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Yes. Please join us for the next session!

Blogger

So, we're wrapping. Thanks all! And, join us again at 1:30!

Blogger

"Leave me alone and I'll get you a nice model." Love that.

Blogger

@Beth, well I think that Prasanna's idea is that an analyst needs to have a real well grounded in stats, OR, and business and able to communicate findings to the business; aka well rounded.

Prospector

I'm wondering if the social aspect is at war with the idea of making sure you get qualified people. Thoughts?

Blogger

Telling a story, always a critical characteristic for good analytics talent, statisticians, etc.

Blogger

Hey, how about we start Data Analyst clubs in the high schools?!

Blogger

"You know when you see one and talk to one." -- tough guidance from Prasanna for those who are looking for insight on how to grow an analytics career. "Like a club."

Blogger

Ah, the talent question. Where do you find really good analytics people? And the answer is...LinkedIn?

Blogger

Data scientists tapped for expertise in VC funding decisions. That's kind of intriguing. Lots of interesting big-data startups.

Blogger

Not sure whether anyone in our conversation has sent in wquestions, but I'm wondering what questions you folks would ask.

Blogger

@Alison Diana -- OK, don't know who those folks are (except they're not with Chicago teams!). But I'm guessing the answer is "No."?

Blogger

@Beth - How about we skip the iPads.  The numbers are crunched by an analyst in another location and they can simply send instructions to the coach via earpiece! Now who's coaching the team?

Blogger

Interesting question on board-level acceptance of/reliance on analytics

Blogger

@Beth, but will an iPad make Dwight Howard resolve his issues with Stan VanGundy?!?

Prospector

@Beth, I agree (and I think my dedicated health partner would, as well!)

Blogger

Organizing healthcare to predict how different patients consume resources and then figure out how most efficiently deliver services.

Blogger

@Beth - Different sports represent different risks!  Football would be the worst.  Baseball seems to be more thoughtfull although there are still outbreaks!

Blogger

Partners would benefit greatly from being able to predict patient outcomes -- but more importantly, so will society at large. I think that's a good business initiative to focus on.

Blogger

@Cordell -- and let me add, he also noted that the teams would surely have to have multiple spare iPads around for those temper-tantrum prone coaches. :-)

Blogger

@Cordell -- well, to that point, we do all have to remeber that analytics doesn't GUARANTEE smart decision-making! But along those lines, Alex Martins, CEO at Orlando Magic said this morning he thinks we're shortly away from BI dashboards on iPads on the bench so managers can make play-by-play decisions.

Blogger

@Cordell, I think they do go together, particularly in the minds of the healthcare providers lawyers. A more 'empowered' patient is one that is less likely to win in a malpractice case by arguing they weren't informed or didn't understand.

Prospector

For Healthcare providers Press Ganey has been using Clarabridge for text analytics to provide an accurate Voice of the Patient. 

 

Prospector

Beth. It's interesting! Analytics is spread through relationships but must have a business objective...or a problem that needs to be solved. So these may be some reasons some businesses use analytics and some don't.

Blogger

I'm convinced that, right now, the most important tool for "patient empowerment" is a dedicated spouse/partner who is present, taking notes, and asking questions on behalf of the patient (who's typically quite busy just trying to survive or get better). I simply can't imagine going through the healthcare system alone. Must of the patient-oriented technology is an attempt to replicate the efforts of this dedicated surrogate for the patient.

Blogger

IDK, the fact that the "virus" has spread to the Mets doesn't make for a good case study!

Blogger

Well, lots of good examples presented here at SAS Global Forum Executive Conference. Chico's, Disney, Orlando Magic, B of A, Partners Healthcare ....

Blogger

Do business need and patient empowerement go together?

Blogger

Prasanna would be a good example of "spreading like a virus," as he's moved from one vertical to the next sprinkling his analytics knowledge here and there.

Blogger

Beth. Yes. Who's doing analyticss really, really well? Those with good relationships. 

Blogger

I don't know, @Beth and @Alison - I think the term 'patient empowerment' is a buzz term that every healthcare provider tosses about all the time, but I would like to see how many actually do anything to make it real.

