Comments
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 4   >   >>
bkbeverly
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: Post-Truth era?
bkbeverly   1/22/2017 8:52:17 PM
NO RATINGS
@Lyndon, I think that instead of post-truth, we can call it 'alternative truth' - a post modern expression of competing truth claims of equal weight (smile).

Lyndon_Henry
User Rank
Blogger
Post-Truth era?
Lyndon_Henry   1/22/2017 3:53:40 PM
NO RATINGS
..

There have been several good analyses in the media (the real, not fake, media) about this issue of Fake News and the issue of What is Truth, Falsehood, Reality, and Fantasy.

A Jan. 15th New York Times essay titled Lie to Me: Fiction in the Post-Truth Era made some interesting observations. Among them:

People who can turn a lie into a truth have the power to shape reality; they are poets of the real. And the audience that gives them its willing suspension of disbelief is a co-conspirator in this uncanny transformation, just as novel readers conspire in their enchantment. The bond between demagogues and their audience is cemented by their exhilarating consciousness of shared culpability.

The problem with our "post-truth" politics is that a large share of the population has moved beyond true and false. They thrill precisely to the falsehood of a statement, because it shows that the speaker has the power to reshape reality in line with their own fantasies of self-righteous beleaguerment.



 

Kinda scary, especially when you realize that this will fall on deaf ears of a huge chunk of the population who already reject the New York Times as merely a purveyor of Fake News  ...

 

Broadway0474
User Rank
Blogger
Re: data
Broadway0474   1/22/2017 9:23:53 AM
NO RATINGS
kq4ym, that;s a great point. In the old days, people relied exclusively on their local newspaper. First the morning edition, then the evening edition. And they trusted in it. Sometimes, that trust was misplaced, but as journalism got to be a calling, there grew a certain ethos of accountability. Now everyone but the journalists have ceased to believe in this ethos.

kq4ym
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: data
kq4ym   1/14/2017 10:36:31 AM
NO RATINGS
One of the results of our social media and internet society is we all are locked in to favorite sources for getting information and news. And the more we continue going to that source the more we believe the veracity of the information at that source. If we tend to get our news from unreliable or biases places, we're going to believe it after a while.

dafa
User Rank
Prospector
Re: data
dafa   1/3/2017 11:43:17 AM
NO RATINGS
I agree this post. You can control it but cannot eliminate it. 

 

Broadway0474
User Rank
Blogger
Re: data
Broadway0474   12/30/2016 11:41:04 PM
NO RATINGS
There's always been spin, yellow journalism and the such --- newspaper owners who used their ink to buttress their political allies are no different than what Fox News does now. What's different is that people in one of the better educated societies in the world now believe that a child porn ring can be run by a presidential candidate out of a pizza joint. We are a society of chosen idiots with the wisdom of the Medieval Times. End of Days folks...

Lyndon_Henry
User Rank
Blogger
Re: data
Lyndon_Henry   12/30/2016 9:46:38 PM
NO RATINGS
..

Louis writes

 It used to be that people just took the Web for granted because they simply didn't know any better, but when it comes to news or what is considered news, a responsible person would question and look for additional sources to confirm whether the story is fact or fiction.  



 

There's a lot of discussion around this fact-truth-fake news issue, and several pundits seem to be converging on the assessment that nowadays there's widespread popular disinterest and disbelief in factual sources (particularly mainstream news) in preference for trust and belief in leaders and news sources that confirm the individual's own existing beliefs.

One interesting example of this discussion is the article Why You're Fooling Yourself About 'Fake News' posted on the liberal-leaning Talking Points Memo site by its editor/publisher, Josh Marshall. I found especially interesting his observation:

People's political beliefs don't stem from the factual information they've acquired. Far more the facts people choose to believe are the product of their political beliefs. In fact, I think it even goes beyond this. I think there's a legitimate question about how much many people actually 'believe' what we call 'fake news'. In many cases, 'fake news', the latest manufactured outrage, functions as a kind of ideational pornography, ideas and claims that excite people's political feelings, desires and fears and create feelings of connection with kindred political spirits.



 

In other words, the notion that people can be convinced by valid, factually accurate news reports, or can be persuaded to check dubious reports, is no longer a realistic expectation.

