Noreen Seebacher

Love You... Where's My Ham?

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Lyndon_Henry
User Rank
Blogger
Re: False positives...
Lyndon_Henry   12/28/2012 12:00:52 PM
NO RATINGS
..

MNorth writes


 Every business must deal to some extent with the frustrating balancing act of filling orders that aren't real vs. orders that don't look real but are and need to be filled.


 

When I was a kid, it was in vogue to order pizza over the phone to be delivered to some unsuspecting grumpy neighbor, then peek out the window and do the equivalent of ROFL over the confusion when the delivery boy arrived with the undesired pizza.

These days, I would want to perform "enhanced interrogation techniques" upon the perpetrators (whether I were the delivery guy or the recipient) ... but anyway, I would think that the amazing benefits of today's Big-Data/Analytics world, where they can trace you from your phone number (and who knows what else?), and then the increasing practice of requiring a credit card confirmation, are all conspiring to increasingly squelch opportunities for pranksterism.

With the undelivered orders of ham, I suspect something else may be in play...

kq4ym
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: False positives...
kq4ym   12/28/2012 6:56:14 AM
NO RATINGS
Yep, employee training is a must. How many times do you see an ad for a store special and questions an employee about it and come up with a blank stare.

Data is great and using it can improve the bottom line, but management must increase employee training to make it work successfully without making bad impressions on customers.

Ariella
User Rank
Blogger
ham for the holidays
Ariella   12/11/2012 9:05:44 AM
NO RATINGS
I've seen the picture of ham offered for Hanukah. While it strikes many as strange, the fact is that many celebrate the holiday who do not keep kosher. So there really is a possible market. Perhaps someone thought it would go well with latkes. 

Ariella
User Rank
Blogger
Re: False positives...
Ariella   12/11/2012 9:01:58 AM
NO RATINGS
@Noreen from the perspective of the woman who took the order, it sounded suspect. Perhaps she got in trouble in the past for putting through orders that no one ever picked up. So she was being circumspect. In contrast, I recently tried to order pizza from a new place that opened in my neighborhood and now expect that they won't stick around very long.

The phone was busy, busy, busy. Finally, a woman picked up the phone but refused to take the order, telling me to call back in 10 minutes. I tried. It was busy, busy, busy, busy, then ringing with no one to pick up, then busy, busy. Finally, after I don't know how many tries, a woman picked up the phone, and I finally gave in my order to be ready with more than 45 minutes to spare. She took down my name and phone number. But when my husband went to pick it up at the time, they had nothing ready and no record of the order. They said it would be another 20 minutes until pizza would be ready. When my husband called to ask if he should wait, I told him not to. We ended up picking up pizza at a shop that's been here for over a decade and knows to have pies ready at meal times -- even without orders. 

 

SaneIT
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: False positives...
SaneIT   12/11/2012 8:04:29 AM
NO RATINGS
I think I've heard this one before http://www.inquisitr.com/29647/million-dollar-ham/

There are inside jokes and other external factors that can lead to people doing odd things.  I've been in situations where I had to question if a person really wanted what they were asking for and if they understood what they were asking for.  In the two pounds of ham example I wouldn't be surprised if a local TV channel mentioned something outrageous like what the government spent for two pounds of ham and it resulted in deli's getting calls checking on the price of sliced meats.  These kinds of things are hard to catch from a data standpoint so while they look like outliers it's possible that they have a common thread.

Noreen Seebacher
User Rank
Blogger
Re: False positives...
Noreen Seebacher   12/10/2012 2:28:45 PM
NO RATINGS
Wanna hear a joke, SaneIT? "Two pounds of ham!"