Prospector

Analytcs not so sterile, left brain, but about relationships. That's interesting.

Blogger

@Alison, And that Mass Gen example is another case in point.

Blogger

Yes, you're right, Beth.

 

Prospector

Patient empowerment. That's a nice idea to hear from healthcare provider.

Blogger

@Curtis, @Alison -- there's the complications, described by Tonya

Blogger

@Curtis, you are SO right about multiple requests for the same information, often by doctors in the same group!!!

 

Prospector

Cook County -- scary hospital. Analytics or not.

Blogger

That's a good way to think about marketing analytics -- to minimize the gap in what we know about you.

Blogger

@Alison, the "incorrect" part is a piece of the discussion on why a patient is asked for the same information 3,000 times during a single hospital visit. Where I see a greater chance for error coming into the system, some see an opportunity for error correction. As far as ownership/control, HIPAA assumes that healthcare providers working for a patient have a legitimate need for access and therefore don't need explicit permission at each step: I don't think that the EHR protocols would really have a huge impact on that.

Blogger

I'd like these guys to address the issue of real-time analytics. For example, Prasanna is talking about providing 320-degree view of customer for call center agent. How fast does that need to be delivered to the terminal? As fast as sending out a thank you email when on online shopper buys? 

Blogger

Yes, I agree, rscollica. Yet I think there's a market for solution providers/vendors that can market an easier to use/correctly priced solution to SMBs that want analytics capabilities, especially those that integrate social media.

Prospector

Non-task-interfering. Like this term!

Blogger

But, @Curtis, how much control does the patient have over who has that data? And what if some of that information is incorrect?

 

Prospector

@Alison, I see many small businesses trying to use it, however, many are strapped for case to invest.  Hardware, software, analytic expertise, etc.  Some outsource, some try to partner; many don't have upper level management approval to do so.

Prospector

Curtis, yes, indeed. And especially as Hadoop makes its way outside of the big Web 2.0 companies and into the enterprise. (Even SAS talks Hadoop these days!)

Blogger

@Jim, standardizing the terms is huge, and something that's non-trivial given the "art" of medicine. I know it would be a very good thing, though, if every provider had access to all the information available for each patient.

Blogger

Just pushed this point out to our Twitter followers as discussed briefly by the panelists? Do transparency and anlytics go together?

Blogger

@BethSchultz, the whole structured/unstructured conversation is an interesting one, especially in light of the rise of Hadoop and big data...

Blogger

@Rodney Brown, perhaps. There's an increasing push for master data management initiatives. That could be a starting point.

Blogger

How much are smaller companies using analytics?

Prospector

@Cordell (Hi, by the way!) -- I do like to think there's room and need for innovation. But your whole analytics process can't be based on that.

Blogger

@Beth, maybe the COE's first goal can be to establish common formats and standards. :)

Prospector

@Alison, well depends on the org, could be VP, Director, or C-level. 

Prospector

Beth. Certainly, it's obvious. But having worked for some time in larger organizations, goals sometimes become fuzzy.

Blogger

rscollica - Who is that usually? Is it generally a c-level exec, or a biz unit owner, such as head of R&D, Sales, etc.?

 

Prospector

@Rodney Brown, your comment reminds me of one I heard this morning from marketing analytics exec at Best Buy. "I can't do analytics if I can't get access to the data." (Hence the reason for integration/CoE involving IT and analytics and the business)

Blogger

Having support is helpful but isn't there still room for "rogue" groups to prove themselves on small projects?

Blogger

Anyone catch this news today: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/first-sas-teradata-analytic-superhero-unmasked-2012-04-24

Prospector

@Shawn, that's true - analytics must have an executive sponsor to really be successful.

Prospector

Another important point from Prasanna Dhore. Framing a problem is the most important thing!

Blogger

@Shawn -- or obvious point, no?

Blogger

High risk projects out of the gate with skeptical support in the org are on thin ice.  I like the idea of building a reputation for solving problems.

Blogger

That's a great point Tonya is making about the approach to analytics and helping the business in bits and pieces. Going after the low-hanging fruit is always a good starting point for IT -- so why not analytics, too.

