Yelling Analytics in a Crowded Theater


“To everything there is a season.” The last time I heard these words from Ecclesiastes was in the context of my late father-in-law’s WWII Navy veterans group, which had to shut down its activities in 2010 as its last surviving members began to join their shipmates lost during the war itself. Nothing quite so dramatic for me, but the Value Alley has now enjoyed six of those seasons and the time has come for it, and me, to move on.

The USS Manley, ADP-1 (DD-74).
My father-in-law, Aaron Cruise, served
on this converted 'four-stacker'
destroyer in the Pacific theater.
The USS Manley, ADP-1 (DD-74).

My father-in-law, Aaron Cruise, served

on this converted "four-stacker"

destroyer in the Pacific theater.

As I mentioned last time, I’m not going far -- more like changing the channel than changing my address. For the foreseeable future I’ll be found over at SAS Voices, cranking out just as many marvelous meditations, inspirational insights and brilliant baloney as before. (My first post is already up: Lifelong learning and analytics).

When asked why I chose to pursue this blogging endeavor, I answer with two reasons. The first was to use the blog as a safe place to try out new ideas and get comments and feedback, before committing them to more permanent status such as in a white paper or customer presentation; a place I could make mistakes and learn from them. As I tell my colleagues considering getting into the blogging business, “It’s just a blog!”

And I have learned. A lot. From many. I thank you all. I look back at some of my early stuff and just cringe, wishing I could delete it permanently, unfortunately not something the Internet permits. More often, though, my opinions and approaches have evolved incrementally. In fact, if over the course of six years they hadn’t, then something’s seriously wrong with my ego and my ability to adapt and grow.

The second and primary purpose of the blog, was, as today’s title says, to “yell analytics in a crowded theater”. Six years ago both myself and the market were still waking up to analytics. Data hadn’t gotten all that big yet, and the IoT was still mostly just the “I” part. My primary audience was the Office of Finance, where building a spreadsheet qualified as doing analytics. The business ops side was a bit more advanced, but as I was to discover, certain no-brainers like inventory and logistics optimization were still not mainstream. The Value Alley was designed to build analytic awareness, and in my case, simultaneously emphasize the value.

How quickly things change. Lately, when I chair a conference, attend a trade show or speak with prospects, I’ve noticed that the question asked has shifted dramatically from, “What can analytics do for me?” to “How do I get started?” BI and analytics implementations are now the number three priority for CIOs, behind only cybersecurity and ERP.

There’s no need to yell any longer -- the theater has cleared out. But they’ve not gone home, they’ve gone to work -- to work on analytics.

This content was reposted from the SAS Value Alley. Go there to read the original post.

Leo Sadovy, Performance Management Marketing, SAS

Leo Sadovy handles marketing for Performance Management at SAS, which includes the areas of budgeting, planning and forecasting, activity-based management, strategy management, and workforce analytics. He advocates for SAS’s best-in-class analytics capability into the offices of finance across all industry sectors. Before joining SAS, he spent seven years as Vice President of Finance for Business Operations for a North American division of Fujitsu, managing a team focused on commercial operations, customer and alliance partnerships, strategic planning, process management, and continuous improvement. During his 13-year tenure at Fujitsu, he developed and implemented the ROI model and processes used in all internal investment decisions, and also held senior management positions in finance and marketing.

Prior to Fujitsu, Sadovy was with Digital Equipment Corp. for eight years in sales and financial management. He started his management career in laser optics fabrication for Spectra-Physics and later moved into a finance position at the General Dynamics F-16 fighter plant in Fort Worth, Texas. He has an MBA in Finance and a Bachelor’s degree in Marketing. He and his wife Ellen live in North Carolina with their three college-age children, and among his unique life experiences he can count a run for US Congress and two singing performances at Carnegie Hall.

Big: Data, Model, Quality and Variety

A fresh look at big data. It's time to apply "big" not just to the data, but to the model, quality, and variety.

Yelling Analytics in a Crowded Theater

Leo Sadovy reflects on six years of writing his Value Alley blog for SAS and how analytics have matured over those same years.


Re: Still here?
  • 7/31/2016 9:21:21 AM
NO RATINGS

I look forward to Leo's posts, too!  SAS's move reflects how content has to be managed differently over time.

Re: Still here?
  • 6/30/2016 8:00:15 PM
NO RATINGS

I look forward to the new outcomes from the changes, Leo.  It will be great to learn how the new thought leadership under SAS Voices come to be.

Re: Still here?
  • 6/19/2016 8:35:25 AM
NO RATINGS

Everything changes and most always for the better in the long run. How true how "the question asked has shifted dramatically from, "What can analytics do for me?" to "How do I get started?" And what better thing to happen now as folks dig in and start learning just how to begin analytics.

Re: Still here?
  • 6/5/2016 12:40:10 PM
NO RATINGS

Yes, lots of big companies (and SAS competitors) are extremely challenged by how to handle and present this kind of content rationally. Thanks for the heads-up, Leo, and good to know we'll still be reading you here at All Analytics.

Re: Still here?
  • 6/3/2016 8:08:33 PM
NO RATINGS

Moving all blog content to a central hub sounds like a great move for SAS. It's good to see companies like SAS learn from experience and make changes like that -- even if it means your word count is a little lower. 

I'm glad All Analytics has become a place of discussion around your posts. I know a lot of us look forward to your columns each month.

Re: Still here?
  • 6/3/2016 4:49:59 PM

Yes, we're happy to keep posting Leo's content. Glad to have it.

 

Re: Still here?
  • 6/3/2016 1:37:38 PM
NO RATINGS

That will be up to the editors of All Analytics, as it always has been - it's been at their discretion and pleasure whether or not my SAS posts are republished here, and will continue to be so.  It's been my privilege to have been regularly included by All Analytics and hopefully my content will continue to prove insightful, entertaining and worthy. 

At SAS we're consolidating our "thought leadership" blogs into one focal point, "SAS Voices", and in my new role in developing our internal thought leadership program it's only proper that I lead by example and move my posts over.  And now I don't have the pressure of maintaining the regular every-two-week cadence necessary to keep a stand-alone blog alive and well.  Additionally, I suspect the editors of SAS Voices will prompt me to keep my posts a little shorter and more concise, something everyone, including me, will benefit from.

Thanks for the note of appreciation- sometimes you wonder if anyone is out there - but I will say I get 10X the comments and interaction here on All Analytics compared with the stand-alone blog site - this is where the interested and engaged audience is!

Leo

Still here?
  • 6/3/2016 1:03:24 PM
NO RATINGS

Leo - You're moving to another SAS blog, will your content still appear here? I always enjoy your columns on All Analytics. 

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