SaneIT
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: False positives...
SaneIT   12/10/2012 8:53:56 AM
NO RATINGS
I think the examples here are more issues of perception not data indicating that the orders were suspect.  Now if that deli had been experiencing a high number of people ordering 2lbs of ham and then not picking it up I could see where their excuse would be valid but I suspect that it was probably more of a catch all.  Rather than saying, "we're really busy and I lost your order"  they just said "oh I thought it was a joke".   As for the big data side of ordering food goes I can see it's usefulness if you've got demographics and you have some insight into orders that tend not to be picked up or the delivery driver ends up being pranked or stiffed on payment I could see having a talk with the person placing the order before actually filling it or sending a driver out.

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Re: False positives...
BethSchultz   12/7/2012 12:50:48 PM
NO RATINGS
@Matt, John Barnes warns us about those dang outliers in his blog from earlier this week! Don't You Regress With Your Regressions  

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Caio! Seebachers
BethSchultz   12/7/2012 12:44:45 PM
NO RATINGS
@Noreen, my question is, had you ever ordered from the "love you not" pizzeria? Seems to me if three speciality pies were an unusual order that would have stuck in her mind -- like, "Oh, it's them again." What poor customer service. I know our local favorite wouldn't flinch if we called and ordered three times as many pies as that (not only do I have a large family but I come from a large family so entertaining requires big orders).

mnorth
User Rank
Blogger
False positives...
mnorth   12/7/2012 11:05:18 AM
NO RATINGS
It seems to me that in the examples of the pizzas and ham, it was people who decided to kick out an order because it looked bogus.  Analytics can do this too, because every model has false positives, and both analytics and people are sensitive to what appear to be outliers.

I live in an area where Sheetz and Wawa, two convenience store/gas station companies, have turned to kiosk-based food ordering systems to drive revenue.  So far as I have been able to tell (I'll admit I've never tested it too far), if an order is placed, it gets filled.  I can imagine some teenagers (or adults who behave as children), have thought it would be funny to go in, tap in a bunch of orders, then walk out of the store and abandon the food. Every business must deal to some extent with the frustrating balancing act of filling orders that aren't real vs. orders that don't look real but are and need to be filled.

Information Resources
More Blogs from Noreen Seebacher
Everyone is talking about big-data as an HR solution, so why doesn't it seem like we're any closer to solving the people problem?
Even at a trade fair better known for seminars on information technology, big-data was too significant to ignore.
All Analytics readers have serious issues with the data hidden in digital photos.
The system we use to select American courtroom juries is riddled with delays, frustrations, and inefficiencies.
It was actually a little too easy to slip a cellphone past security at a federal courthouse.
Radio Show
Radio Shows
UPCOMING
James M. Connolly
Analytics: Your Defense Against Cyber Threats


5/19/2015   REGISTER   0
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Live Interviews From SAS Global Forum


4/28/2015  LISTEN   11
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How to Hire Great Analytics Talent


4/23/2015  LISTEN   51
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Sports Analytics Mean Fun and Business


3/24/2015  LISTEN   4
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Secure Your Big Data in the Cloud


2/26/2015  LISTEN   114
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Make It Big As a Data Scientist in 2015


2/11/2015  LISTEN   106
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Big Data, Decisions & the Simulated Experience


2/3/2015  LISTEN   87
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
A Chat About Big Data, Machine Learning & Value


1/15/2015  LISTEN   125
ARCHIVE
Curtis Franklin Jr.
An Infrastructure for Analytics


12/18/2014  LISTEN   63
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Prepare for the Internet of Things Data Blitz


12/16/2014  LISTEN   50
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How Mature Is Your Analytics Program?


11/18/2014  LISTEN   148
Information Resources
Infographic
Infographic
It Pays to Keep Insurance Fraud in Check
While 97% of insurers say that insurance fraud has increased or remained the same in the past two years, most of those companies report benefits from anti-fraud technology in limiting the impact of fraud, including higher quality referrals, the ability to uncover organized fraud, and improve efficiency for investigators.
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on Twitter
Quick Poll
Quick Poll
Like us on Facebook
Like us on Facebook
About Us  |  Contact Us  |  Help  |  Register  |  Twitter  |  Facebook  |  RSS