Blogger

That's a good point Jim, and it shows that all this talk of analytics may be putting the cart before the horse. You can't analyze tons of data if it exists in many different formats. Solve that first.

Prospector

Interesting point from Prasanna Dhore! Analytics must have a purpose to be funded!

Blogger

Beth, well I don't think of it as the dark side - I've used SAS for over 20 years now in 3 different industries.

Prospector

rscollica, over to the dark side, huh? ;-)

Blogger

@Beth, I'm working at SAS Institute:)

Prospector

Ah, rscollica -- that's great. And you're where now, may I ask?

Blogger

Rodney. Analyzing healthcare trends actually has been handicapped by more than regs. It's an issue of terminology, data formats, etc. Part of the EHR movement is to get closer to standardization, so particular treatments, ailments, etc., are defined the same way from provider to provider and insurer to insurer.

Blogger

@Terry, we've written, too, about some grad-level research work that essentially worked on the same sort of problem -- how to forecast spread of disease. There were interesting results. I'll have to dig out the link ...

Blogger

@Beth, HP does - I used to work there and under Prasanna's org.:)

Prospector

Data scientists -- 3 different schools at Berkeley?! Right, why can't they collaborate. That seems silly.

Blogger

Not so much cyncial as dubious. Glad to hear it had some impact.

Blogger

i would hope a tech company like HP gets the significance of analytics. Maybe I'm naive?!

Blogger

@Terry, such a cynic. I recall reading the CDC actually made pretty close attention to it, too.

Blogger

Google Flu did indeed generate a lot of attention... for Google.

Blogger

@Beth and @Terry, it may be a parlor trick that shows what could be done if the enormous amounts of real patient data was allowed to be analyzed on the fly for healthcare trends. Regs get in the way of so much innovation in this space.

Prospector

Analytics education -- hot topic here on A2.

Blogger

Incentives? That's an interesting idea. Pay for insight, beyond basic quota. 

Blogger

Beth: I agree - I've seen ACOEs work very nicely in organizations and they embed analytics throughout the enterprise.

 

Prospector

@Terry -- and I'll add to that, it got people's attention. Which is important.

Blogger

Terry -- maybe, but the trending/predictions proved true.

Blogger

Center of Excellence -- hmm. Prasanna says they really aren't so good. Not sure I buy that -- need something to merge IT, analytics and the business, I think.

Blogger

Sorry, Beth... Google Flu just seems like a really cheap analytics parlor trick

Blogger

Curtis, you said: "I've asked a number of healthcare professionals about this, and they seem very resistant to change. They seem to justify it on the basis of checks and double-checks on patient identity and therapeutic needs. It's a very interesting conversation..." How does this conflict with use of data?

Blogger

There's a lot of interesting data gathering and exploration in healthcare data outside the corporate sector, too -- which is where we might ultimately see some real advantage in healthcare. Simple example is Google Flu trending

Blogger

I would definately agree, in many industries there are not enough people who know how to analyze data efficiently to assit the business in making decisions.

Prospector

@Jim: Yeah, exactly. Asking "what problem are we trying to solve?" is always a good way to start before investing time/resources in a new technology.

Prospector

The sharing of data, any data, is becoming a huge issue, and not just in health care! SH

Blogger

@Curtis, we've talked about that "do we need a human still" question a bit on AllAnalytics.com and I think I have to answer with the oh-so-certain, "It depends." It depends on where the data is coming from and what your purposes are. But we do see the need to translate unstructure text (sentiments for example) into structured data, plunked into the database, for analytics

Blogger

Nicole. That seems to make sense -- identify the problem and then use analytics to find the solution, or at least the reasons behind it. Otherwise you can end up using analytics on an extended fishing trip.

Blogger

Different states have differing sets of policies on use of data in the healthcare industry

Prospector

@Kim, I've asked a number of healthcare professionals about this, and they seem very resistant to change. They seem to justify it on the basis of checks and double-checks on patient identity and therapeutic needs. It's a very interesting conversation...

