How Analytics Can Help You Find That Dream Job


If your dream job is out there, analytics may help you find it. That’s the premise behind a job site that launched in April. Path.To seeks to get beyond the résumé and job description match in attempting to bring together employees and employers into a compatible relationship.

Path.To bills itself as the online dating site for the IT job market. In fact, its tagline is “Fall In Love With Your Next Job.” We’ve discussed the analytics of online dating; in this case, the algorithms for compatibility are geared toward helping a computer engineer zero in on the company that offers the best fit for ambition, culture, flexibility, and life choices.

The site’s distinguishing feature is its “Path.To Score,” with a maximum rank of 99 for the ideal state of harmony between what the job seeker wants and what the position offers. Path.To explains: “We analyze your skills & expertise, personality, interests and passions to determine your compatibility with the jobs on Path.To.”

As truly learning about a person usually requires more than a static snapshot, Path.To presents a dynamic and adaptive system: “Recommended job opportunities are delivered in a ranked order that continually evolves, based on your taste.”

Path.To doesn't only rely on a list of preferences. "We really want to understand where this person is in their life," Path.To founder Darren Bounds told Business Insider.

When you register for a Path.To account, you get the option of using your Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Google+ profiles. The company recommends signing up using a social network so it can better tailor content to the job seeker's needs. While this does make sense, particularly with respect to the professionally-oriented LinkedIn, signing up through a social network also is about giving Path.To a sense of what you share and how you are connected so that it can get a better understanding of where you fit in.

However, this poses a real threat to an individual's privacy. In the Business Insider piece, Bounds elaborates on what Path.To wants to know about job seekers:

Are they a fresh college graduate, single and ready to take on the world? Do they have a family or do they have plans to have a new baby soon? Those are really important signals in the job-search process.

True, these are all questions that individuals should consider when assessing whether a company offers a good fit for where they plan to be in the short and long term. Nevertheless, legally, this is none of an employer’s business. Path.To will have to meet the challenge of gathering as much information as it can to ensure compatibility without compromising the privacy of its applicants and without serving as a filter for companies that prefer not to hire people whose plans, for example, include a baby in the near future.

So long as Path.To keeps private information private, the insights should help people have a clearer picture of what they want and what companies can offer them when going into job interviews. It doesn’t guarantee that they will get or accept job offers, but analytics would definitely put the odds in their favors.

Would you use Path.To for your next job search? Share your thoughts below.

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Ariella Brown,

Ariella Brown is a social media consultant, editor, and freelance writer who frequently writes about the application of technology to business. She holds a PhD in English from the City University of New York. Her Twitter handle is @AriellaBrown.

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Re: Resume Analyzing and Personal Information
  • 6/18/2012 12:11:17 PM
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@ckelly1 You're right that it says just "Google," but given the context, which aligns it with LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook, one can infer that they mean the social media profile and not a peek into every search you do. 

Re: Resume Analyzing and Personal Information
  • 6/18/2012 11:32:21 AM
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Ariella. I guess I am confused when they state "know who you are on google"..that could mean everything..and that is how they phrase it..no mention of Google+ only.

Re: Resume Analyzing and Personal Information
  • 6/18/2012 10:17:57 AM
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@ckelly1 By signing in with your Google ID, you're not transfering the data on all your Google searches but on your connections and posts on Google+.  Path.to says that information gives it better insight into job applicants for better job matches. It's not supposed to give all that information to the employer. But you should always be aware that whatever you do on FB, Twitter, or Google+ may become public knowledge even if you only share on a limited basis. 

Re: Resume Analyzing and Personal Information
  • 6/18/2012 10:10:46 AM
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Ariella.  Sorry I missed that, I don't recall every have been asked to give permission to see what I do on google.  It may not be published, but if I am looking for a job, the last thing I want is for a potential employer to Possibly know what I "google".  I also don't want any organization having access to my contacts.  They way they phrase it is very vague and gives them alot of latitude.  

Re: Resume Analyzing and Personal Information
  • 6/18/2012 9:48:45 AM
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@ckelly1 Yes, I mentioned that. They want to see your contacts, as well as your posts to get more data on your interests. I don't believe they would post anything under a person's name; that's the usual notification for agreeing to sign in with an established profile. 

Re: Resume Analyzing and Personal Information
  • 6/18/2012 9:26:04 AM
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Looks like an interesting site..but I just want to make people aware that not only do they request information on your job history from you, but if they can they want you to sign in with your credentials from other Social Media Sites.  When I tried to log in wiith my Google account..they wanted permission to Manage your contacts, View and manage your Google Contacts,Know who you are on Google, Perform these operations when I'm not using the application. 

Re: Resume Analyzing
  • 6/18/2012 7:25:33 AM
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@Daniel, sure you can upload a fake resume with skill sets you don't possess. You can do that for any job. But it really would be pointless to obtain an interview for a job you cannot do. You'd just be wasting your own time, as well as that of the interviewer. 

Re: Before the job...
  • 6/18/2012 7:24:15 AM
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@Seth Path.to embraces the association of its site with online dating. As you point out, though, we know (and have the  report --http://www.psychologicalscience.org/pdf/PSPI-online_dating-proof.pdf -- that shows)  dating sites do not necessarily hold up to scientific rigor.  Still I think it iwould actually be easier to match people with jobs than with mates because the facts there are more easily quantifiable -- level of pay, benefit, policies, record for promotion, vacation time, level of formality, management style, openness to ideas, even the way the work space is laid out can all be ascertained in advance to know if that is the type of place you'd be comfortable at.  And while people do have more to them than the sum of their data, Path.to does seem to acknowledge that, which is why they feel they can learn more about you over time with access to social media profiles. 

Re: Measuring success?
  • 6/18/2012 1:47:30 AM
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1 saves

Louis, I don't know how they are checking but it's true. Now most of the companies have global clients and has to handle very sensitive datas. Suppose if the client is a financial company, the employee has to handle customers account details, credit card information's etc. So the companies has to make sure about employees back ground, behavior etc before recruiting for such post. But best part is, then also lots of such fraudulent things are happening.

Re: Resume Analyzing
  • 6/18/2012 1:36:48 AM
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1 saves

Ariella, am not getting how it's possible. The user can put all the fake things both in data fields and resume.  The analysis is going to happen based on these input validated datas and not on actual facts. So the best out of the fake can be the outputs. I mean a crooked fellow can cheat the tool/software in a cunning way. The only possible way is it can help whether the inputs are adhere to certain pre determined combinations like embedded ASIC/FPGA developer has to use  IC platforms rather than C/C++ compilers.

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