Banks Should Tap Big-Data to Keep Customers


Gagan Kanjlia has a daunting job. As senior vice president of digital bank innovation at Capital One, his task is to "make sure we're not pushed into oblivion by competition we don't even see today."

Kanjlia was one of the speakers at the Predictive Analytics Innovation for Banking Summit, presented by IE, in New York City last week. The two-day conference featured keynote presentations, interactive breakout sessions, and networking opportunities for analytics professionals in the finance industry.

Kanjila echoed a common theme at the event: that investment in predictive analytics allows organizations to gain critical business insight that can make the difference between winning customers or losing them to competitors. "Digital lifestyles are transforming our business model in significant ways, especially in the marketing arena," he told attendees at the Conrad Hotel in Lower Manhattan.

For retail bankers, he said, the challenge is to "get customers to believe in our passions and products" -- and stay a step ahead of an ever-changing technology curve to evolve their abilities to attract and retain customers. "Product considerations are increasingly shaped by digital features," he said, citing a study that showed demand for mobile banking has jumped from 7 percent in the second quarter of 2010 to 48 percent in the second quarter this year.

In addition, he said, big-data -- in the forms of social media and online ratings and reviews -- are forcing banks to rethink their marketing strategies. "Do our business models reflect how customers are influenced and being influenced?" he asked, adding that research shows about 70 percent of people are influenced by opinions online.

"Marketing is about sending the right message to the right people at the right time. But consumers are increasingly self directed." They don't wait for banks or other businesses to provide information: They simply go online to find it.

To understand what customers want -- and prevent lack of desired services or unpleasant experiences from leading them to a competitor -- banks should use predictive analytics, he urged. In this age of big-data, he noted, businesses are no longer in control: The customer is.

Bankers can use analytics to better understand their customers' "digital lifestyle quotients" -- or how they use things like social media, e-commerce, and online forums -- as well their social influence and overall attitudes toward technology. Effective use of big-data, he said, will help bankers "cross the next big chasm before it is too late."

Do you agree? Which are the most digitally innovative retail banks globally? Is your bank doing enough to analyze your needs? Drop your thoughts below and take our Quick Poll, at right.

Noreen Seebacher,

Noreen Seebacher, the Community Editor of Investor Uprising, has been a business journalist for more than 20 years. A New York City based writer and editor, she has worked for numerous print and online publications. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, the New York Post, New York’s Daily News, The Detroit News, and the Pittsburgh Press. She co-edited five newsletters for Real Estate Media’s GlobeSt.com and served as the site's technology editor.

She also championed the commercial real estate beat at The Journal News, a Gannett publication in suburban New York City, and co-founded a Website focused on personal finance. Through her own company, Stasa Media, Noreen has produced reports, whitepapers, and internal publications for a number of Fortune 500 clients. When she's not writing, editing, or Web surfing, she relaxes in an 1875 Victorian with her husband and their five kids, four formerly homeless cats, and a dog.

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Re: Bank Marketing
  • 12/28/2012 6:51:25 AM
NO RATINGS

It amazes me that some of my banks provide such bad service compared to other banks. One would think that someone could take a look at their data and see how services provided either increase the bottom line or don't. And watch customer behavior as they increase deposits and utilize more bank services or the reverse.

Watching data should provide some very interesting opportunities for banks to increase customer satisfaction and their bottom lines.

Fraud Alert
  • 12/13/2012 6:20:22 PM
NO RATINGS

 

The first thing I think of when you say "banks and big data" is fraud detection.  My main bank doesn't do so great on this.  Even though I usually travel to the same places in the same foreign countries, they always seem surprised - my debit cards don't work until or unless I call them to get the block removed.  Really? Not impressed.

PC

Bank Marketing
  • 12/13/2012 6:19:03 PM
NO RATINGS

 

I'm not a big fan of cross-marketing by banks.  Savings, Checking, Investments, Loans, Personal Wealth Management.  I see how it really benefits the bank.  I don't see how it benefits me.  Guess that's why I deal with several banks.

PC

Re: embrace paranoia
  • 12/11/2012 9:04:18 AM
NO RATINGS

@Beth, I think the odds are better that we would be able to predict the next big thing LoL.

Re: embrace paranoia
  • 12/11/2012 9:03:24 AM
NO RATINGS

Catching them early would be the ideal situation, but I just dont think there will be a way to catch them all. I think there will always be startups that have super high valuations out of the gate.

Re: embrace paranoia
  • 12/11/2012 9:03:04 AM
NO RATINGS

That or winning the Powerball. It's a coin toss.

Re: embrace paranoia
  • 12/11/2012 7:45:00 AM
NO RATINGS

It can certainly be expensive to buy them out if you wait too long. Look at how much some of these startups have sold for ...

Re: embrace paranoia
  • 12/11/2012 7:03:14 AM
NO RATINGS

Maybe the key is to be alert enough to catch those dorm room inventions early on and buy them out for a modest amount

Re: embrace paranoia
  • 12/10/2012 10:22:56 PM
NO RATINGS

@Beth, if either of us could figure that out we would be very, very rich! ;-)

Re: embrace paranoia
  • 12/10/2012 5:10:11 PM
NO RATINGS

@buik. I wonder if there's some way to model when the next big thing will strike. ;-)

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