Blogger

@Kim: The privacy and liability issues are really extraordinary in this sector. Not to put too fine a point on it, but everybody's scared to death of malpractice or getting fined by regulators (usually in the millions of $)

Blogger

@ASHDa That sounds much better.  Not finding that in NYC at all.  Here you copy out your details by hand twenty times, then someone inputs them at a terminal.  Prehistoric.

Prospector

Every conversation that happens, there is an exhaust of data somewhere. Interesting point from Prasanna Dhore!

Blogger

ASHda -- so it'd be great to hear if the healthcare providers in Charlotte are in turn using the data they gather to model for better patient care, etc. Probably not at this point, though!

Blogger

@BethSchultz, do you think the natural language processesing is going to become good enough to make it really cost-effective? Will we always have to have a process that involves a human going over the transcript to make sure no errors were introduced?

Blogger

@Curtis, it seems to me to be a no brainer to have a central database of info on a patient from which other forms can be populated.  I almost feel I could set it up myself, and I have trouble changing a light bulb.

Prospector

To Jim's question, I am always reading/hearing that the questions/problems must come first, then analytics should be applied to get specific solutions to specific problems.

Prospector

@Kim Davis, I recently moved to Charlotte and every healthcare provider Ive been to so far uses EHRs.I havet seen a pen, yet. All the data gathered has been digital. I recently hurt my hand playing soccer, so had to get an x-ray. Even the x-rays were sent directly to the computer in my room for the Dr. to look at. I was pretty intrigued. 

Prospector

@Kim Davis, I've wondered that, too: spending time in the hospital made me very aware that a lot of data is collected over and over. It seems like each time is an opportunity for data-entry error...

Blogger

Sounds like to me that if an organization wants to make better decisions using data/analytics, then they need a data governance and information gathering process to guide and manage this as a useful business asset.

Prospector

I hope natural language processing is much improved.  I looked at it a few years ago, and automated recognition abilities were dire.

Prospector

Natural language processing -- we'll be hearing more and more about that as companies struggle to understand the unstructured data comprising big-data

Blogger

Healthcare --even big pharma -- is so hamstrung by regulation that it's a wonder there's any forward movement. It's pretty eye-opening to work with clients in this sector

Blogger

If you start with improved decision making, as Tonya is discussing, that's a great starting point for developing a predictive enterprise

Blogger

Great question Jim. I would be curious to know if the research mentioned that as well. 

Prospector

@Kim Davis: All that PAPER

Blogger

I like Tom's point here too about accountability as part of a data-driven decision-making process.

Blogger

Tonya: 10s of thousands of rules, governance structure, collab platform -- that's smart thinking.

Blogger

I always wonder why hospitals and clinics fail at the basics of data gathering.  All those duplicative forms.

Prospector

I think too often new technology comes along that IT or line-of-business managers get excited about, without conisdering the larger impact

Blogger

Beth. Here's a chicken or egg question. Wondering if it came up in the HBR research. Are people primarily using analytics to identify where the problems/opportunities lie? Or are they identifying problems on their own, and applying analytics to find the right solutions?

Blogger

Thanks, glad to be here!

Prospector

Tom says institute companywide look at decision-making. Sounds like decision management systems we've written about extensively, as well as hosted via Webinar with James Taylor

Blogger

Be interested to read it too, Beth!

Blogger

I'll have to read the Partners Healthcare chapter in Tom's book! (Have it in my hotel room, actually!)

 

Blogger

Beth. I like the idea of healthy skepticism too!

Blogger

Prasanna: "Start with business problem and work backwards." Such a basic point, but behooves companies to keep reinforcing it.

Blogger

Hi everyone!

Prospector

But the question is whether analytics should be cast  as opposed gut decision-making. Shouldn't it be when gut decisions are made despite the data?

Blogger

Big-data, especially healthcare providers collaborating on big-data, will move medical research forward in giant steps, I think. 

Blogger

We wrote about the HBR "healthy skepticism" piece, too!

Blogger

I like Prasanna's description of healthy skeptics.

Blogger

Prasanna has great experience across so many verticals -- media, financial, consulting, and now at HP. 

Blogger

Here we see a problem in the healthcare industry. As you mentioned Terry. Trust in gut decisions.

Blogger

I dont think Drs are anti data just need better ways to compile it and maintain it and make it useful!

