Meta S. Brown

What Big-Data Stories & Barbie Have in Common

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Brian27
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Re: Well said
Brian27   5/1/2013 11:08:47 AM
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@Noreen

I hope (and it looks to be true for most here), that the people trusted with informing develop an holistic approach to providing information; that the methods they employ are chosen to satisfy self realized metrics for quality.  If they can achieve these and satisfy externally imposed expectations, even better.  So it's really not about the size - it's about the satisfaction.  

Noreen Seebacher
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Re: Well said
Noreen Seebacher   5/1/2013 8:04:28 AM
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Are we rediscovering the merits of small data?

Brian27
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Re: Well said
Brian27   4/30/2013 6:45:39 PM
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@Beth and Meta,

...dislikes the term big-data and how everybody throws it around so cavalierly... / ...emphasis on programming knowledge over research knowledge is at the heart of the problem.

I'd agree with both of these statements.  Much of it comes down to perception and mindset.

A few years ago I did a presentation on Conceptual Modeling.  A point that seemed to resonate with a number of the attendees (mostly application developers), was a distinction I outlined between the mindsets of developers and those of data modelers/information system architects.  Developers tend to approach a problem in terms of process; modeler/architects in terms of structure.  Developers see the structure of data as something that exists, and exists  to be leveraged by applications; modeler/architects are concerned with creating structures designed to the purpose of supporting the informational system requirements particular to the given application domain, and in accordance with design principles assuring relevance and integrity of data.  Developers also see an application as the logical place for business logic; while modeler/architects are more likely to incorporate that logic into the structure's design.  One result of the different mindsets is that some see data as a commodity, while others would say data has no value if the particulars of its collection, storage and maintenance are lost or ignored. - the size of the data doesn't change that.

Meta S. Brown
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Re: Well said
Meta S. Brown   4/30/2013 4:05:03 PM
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Personally, I avoid the "analytically mature" concept like the plague. I won't try to explain my reasons here, I could write at length on that topic.

I will say that this goes on at some well-known companies that base their reputation on analytics.

 

 

BethSchultz
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Re: Well said
BethSchultz   4/30/2013 3:43:04 PM
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That's an interesting point, Meta. Do you see this mostly at analytically immature organizations or also at organizations that have more established and mature analytics programs?

Maryam@Impact
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Re: Permanent solutions are not free
Maryam@Impact   4/30/2013 1:10:41 PM
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Meta its a great distinction I was thinking more of the internships often available in the White House and other government offices that are not paid.

Meta S. Brown
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Re: Well said
Meta S. Brown   4/30/2013 12:47:36 PM
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Yes, I would agree. I would go further and add that many of the applications which currently use very large volumes of data reflect a lack of finesse, rather than a legitimate requirement to use huge volumes of data to meet a business need. The emphasis on programming knowledge over research knowledge is at the heart of the problem.

PredictableChaos
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Data Doctor
Re: Permanent solutions are not free
PredictableChaos   4/30/2013 12:26:31 PM
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Yes, Meta, proper instructionand perspective is absolutely necessary (and often lacking).

As to which was "right", Noreen - only one solution was built on valid assumptions, could be defended and explained by the person responsible and led to the correct answer. 

In this case, it was the answer that was provided in 1/20th of the time.

PC

BethSchultz
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Re: Well said
BethSchultz   4/30/2013 10:27:00 AM
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Hi Meta, I spoke with Tom Davenport yesterday, who says he really dislikes the term big-data and how everybody throws it around so cavalierly. He says it's aggravating, since so much of what he hears being described as big-data is really just traditional business analytics. Would you agree?

Meta S. Brown
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Re: Permanent solutions are not free
Meta S. Brown   4/30/2013 7:43:34 AM
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PredictableChaos,

 

There is also the matter of the instructions given. The two analysts may have had different understandings of how you intended to use the results, and the kind of analysis and level of detail and precision required.

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