Jon Martindale

Spying Without Safeguards, the British Way

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kq4ym
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Data Doctor
Re: Vanishing civil liberties in the UK
kq4ym   11/14/2016 5:17:45 PM
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Yes, very curious why the candidates didn't bring up privacy as an issue. Maybe "let sleeping dogs lie?" Just don't breach the subect if the public at large is not yet on to how much government will want to find out about everyone and everything if given the chance to do it without oversight?

Jamescon
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Re: Vanishing civil liberties in the UK
Jamescon   11/8/2016 8:15:50 AM
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@Lyndon. That makes me realize that I don't recall either of our two stellar presidential candidates ever discussing privacy policy.

Lyndon_Henry
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Re: Vanishing civil liberties in the UK
Lyndon_Henry   11/7/2016 4:41:47 PM
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..

Jim writes

The irony is that there are people in the US who wish our country adopted the view of the EU (as Jon mentions, a view that the UK helped to define) that privacy should be assumed by those who collect data -- privacy as a human right. Yet now the UK appears to be shifting to a view that privacy should be in the eye of the data holder.



 

For some time, leaders and officials in the UK and the USA have pointed to each other as models of policy precedent. In a "race to the bottom", this doesn't bode well ...

 

Jamescon
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Re: Vanishing civil liberties in the UK
Jamescon   11/3/2016 8:38:36 AM
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@Lyndon. True the US and UK seem to be in a race to the bottom in the case of privacy. The irony is that there are people in the US who wish our country adopted the view of the EU (as Jon mentions, a view that the UK helped to define) that privacy should be assumed by those who collect data -- privacy as a human right. Yet now the UK appears to be shifting to a view that privacy should be in the eye of the data holder.

Lyndon_Henry
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Vanishing civil liberties in the UK
Lyndon_Henry   11/3/2016 7:12:40 AM
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..

The more news I process about civil liberties encroachment in the UK, the more I have the sense the country is in a "race to the bottom" with the USA. 

The ongoing campaign against civil liberties by UK authorities really grabbed my attention back in 2005 with the London Metropolitan Police assassination of Jean Charles da Silva e de Menezes, a Brazilian on an extended visa riding to work on a London Tube (subway) train. Although the murder was officially deemed a "mistake", none of the police agents was ever prosecuted.

In light of this rather extreme abuse of civil liberties (i.e. a team of police assassins jumping on a train and summarily executing an innocent passenger with no questions asked), the Bulk Communications Data collection operation Jon Martindale describes almost pales in comparison. But this comprehensive dragnet for personal information has been huge.

As the Wired article that Jon Martindale links reports,

BCD consists of the 'where, when and what' of messages sent between individuals. BPD allow officials to collect mass datasets that could cover health, tax, and electoral information. Both types of datasets have been used as part of criminal investigations, but have been criticised by privacy advocates for being overly intrusive.

The tribunal added that the massive datasets (BPD) "include considerable volumes of data about biographical details, commercial and financial activities, communications and travel".



 

As Martindale's blog article further reports,

Along with the BCD, British intelligence agencies began collecting even more data in 2006. This information was known as Bulk Personal Datasets and it covered everything from the contents of communications, to financial activity -- far more private information.



"Spying Without Safeguards" indeed ... but would I really feel that much more comfortable if those snooping on me did so with more "safeguards"?

 

Information Resources
More Blogs from Jon Martindale
Microsoft's planned acquisition of LinkedIn raises plenty of questions about how it will use all that LinkedIn data, and what privacy protections LinkedIn users can expect.
A UK initiative aims to fight corruption by making those at the top of the food chain responsible for the criminal activity of those below them.
The Panama Papers, Snowden, the White House, and Ashley Madison, along with other data breaches serve as reminders that when you are entrusted with conducting analytics on the data of others you better have your security act in order.
The UK's Investigatory Powers Bill may be ready for the next step forward, which raises some privacy and business concerns throughout the nation.
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