Why Mobile E-Commerce Requires Analytics & IoT


Since the advent of popular mobile payment services, such as Apple Pay and Android Pay, the mobile e-commerce market has become worth billions of dollars annually and continues to grow. However, enterprises large and small are struggling to deal with the volume of customer data collected by these platforms.

The answer to this problem is a multifaceted approach that taps into other cutting-edge technologies, such as predictive analytics, big data, and the Internet of things, among others, according to an Oct. 25 report from Frost & Sullivan.

The report, "Next Generation Technologies for Mobile E-commerce," finds that if businesses, mainly in retail, help create automated responses to customers' needs, these companies can give customers more of what they want and can increase brand loyalty.

Read more of Scott Ferguson's report on mobile e-commerce, analytics, and IoT on InformationWeek.

Credit: Pixabay
Credit: Pixabay

Scott Ferguson, Editor in Chief

Scott Ferguson is the former Editor in Chief of eWeek, where he oversaw the day-to-day operation of eWeek.com, as well as eWeek Magazine, until the print publication stopped in 2012 and eWeek converted into an all-digital publication with tablet and smartphone editions. He worked for more than six years at eWeek, starting as a staff writer covering microprocessors, PCs, servers, virtualization, and the channel. Scott also worked in a number of editorial positions, including as managing editor, while helping to shape the publication¹s core coverage of enterprise applications, mobility, and cloud computing. Before starting at eWeek in 2006, he worked for the Asbury Park Press of Neptune, N.J., where he covered law enforcement, the courts, and municipal government for four years. He also worked at the Herald News of Woodland Park, N.J., where he covered a number of different beats. Scott has degrees in journalism and history from William Paterson University.

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Re: Automated Customer Service
  • 11/1/2016 8:46:43 PM
NO RATINGS

@ Ariella, They've done studies where they've found female voices were more soothing and indiviudals experienced less stress while being on hold or working with an automated system.  But I don't think that is much of a surprise.

Re: Automated Customer Service
  • 11/1/2016 12:28:34 PM
NO RATINGS

@Seth. You're right, if automated customer service works it can be fast for the customer and efficient for the company. However, that's a big if about whether it works. Personal experience, I'd say I've found answers on automated systems maybe 10% of the times that I had to use them. In too many cases the "help" they offer is nothing more than a massive list of documents called up on a basic keyword search.

Re: Automated Customer Service
  • 11/1/2016 9:33:42 AM
NO RATINGS

@SethBreedlove I'm one of those who always prefers to talk to a person unless i'm just willing to walk away from the purchase and will just leave feedback about why. But all these virtual people (nearly always female) seem to be designed to take on the role of human customer service reps.  

Automated Customer Service
  • 10/31/2016 8:20:14 PM
NO RATINGS

I'm all on board when it comes to omni-channel analtyics.  I'm not there yet with the automated customer service.  Profit wise it's a no brainer because automated customer service costs pennies compared to a $3 - $9 phone call. Customer satisfication wise it still leaves a lot to be desired because often the answers are not online and the actual customer service number is buried deep into the website.

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