Comments
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 4   >   >>
impactnow
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A generational thing?
impactnow   12/27/2016 5:30:53 PM
NO RATINGS
Ariella were you ever concerned about the privacy of that recording? I saw a special recently where doctors were wearing technology similar to google glass and having a representative in another country transcribe notes for them during the exam. The person was able to vie w the exam and hear about the patient concerns and doctor Reponses. Some more sensitive exams were shielded from the glass.

Ariella
User Rank
Prospector
Re: A generational thing?
Ariella   12/27/2016 10:28:02 AM
NO RATINGS
@Lyndon_Henry all the doctors I've seen in the past several years enter data directly into a computer with the exception of a dermatologist who speaks his notes into a recorder. It's actually a bit disconcerting to hear that while you're there, which is why silent writing likely is much preferred. 

Lyndon_Henry
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A generational thing?
Lyndon_Henry   12/27/2016 8:56:20 AM
NO RATINGS
..

T Sweeney writes

Raise your hand if your primary care provider is still writing by hand (and by writing, I mean scribbling) on your medical chart. It's long past time for a data input method for the 21st century.



 

Maybe this will brand me as a Neanderthal or Luddite or something, but there's a lot to be said for the user-friendliness, accessibility, ease of use, energy efficiency, and other advantages of ordinary pen on paper for many fairly simple writing applications. I don't think current technological gadgetry is quite there yet for total replacement.

Now in the future, if a truly intelligent robot is taking the notes ...

 

Zimana
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A generational thing?
Zimana   12/27/2016 8:25:36 AM
NO RATINGS
I hear you - so much of the internet is commercialized, and people are prone to do their own investigation of health issues, so tI see how a marketing gimmick can become truth without due diligence. Hell, Chrysler had everyone believing in Corinthian leather, so what's to stop a marketing-savvy firm from twisting a fact.

kq4ym
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: A generational thing?
kq4ym   12/26/2016 11:11:13 AM
NO RATINGS
I sometimes wonder how much popular trends are more of a marketing gimmick than true health science. The 10,000 steps idea surely played into those folks who enjoy, and indeed might be addicted to exercise, measurement and checklists to '"health." Whether the number of steps taken daily prove to be universally valid remains to be seen I would guess.

SaneIT
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: A generational thing?
SaneIT   11/28/2016 10:28:40 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm kind of surprised they haven't already run into some injury/over use lawsuits.  I remember seeing in a few different places that there was a push for 10,000 steps a day as your daily goal with various fitness trackers.  10,000 steps is up near 5 miles so strapping a fitbit on and trying to go from riding the couch to walking 5 miles a day is apt to lead to some issues.  I do think for trending they are useful, the problem seems to be when they are relied upon too heavily.  From the companies doing fitness challenges using steps to determine contest winners I hear the same stories about the person who won't sit or stand still for anything at work.   

rbaz
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: Assembly line healthcare
rbaz   11/26/2016 3:06:23 AM
NO RATINGS
@Terry Sweeney wrote: ' I too shudder to think about any conversation where government, industry and consumers try to define "value" or "positive outcome" in healthcare, though maybe we're headed there as lawmakers look to repeal the Affordable Care Act.' You are correct to point out the folly of the stated goals and the points of measurement towards achieving them. I would think any continued improvement should suffice and value is to be defined by the effects of such improvement. Although I do understand that a monetary value is always to be placed and that more often is the monkey wrench in the works.

LisaMorgan
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A generational thing?
LisaMorgan   11/25/2016 10:29:47 PM
NO RATINGS
@Terry Sweeney, I keep saying that the pace of technological innovation is far outpacing our ability to understand the actual and long-term effects.

"May you live in interesting times" was meant as a curse!

Still, it is fascinating...

Anyone remember the backlash about FitBits being able to tell when you're having intimate time with someone?  I don't think users think about these things.  OTOH, they don't have the sensitivity some of us have with a front-row seat.

T Sweeney
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A generational thing?
T Sweeney   11/25/2016 3:31:30 AM
NO RATINGS
Interesting anecdote, SaneIT. Eagerly standing by for the first clas action suit filed on behalf of hapless FitBit users everywhere claiming HIPAA and personal privacy laws violated, pain and suffering, etc. The FitBit EULA can't be that ironclad.

T Sweeney
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A generational thing?
T Sweeney   11/25/2016 3:28:25 AM
NO RATINGS
You make several good points, Lisa. Yes, I want my PCP's full attention, or as much as I can get where they're not inputting symptoms, treatment or Rx info.

Still, portability of medical info is missing from the overall equation. But if we have to trade quality of care for portability, I'll stick with crap portability, please.

 

Page 1 / 4   >   >>


Latest Blogs
Visualizations help communicate the meaning behind analytics to a variety of users. Now virtual reality is taking that a step further.
You've heard all about the data science talent gap that McKinsey cited in 2011, but there's a lot more -- including new information -- that you need to know about McKinsey's ongoing research. Learn more Thursday on All Analytics Radio.
What hybrid automobile offers the highest MPG? It's not the Prius anymore. Take a look at these visualizations to find out the new leader.
Understanding retail customers means knowing what they will want and when they will want it. To deliver that, retailers must be able to see customer behavior across physical stores, the web, mobile apps, and more.
Chatbots, AI, virtual reality, machine learning, and more will be featured as leading edge technologies for retailers attending the NRF Annual Convention and Expo in New York City. But many retailers are still getting their arms around advanced analytics.
Radio Show
A2 Conversations
ARCHIVE
Jessica Davis
Analytics: Make the Most of Data's Potential in 2017


1/19/2017  LISTEN   19
ARCHIVE
Jessica Davis
A2 Radio: Can You Trust Your Data?


12/20/2016  LISTEN   70
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Retail Analytics: See Where Style Meets Statistics


12/6/2016  LISTEN   53
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Why the IoT Matters to Your Business


11/29/2016  LISTEN   45
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Will Data and Humans Become Friends in 2017?


11/22/2016  LISTEN   40
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
We Can Build Smarter Cities


10/20/2016  LISTEN   31
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Visualization: Let Your Data Speak


10/13/2016  LISTEN   70
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How Colleges and Tech Are Grooming Analytics Talent


9/7/2016  LISTEN   56
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How Machine Learning Takes Handwriting Recognition to New Levels


8/25/2016  LISTEN   40
ARCHIVE
AllAnalytics
A Look at Tomorrow's Data Scientist


8/9/2016  LISTEN   83
Information Resources
Quick Poll
Quick Poll
About Us  |  Contact Us  |  Help  |  Register  |  Twitter  |  Facebook  |  RSS