Chicago Food Trucks, GPS & Data

Chicago's food truck ordinance holds a lesson in how data collection can be potentially harmful.
NO RATINGS
9/4/2012 |  8
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Anish
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Foodie rage
Anish   9/10/2012 11:22:18 AM
NO RATINGS
This will probably bring in another whole conversation of NYC Vs. Chicago probably haha!

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Foodie rage
BethSchultz   9/10/2012 11:19:17 AM
NO RATINGS
Interesting point Anish, and maybe! If food trucks are allowed in full force on the downtown streets perhaps the city would want to see if it can find correlations between availability and amount of trash!

Anish
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Foodie rage
Anish   9/10/2012 10:52:19 AM
NO RATINGS
@ Beth - Agreed. Do you think this would be an introduction to other issue like cleanliness and street maintenance, especially when you have chicago listed as one of the top downtowns in the country?

 

Anish
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Foodie rage
Anish   9/10/2012 10:47:44 AM
NO RATINGS
Pierre- Do you think there is behavorial data to perform segmentation of that sort to help determine the perfect geographic location for the establishment of these food courts? and If there is, curious to know what kind of metadata it would contain?

Pierre DeBois
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Foodie rage
Pierre DeBois   9/10/2012 10:15:00 AM
NO RATINGS
Anish and Beth,

The law reveals how segmentation gets ignorred - the customer who is walking up to a food truck is not the same as one who is walking into a restaurant. The Chicago Loop does have its share of fast food brick and mortar, but I don't recall New York lumping all lunch-going customers into a proximity decision such as this.  

Plus having an alternative nearby for a restaurant, or other services, is not a bad thing.  I recall from my time at Accion USA, a microfinance lender to small businesss, meeting a hair salon owner who salon was on a row of salon places. My manager noted that it made sense in some ways, since hair can take a long time. Someone with a backed up cue may send someone to a nearby rusted referral, which can be good business for the next time around. 

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Foodie rage
BethSchultz   9/10/2012 9:15:07 AM
NO RATINGS
@Anish, I love it! Like I said, I don't get downtown for lunch much so don't have a day-to-day need for a food cart. But I think we're missing in on some really cool stuff without the opportunity food carts bring to a city. I visited Phillie not too long ago and it has a thriving food cart industry downtown, which also is home to University of Pennsylvania and other small schools. Now if students could use their ID cards to purchase meals at a food cart that'd be something!

Anish
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Foodie rage
Anish   9/9/2012 1:02:28 AM
NO RATINGS
As a co chicagoan, I agree with Beth on the 200 ft rule. But irrespective of how it is exactly going to work, there are chains opening with this sole motive already. Look at this- http://chicagofoodcarts.com

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Foodie rage
BethSchultz   9/4/2012 5:32:09 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi Pierre, as a Chicagoan who works from a home office, I don't have the opportunity to lunch downtown too often. But I do have to wonder how realistic it is that mobile food vendors not park within 200 feet of an eating establishment. I mean, there are restaurants on virtually every block downtown. Even if the GPS data is faulty, does it really matter? Chances are if a food truck is parked on a downtown street it's breaking that 200-ft rule! Take a look at this graphic, compiled by the Institute for Justice, on how pervasive restaurants are downtown!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Latest Blogs
Three decades later, the much promised business aspect of a tech pro's job remains lacking.
Today's new data management paradigm seems more like a return to how things were done decades ago.
Analytics professionals still encounter executives who live by misconceptions when it comes to big data and analytics. Here are six examples of big data myths.
Robert maps out the path of the gasoline pipeline that ruptured last week, and which states might face gas shortages.
The SAS Government Leadership Forum takes place in October with experts addressing issues ranging from fight fraud today to the societal, economic, and geopolitical changes that will shape the world two decades from now.
Quick Poll
Quick Poll
Information Resources
Radio Show
A2 Conversations
UPCOMING
James M. Connolly
Visualization: Let Your Data Speak


10/13/2016   REGISTER   0
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How Colleges and Tech Are Grooming Analytics Talent


9/7/2016  LISTEN   56
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How Machine Learning Takes Handwriting Recognition to New Levels


8/25/2016  LISTEN   40
ARCHIVE
AllAnalytics
A Look at Tomorrow's Data Scientist


8/9/2016  LISTEN   83
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Analytics and the Making of a President


7/21/2016  LISTEN   76
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Analytics: Where We've Been, Where We're Going


7/12/2016  LISTEN   48
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How Predictive Analytics Can Take Your Company to the Next Level


6/28/2016  LISTEN   22
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
How Analytics Can Transform State Government


5/17/2016  LISTEN   51
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Save Labor Costs With Predictive Analytics


5/10/2016  LISTEN   53
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
What the IoT Means to You and Your Insurer


5/6/2016  LISTEN   75
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
When It's Time for a Robot's Job Review


4/27/2016  LISTEN   21
Infographic
Infographic
How Far We've Come With Analytics
You might be surprised by the progress that analytics have made in just the five years that All Analytics has been monitoring the field.
About Us  |  Contact Us  |  Help  |  Register  |  Twitter  |  Facebook  |  RSS