Prospector

Good analytics does mean knowing when to exercise judgement, as Tonya points out. 

Blogger

But going with your gut is still remarkably widespread where biz analytics are concerned, no?

Blogger

Clinical data sounds like real challenge to work with. 

Blogger

Good morning, esteemed colleagues

Blogger

Tonya and her healthcare challenges: heros are those that went in, looked past data, went with gut and came up with solution. That's hard to get past if you're trying to change corporate mentality, I'd say!

Blogger

These themes, that analytics need to be further embedded in organization, runnign throughout this conference

Blogger

Howdy themuroff! Thanks for joining us!

Blogger

In HBR survey, cost reduction comes up really high on impact of analytics. That makes sense, too. Easier to justify. But little differentiation 

Blogger

An undercurrent here, Beth...analytics doesn't exist on its own! Team work and communication are important.

Blogger

I think processes and technology are the biggest whys involved.

Prospector

That's an interesting number too and shows real realization of the issue...maybe?

Blogger

themuroff -- buy why? what's the biggest issue? technology? culture? processes?

Blogger

Only 8% say really far ahead of competitors. 26% say somewhat ahead of others.

Blogger

I think people would like to use it more but can't always support it across all functions.

Prospector

26% integrated. 74% for specific use. Tom says that a quarter saying integrated is actually great progress. Used to be more like 5%

Blogger

Just posed the question to our Twitter followers: "How likely is your company to rely on data? Join our live chat?"

Blogger

Poll question: Are analytics integrated or used for specific functions? (Tom impressed by speed of texting here!)

 

Blogger

What impacts decision making? Analytics making inroads, and external data has increasing impact.

Blogger

What's your process? 27% say formal, corporatewide decision making process -- same say analytics embedded. 

Blogger

Interesting numbers and it goes to show the importance people place in making decisions based on data.

Blogger

HBR asked readers that issue: 646 readers, most from cos. with more than 500 employees. Do you feel more pressure than ever on decision-making. Yes, 73% -- get more bang.

Blogger

Analytics alone not the only thing. Have to look at other tools, etc., and analytics combined with other things. 

Blogger

Tom: realizes that having worked on analytics and knowledge management -- actitivities intended to create better decisionmaking but sometimes don't. So he set out to find 12 good stories about those who get it right. "Great man is history." Great decisions made by groups, using analytics.

Blogger

Prasanna Dhore -- 1M PCs and printers ship every week. Wow. I met with Prasanna yesterday in one on one. Great guy!

Blogger

Partners Healthcare's Tonya Hongsermeier -- a new addition!

Blogger

Tom Davenport, always great to hear his thoughts. 13 books! Including his newest, Judgement Calls.

Blogger

Making data make a difference. An apt theme.

Blogger

And we're getting started.

Blogger

And, don't forget if you like what you hear, tweet, too! #SASGF12 or #SASEC12 or, of course, #allanalytics

Blogger

More than 2000 registrations live! 

Blogger

Quiet an auspicious panel lined up ready to present: Angelia Herrin, an editor with Harvard Business Review, Tom Davenport, analytics thought leader (and an AllAnalytics.com blogger), and Prasanna Dhore, vice president of global insights at HP

Blogger

Hi Beth. Hope we'll have a couple more people joining us for the big events.

Blogger

Hey all. Getting close to start time for our first live e-chat today, Judgement Calls: Analytics-Based Decision Making and The Teams That Do It Right." Please join in the conversation from onsite or at your desktops! (For the latter, tune into the live simulcast here.

Blogger

Join us here, Tuesday, April 24, for an e-chat live from Orlando where we'll be attending SAS Global Forum Executive Conference and sharing speaker insight and our own two cents during the 10:45 a.m. to noon session, Judgment Calls: Analytics-Based Decision Making and The Teams That Do It Right

Speakers: Angelia Herrin, an editor with Harvard Business Review, Tom Davenport, analytics thought leader (and an AllAnalytics.com blogger), and Prasanna Dhore, vice president of global insights at HP

If you're not attending the conference, no worries! You can catch the simulcast here (register in advance) and join in our discussion.

 

Blogger


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