Noreen Seebacher

Once Upon a Time, We Threw Stuff Away...

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Hospice_Houngbo
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Re: Out of sight, out of mind
Hospice_Houngbo   12/31/2012 10:46:13 AM
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@kq4ym,

"Not being able to predict the future may hinder some distant real advantage to storing stuff we tend to throw away today."

Why do you think that stuff we throw away today might be useful in say, 5 or 10 years? I think that we would be overwhelmed by data that we won't ever have time to go back to our old files. That is what I have noticed in my 6 years of keeping my research files. 

SaneIT
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Data Doctor
Re: Out of sight, out of mind
SaneIT   12/31/2012 8:03:25 AM
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@Lyndon_Henry, I thought about that as I was hitting the post button.  I was sure that someone would bring up proving when a message was sent or that a time stamp might help them defend themselves in some imaginary future argument.  I think of all those murder mystery stories where someone is convicted by some miniscule mistake that they made.  Maybe the fear is that if a small mistake can prove your guilt that a small piece of good data might save you.

Lyndon_Henry
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Re: Out of sight, out of mind
Lyndon_Henry   12/28/2012 11:50:12 PM
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..

SaneIT writes


I think you've hit on why the hoarding starts in the first place.  A fear that something might be more important than it appears.  In cases like email threads there's no reason to keep every single message in the thread. I'd hate to think that every text message I get that says "Hi" is important enough to keep.


 

I think that last one might be safely zapped ... but wait — what was the date/time the "Hi" was sent?  Might need that...

There's a kind of OCD that sets in about all this cyberdata...

 

SaneIT
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Data Doctor
Re: Out of sight, out of mind
SaneIT   12/28/2012 8:40:27 AM
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I think you've hit on why the hoarding starts in the first place.  A fear that something might be more important than it appears.  In cases like email threads there's no reason to keep every single message in the thread. I'd hate to think that every text message I get that says "Hi" is important enough to keep.

kq4ym
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Data Doctor
Re: Out of sight, out of mind
kq4ym   12/28/2012 7:16:14 AM
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I do tend to keep a lot more stuff than I have a real current use for. But, I just wonder if at some distant time, capabilities of storage and retrieval may change in some new way that will make those 'random' emails, videos, photos, and notes very valuable.

Not being able to predict the future may hinder some distant real advantage to storing stuff we tend to throw away today.

SaneIT
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Data Doctor
Re: Out of sight, out of mind
SaneIT   12/7/2012 8:27:19 AM
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No, we don't flog them in the courtyard or anything like that, we just show them that their perception of what they have is wrong, drastically wrong in many cases, then we offer up ways to thin out what they are saving.  Last year after one of our C level directors was taught how to manage his mail he wanted to see the stats for our top 20 offenders because he was shocked that anyone would have more email that had to be held onto than he does.  When he saw that he was number 15 on the list he became our biggest supporter and called everyone above him on the list to find out what they had that was so important.

Ariella
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Re: Out of sight, out of mind
Ariella   12/7/2012 7:59:59 AM
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@Tinym In this school, only the office send communications via email concerning things like school closings,changes in schedule (loads of those after Hurricane Sandy), PTA schedules, and such. The teachers are not required to keep parents in the loop via email. I was making my own request, which the teachers were willing to comply with -- only with their own choice of means. That some favor texts is annoying because once in a while they will put out a notice for students that way, and those of us who don't check on texts don't get it. It's also rather ironic that they both assume students will have devices that will accept texts and ban them from use in the school. 

tinym
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Data Doctor
Re: Out of sight, out of mind
tinym   12/6/2012 11:13:06 PM
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@Ariella I'm surprised you met with a teacher who sends texts but not email. Our kids' school district has a district-wide online grade book for grades and attendance. Parents can get daily digests of student performance complete with detailed assignment stats. All teachers have a school-assigned email address and will accept email as a 'note from home'. A few teachers send out weekly reminders for test reviews or an attachment of the actual review. It's handy when you have a kid who can't seem to get papers home from school.

tinym
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Data Doctor
Re: Out of sight, out of mind
tinym   12/6/2012 11:06:47 PM
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That's an interesting study in tech usage. I'm surprised you encountered a teacher who sends text but not email. Our kids' school has district-wide email and an online grade book. Most of their teachers accept email as a note from home if they have the parent's phone and email on file at the school.

Ariella
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Blogger
Re: Out of sight, out of mind
Ariella   12/6/2012 10:12:24 AM
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@SaneIT I see. So they're not quite put in the stocks. Email threads, yes, for my Verion account I delete the earlier ones, but Gmail automatically stacks all the email exchanges.

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