Punching Holes in Big-Data

Once upon a time, data had substance. You could touch it, feel it and, best of all, play with it.
NO RATINGS
1/29/2013 |  14
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Jeff
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: Well done!
Jeff   2/11/2013 12:07:28 PM
NO RATINGS
We need a post on the names given to Computer Professionals and thier departments.  I haven't heard "Data Processing" in 15 years. 

 

Will Big-Data change the game enought that we need to change the department name from IT to something else or will there bloom a new department?

Lyndon_Henry
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Well done!
Lyndon_Henry   2/7/2013 8:34:24 PM
NO RATINGS
..

Jeff writes


Second they never covered the what happens after we use the punch card in Computer Science classes.


 

I used 'em for bookmarks.  Oh ... remember books?  Anyway, lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots of punchcard bookmarks ... until I was getting smothered in bookmarks.  Well, I'm exaggerating.  But anyway, by that time, I was sick of punchcard bookmarks, and fortunately, the data-processing world was sick of punchcards.  Now I'm besieged by old floppy disks...

 

Jeff
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: Well done!
Jeff   2/5/2013 7:57:41 PM
NO RATINGS
Well, punch cards were harder to use in all respects, including finding mistakes.  But   you would have to be more careful from the outset for many reasons.  So I believe there were truely less mistakes to be found.

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Well done!
BethSchultz   2/5/2013 6:33:54 PM
NO RATINGS
Never having used punch cards, or their modern-age software equivalent for that matter, I have to ask -- with which is it easier to find where your mistakes have been made? 

Jeff
User Rank
Data Doctor
Re: Well done!
Jeff   2/5/2013 3:54:18 PM
NO RATINGS
One thing punch cards did do for you.  You had to get it right the first time.  They were hard to correct.  Like the typewriter to the MS Word times 10.  If your program failed, sometimes, you had to wait days to re-run, this would force you to be more careful.

Alexis
User Rank
Data Doctor
Filling time
Alexis   2/3/2013 2:21:34 PM
NO RATINGS
Interesting to see how people spent their time pre-social media days!

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Well done!
BethSchultz   2/1/2013 11:57:55 AM
NO RATINGS
They were re-using, alright -- but think of all the trees they killed in the first place. Whenever I hear "punch card" an immediate vision of all the CS and engineering students scurrying around campus with their big stacks of punch cards -- and I attending a big engineering school, so there were tons and tons of 'em. I was always vaguely intriqued and massively relieved that I didn't have to add a punch card stack to eveything I had to schlep across campus.

BethSchultz
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Punch card madness
BethSchultz   2/1/2013 11:54:05 AM
NO RATINGS
I was thinking about the environs around IBM headquarters -- all those good wives, secretaries, etc. -- crafting with the corporate goods.

 

Noreen Seebacher
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Well done!
Noreen Seebacher   2/1/2013 8:36:29 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks Pierre!

Noreen Seebacher
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Well done!
Noreen Seebacher   2/1/2013 8:36:12 AM
NO RATINGS
IDK Jeff...I once thought anything digital was "green" until I realized it still leaves a huge wake behind it.

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Latest Blogs
Take a step back and think about the dramatic changes in healthcare that data and analytics have driven or enabled. It isn't your grandmother's doctor with black bag on a housecall.
Analytics on the evolving smart grid take center stage next week at the Distributech 2016 conference in Orlando.
Recent breakthroughs by Realeyes allows for tracking of a person's emotional state based on a number of metrics related to their facial expression, all at a lower cost than existing kinesiology systems.
A new map of where Aedes mosquitoes have been reported could help biologists control those insects that carry the Zika virus.
An Oxford University scientist turned to advanced math to deflate some of the world's great conspiracy theories.
Radio Show
A2 Conversations
UPCOMING
James M. Connolly
See How Data is Revolutionizing Healthcare


2/25/2016   REGISTER   0
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
The Analytics Job and Salary Outlook for 2016


1/28/2016  LISTEN   16
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
See How Analytics Drive Change in the Retail World


1/7/2016  LISTEN   103
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
All Analytics Conversations: Forecasts for Analytics in 2016


12/18/2015  LISTEN   3
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Don't Make This Mistake With Big Data


12/11/2015  LISTEN   4
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Understand the Difference Between Data Science and Analytics


11/23/2015  LISTEN   30
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Shape the Next Generation of Data Scientists


10/20/2015  LISTEN   69
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Analytics Best Practices: Plan for the Human Factor


10/14/2015  LISTEN   117
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
See How Your Analytics Initiative Measures Up


9/24/2015  LISTEN   50
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Use Mobile Analytics to See the Big Picture


9/1/2015  LISTEN   83
ARCHIVE
James M. Connolly
Hire and Manage a Great Analytics Team


9/1/2015  LISTEN   152
Information Resources
Quick Poll
Quick Poll
About Us  |  Contact Us  |  Help  |  Register  |  Twitter  |  Facebook  |  RSS