Noreen Seebacher

Personalization or Privacy: The Fine Line

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Broadway
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Re: Value
Broadway   12/29/2012 2:23:14 PM
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A countermeasures industry? I think that is what free marketers would dictate happen ... So chances are that, yes, in the USA that is the average person's only hope of protecting their privacy.

Pierre DeBois
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Re: So cool it's creepy
Pierre DeBois   12/29/2012 8:43:55 AM
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True, monitoring how the privacy line is changing will be a challenge, probably the most talked about subject in 2013.  When does monitoring one customer's selection become a nuissance when the customer makes a switch? How does a company deploy the right resources to manage?  Given Target's baby diaper incident earlier in the year, retailers should see these kinds of questions appear more frequently and more publicly in some instances.

Lyndon_Henry
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Re: Value
Lyndon_Henry   12/28/2012 11:40:28 PM
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..

Kq writes


Maybe, customers can be provided a sliding scale of permissions they wish to grant to data collecting websites. Selecting from 0 to 10 would give consumers some real control over what they perceive as the appropriate amount of data they want to volunteer.


 

Well, as I've said in a previous thread, basically privacy is toast.  I think big business and the government will find ways around any rules, and the averge Joe or Jane can only try to bollix the snooping as much as possible.

I sorta expect some kind of "countermeasures" industry to arise.  There's a market for everything...

 

kq4ym
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Re: Value
kq4ym   12/28/2012 6:33:29 AM
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I suspect men are a bit more tolerant of any perceived privacy invasions than women. Knowing that companies are data mining my most personal bits of web history doesn't really bother me at all. I've given permission, even if sometimes inadvertently, and as far as I know, haven't been harmed.

But there are those who by nature or nurture just don't want anyone gathering their personal information. 

Maybe, customers can be provided a sliding scale of permissions they wish to grant to data collecting websites. Selecting from 0 to 10 would give consumers some real control over what they perceive as the appropriate amount of data they want to volunteer.

Lyndon_Henry
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Re: Value
Lyndon_Henry   12/26/2012 11:34:46 PM
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..

Earlier I wrote


The whole issue of smartphone non-privacy, and intrusive tracking and snooping by companies and other snoopers, was the focus of a CBS This Morning report this AM.  I'll try to find and post a link when CBS posts it


 

OK, CBS posted the links to these news segments:

Smartphone snoops? How your phone data is being shared

Tech expert offers privacy tips for smartphone users

 

Lyndon_Henry
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Re: Value
Lyndon_Henry   12/26/2012 9:31:54 AM
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..

Alexis writes


Yesterday out of no where I received am offer from Amex on my phone because I was close to the restaurant it was promoting. Hht fact that oh knew my location was a little creepy!


 

The whole issue of smartphone non-privacy, and intrusive tracking and snooping by companies and other snoopers, was the focus of a CBS This Morning report this AM.  I'll try to find and post a link when CBS posts it, but meanwhile, here are some highlights I recall...

The story started with a reporter stopping a man and child on the street to use their smartphone to snap a photo of them.  Via Instagram, the photo was then sent to a CBS consultant who immeditately identified their precise location (and in fact joined them within a few minutes).  The main point of this segment was that most people don't seem to be aware of the volume of info about their behavior and whereabouts that their phones are "broadcasting".

The focus then shifted to an in-studio interview with the CEO of Techonomy, who emphasized that a lot of the emergence of snooping capabilities, even with loss of privacy, is embraced by much of the public — younger people especially — because of the facilitation of social interaction and (ahem) sexual pursuits (he gave as an example the SceneTap app).  He also underscored that the explosion of smartphone apps illustrates that Analytics/Big Data (which he referred to as "data analytics") is one of today's foremost growth industries.  As the segment drew to a close, there was more discussion aboiut the difficulties of trying to preserve some remnants of privacy.

 

Lyndon_Henry
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Re: Creepy, maybe. Annoying, definitely
Lyndon_Henry   12/24/2012 12:02:17 AM
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..

Beth writes


That is definitely a waste of advertising money, especially as opera glasses, even if a personal purchase and not a gift, certainly can't be a repeat purchase. Unless you're prone to losing stuff.


 

Yes it's a waste.  Hey, wait — isn't good analytivcs supposed to prevent that?  Sounds to me like there's a lot of heavy-duty analytics and algorithmic refining that needs to be applied to all this online marketing...

 

tinym
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Data Doctor
Re: Creepy, maybe. Annoying, definitely
tinym   12/19/2012 12:51:26 PM
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@Seth that's a good option for marking items as gifts. I would like Amazon to work on a solution like this. There's a way to personalized suggestions there but who cares to spend the time clicking off items that were gifts?

Broadway
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Re: Value
Broadway   12/17/2012 10:13:56 PM
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@Alexis, that sort of location-based spam marketing makes me want to turn off my smartphone whenever I am not actively using it.

Alexis
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Re: Creepy, maybe. Annoying, definitely
Alexis   12/17/2012 7:40:54 AM
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I rarely let a merchant know something is a gift because I don't want to pay extra for a box!

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