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Re: One positive thing
  • 9/29/2011 12:24:33 PM
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By sending out a survery, especially to a disgruntled customer, without a response is useless. Its actually going to cause more of a problem.

If they're willing to send out a survey for satisfaction, go the next step and review what was wrong and follow up with the users. Even if its a canned e-mail saying what's going to be done to fix some of the issues that were described.

Validity of the Survey
  • 9/29/2011 12:21:03 PM
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I'd be interested to see what metric validity of these surverys? Honestly, I normally only fill out surveys if the service wasn't mediocre. This meaning that I'll normaly only go out of my way to respond to one if something is REALLY bador REALLY good, but if its average I don't normally reply.

How do you think this effects the overall validity?

Re: One positive thing
  • 9/26/2011 11:58:44 PM
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Michelle,

Whatever the reason for the policy change, it seems the customer service part got totally lost here.

Re: One positive thing
  • 9/26/2011 10:34:44 PM
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I wonder if there was chaos in the call center with all the changes. Maybe the reps knew of upcoming changes, maybe they didn't. Either way it sounds like an awful way to send the evening.

Re: Lost Opportunity
  • 9/24/2011 12:29:16 AM
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@Shawn    Absolutely. This unfortunately happens far too often.  Customer feedback is the easiest form of clean data a company can accrue - yes sure the obvious issue of data input can cloud the picture, but on the face - the data is pure and genuine and for the most part ignored.

I am sure there are some companies out there that do an above average job of addressing this type of data. I think of Virgin Atlantic for instance, though I have no hard evidence, this company does seem to respond to customer feedback.

But these types of companies are for the most part very rare and most often the exception to the rule.

Re: Lost Opportunity
  • 9/23/2011 11:57:21 PM
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Louis,

Reflecting on this a little more there are really kind of two issues here. 1.) really considering the feedback of a customer who had a very bad experience and was willing to give them details about it  2.) the poor customer service involved in not reaching out to this customer whether they intended to act upon the feedback or not. In this case, it's difficult to make much of a judgment on the first point but clearly on the second it was a huge missed opportunity.

Re: One positive thing
  • 9/23/2011 11:12:50 PM
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Beth,

A weird situation to be sure. I wonder if in this case the "new policy" itself was based on customer feedback or some analysis based on metrics of the existing policy and its effectiveness. Sometimes a data-driven solution may not, by definition, be one tailored to the preferences of an individual but rather to the overall efficiency of an organization. Still it's hard to understand how the policy change you describe could be particularly helpful to anyone.  

Lost Opportunity
  • 9/23/2011 7:32:52 PM
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@Joe   Nice Post. I can totally understand where you are coming from, and it is depressing to know that most companies do just that - ignore real customer feedback. One would think that most companies would understand the key to building a strong customer base is not the pampering of the good customers ( though that is certainly not something to ignore either) but really addressing the issues of dissatisfied customers.  

Not taking advantage of the chance to address shortcomings, will probably do more harm than good in the long run.

Re: One positive thing
  • 9/23/2011 4:05:34 PM
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We'd all fall over if we received such a call or email, though -- no? 

Interestingly in my Comcast experience, I was more than glad to fill out the two identical surveys since the guy was helpful. He didn't necessarily solve my problem, but he gave it his best and got me at least temporarily up and running. Then, last night, I had to work with Comcast again -- having installed a new wireless router. The entire tech support call-in process had changed one night to the next. It was crazy. "We can't do that any longer per new policy implemented today. I have to route you through to tiered support." Urr. Also, I didn't get a survey planted on my laptop although this guy had remote control, too. Instead, he emailed it to me. Also, come to think of it, gone was the "would you mind taking a two minute phone survey when you're done" prompt I'd heard over and over in all my calls to Comcast over the last several nights. Strange.

 

 

 

Re: One positive thing
  • 9/23/2011 3:54:53 PM
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Well put, Beth.

No, I wouldn't expect a response to be necessary for run-of-the-mill responses, but anything that is an aberration or distinctly negative requires some human response.

And yes, a "we've been horrible, based on this data, but now we've fixed it thanks to customers like you!" would be pretty neat.

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