Wow ... Have we created a society of dingbats, or what?

..

impactnow
User Rank
Blogger
Re: data
impactnow   12/29/2016 4:42:52 PM
NO RATINGS
Agreed, the challenge is that people think it is! Using the sharing tool makes it appear like a news sight and many do not know that the "news" is not verified by any source. Normally I would not think it was a huge issue but when someone shows up a to a local Pizza shop with a gun and endangers dozens of people it's a problem.

bkbeverly
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: Information For Sale
bkbeverly   12/29/2016 10:32:23 AM
NO RATINGS
@Louis, When you ask is it OK, do you mean legally or ethically?  Legally yes, especially when you agree to the small print that says that you must opt out of having your contact or demographic data sold to other vendors. Ethically, if the customer is informed in writing that the vendor reserves the right to do so unless the customer expresses an objection, then yes.

Now if a vendor violates a legal agreement, or its rules for operating as a trusted entity, then legally and ethically, it would be wrong to sell information.  And the bigger picture is that much of the information that they are buying is actually given away free by us. How many of us shread every bill, statement or document with identifying information? How many of us toss old mail in the trash? How many of us carelessly leave personal info out for others to see?

I agree that if businesses are selling info without our consent and they are required to get our consent, then that is illegal.  If they are selling info without our consent and they are not required to get our consent, then that is unethical, but not illegal.  It reminds me of when my generation was in its teens. If a girl gave a guy her phone number, there was a chance he would pass it on to his buddies. The girl believed that her data sharing was limited to the guy, but unless the guy wanted her exclusively, then he tried to do a favor for his friends.  So all that to say is that expectations and agreements have to be crystal clear in writing with mutual acknowledgement when sharing data; for where there is no law, there is no sin - if there is no speed limit sign, then any speed is legal and ethical.

Broadway0474
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Information For Sale
Broadway0474   12/28/2016 11:15:45 PM
NO RATINGS
louis, you make a great point. The whole practice of selling "lists" has been around wayyyy before anything digital, and mass snail mail campaigns have not gone anywhere in this Era of SnapChat and Email. (In fact, some would argue that snail mail campaigns work as effectively as ever.) Then, as is now, there's a whole industry of companies making $$$ by brokering our personal information so that people can sell us crap.

Page 1 / 4   >   >>


Latest Blogs
Visualizations help communicate the meaning behind analytics to a variety of users. Now virtual reality is taking that a step further.
You've heard all about the data science talent gap that McKinsey cited in 2011, but there's a lot more -- including new information -- that you need to know about McKinsey's ongoing research. Learn more Thursday on All Analytics Radio.
What hybrid automobile offers the highest MPG? It's not the Prius anymore. Take a look at these visualizations to find out the new leader.
Understanding retail customers means knowing what they will want and when they will want it. To deliver that, retailers must be able to see customer behavior across physical stores, the web, mobile apps, and more.
Chatbots, AI, virtual reality, machine learning, and more will be featured as leading edge technologies for retailers attending the NRF Annual Convention and Expo in New York City. But many retailers are still getting their arms around advanced analytics.
Radio Show
A2 Conversations
ARCHIVE
Jessica Davis
Analytics: Make the Most of Data's Potential in 2017


1/19/2017  LISTEN   19
ARCHIVE
Jessica Davis
A2 Radio: Can You Trust Your Data?


12/20/2016  LISTEN   70
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Retail Analytics: See Where Style Meets Statistics


12/6/2016  LISTEN   53
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Why the IoT Matters to Your Business


11/29/2016  LISTEN   45
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Will Data and Humans Become Friends in 2017?


11/22/2016  LISTEN   40
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
We Can Build Smarter Cities


10/20/2016  LISTEN   31
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Visualization: Let Your Data Speak


10/13/2016  LISTEN   70
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How Colleges and Tech Are Grooming Analytics Talent


9/7/2016  LISTEN   56
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How Machine Learning Takes Handwriting Recognition to New Levels


8/25/2016  LISTEN   40
ARCHIVE
AllAnalytics
A Look at Tomorrow's Data Scientist


8/9/2016  LISTEN   83
Information Resources
Quick Poll
Quick Poll
About Us  |  Contact Us  |  Help  |  Register  |  Twitter  |  Facebook  |  RSS