably)
Lyndon_Henry   11/28/2012 11:18:49 PM
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..

Noreen writes


The Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights would certainly have an effect on big-data analysis, but the question is how significantly the data pool would contract when these anti-tracking measures are fully implemented. Will the ability to consistently collect and organize salient information noticeably decrease? Would the accuracy of constructed models suffer due to missing inputs? Will it really take a byte out of big-data -- or just be another weak attempt to control something that defies control?


 

I'm afraid I have an acute case of pessimism in regard to privacy.  They's a-gonna gitcha, no matter what you do.  The technology is exploding way too rapidly.  Legislation is far too clumsy to deal with it and provide any real or enduring "protection" for the public.

My hope is that the "exploding" technology will develop and provide countermeasure devices and procedures, available to the general public at reasonable cost, that will somewhat defeat the intrusions and mitigate the snooping.

 

kicheko
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Re: Facebook
kicheko   11/28/2012 7:26:58 PM
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I think Facebook is right to want to share data only to sites owned by them. If a third party wants to get info they should get it from the owners under a relevant "licence".

On a different note: Just suggesting that you could write something on the Obamacare data program and the proposed RFID chip implantation. I still can't find a good source to read on that.

rbaz
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Re: Facebook
rbaz   11/28/2012 3:50:50 PM
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Buried in the privacy debate is the unsettled question of who owns the collected data and with what rights and limitations. It is obvious in practice the data collector enjoys an open landscape to operate, with little implied or explicit restrictions. Views expressed on privacy have been mostly reactive to specific publicized occurances. The issues involved under privacy need clear distinction and definition for productive debate.  

BethSchultz
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Self-regulation & ethics
BethSchultz   11/28/2012 1:52:20 PM
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@Noreen, Judah Phillips (who will be hosting our Dec. 12 Webinar on social media analytics), has some great rules companies should apply to they're ensuring privacy and acting ethically with their use of social media data. He spells those out in Win With Advanced Analytics, for which he authored a few chapters, including on on social media analytics (as I mentioned in my blog today). He's got nine rules. Here are a few:

- Be absolutely transparent about what data you collect and how you collect it by creating and frequently updating a privacy and data usage policy and prominently displaying it on your site.

- Understand and be able to provide, on request, a list of the tracking and measurement technologies currently deployed on your site.

- Publish a simple metadata document that people, both externally and internally, can review that describes the social media data being collected and how the data will be used.

- Create formalized governance around measurement, tracking, and advertising technologies and involve your cross-functional representatives from teams across your company.

- Enable easy and logical "opt-out"

I especially like that third one. But don't recall ever seeing such in my social travels. Have you?

Noreen Seebacher
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Facebook
Noreen Seebacher   11/28/2012 1:46:55 PM
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Privacy is all over the news this week, what with the Facebook hoax and everything. But still:

Two consumer interest groups are asking Facebook to withdraw its proposed changes that would, among other issues, remove the ability for users to vote on modifications to Facebook's data usage and privacy policies. The company also wants to change how you filter incoming messages on Facebook, and Facebook wants to freely share user data between companies it owns, such as Instagram.

 

thoughts?

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