Facial Analytics: What Are You Smiling at?


Michael Steinhart, Contributing Editor

Michael Steinhart has been covering IT and business computing for 15 years, tracking the rising popularity of virtualization, unified fabric, high-performance computing, and cloud infrastructures. He is editor of The Enterprise Cloud Site, which won the Least Imaginative Site Name award in 2012, and he managed TheITPro.com, a community of IT professionals taking their first steps into cloud computing. From 2006 to 2012, Steinhart worked as an executive editor at Ziff Davis Enterprise, writing and managing research reports, whitepapers, case studies, magazine features, e-newsletters, blog posts, online videos, and podcasts. He also moderated and presented in dozens of webinars and virtual tradeshows. He got his start in IT journalism at CMP Media back in 1998, then moved to PC Magazine, managing the popular Solutions section and then covering business technology and consumer software. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in communications/journalism from Ramapo College of New Jersey.

Biosensors, Robots Replacing Human Guards

In prisons and other security settings, electronic devices are predicting and detecting anomalous behavior with high accuracy and reducing the need for human personnel.

Questioning the Ethics of Learning Analytics

Schools around the country are weighing the benefits and ethical questions of learning analytics.


Re: Like minds
  • 3/17/2014 5:31:52 PM
NO RATINGS

Well, that's interesting -- I'm here, but I'm too cool to really be here and I've got far more interesting things to via Google Glass than participate with you people. The New Elitism is born. 

Re: Like minds
  • 3/16/2014 5:09:25 PM
NO RATINGS

..

Beth asks


...Why does this woman feel the need to wear Google Glass everywhere she goes, including to bars? The piece notes that she's a social media strategist. I wonder if it's something she's doing in line with her job, whether she just likes the experience, or whether she just likes to call attention to herself.


 

Or possibly she's engaging in what I perceive as the increasing use of electronic devices to embrace a disengagement and alientation from the here-and-now social environment. Glass sorta takes you to the next level in this process...

 

Glass surveillance & recording implications
  • 3/16/2014 5:04:42 PM
NO RATINGS

..

Michael writes (re: someone recording a scene with Google Glass):


... isn't it the same as bystanders shooting video with their handhelds? That sort of footage has become de rigeur for news outlets.

I guess when you see someone wearing Google Glass, treat them as if they were holding up their cameras or phones.


 

There's a somewhat more surreptitious quality to wearing Glass, and that may be partially what bothers people to the point of anger — an intrusion of the sneaky surveillance that much of the public is now aware of.

Also, there's a big difference between recording, say, a street scene (like an accident or something), and the scene inside a bar or other establishment.

I think the ease of use and low profile of Glass raise a lot of new implications that our society has not encountered before. However, I expect even more surreptitious forms of electronic devices capable of recording audio and video to start becoming more accessible to the general public. After all, tiny "hidden cameras" have been in use by the news media for years.

 

Re: Like minds
  • 3/14/2014 3:01:57 PM
NO RATINGS

I agree. But at the same time, isn't it the same as bystanders shooting video with their handhelds? That sort of footage has become de rigeur for news outlets.

I guess when you see someone wearing Google Glass, treat them as if they were holding up their cameras or phones.

Re: Like minds
  • 3/14/2014 1:53:19 PM
NO RATINGS

After watching the video clip, I have a few questions. 1). Why does this woman feel the need to wear Google Glass everywhere she goes, including to bars? The piece notes that she's a social media strategist. I wonder if it's something she's doing in line with her job, whether she just likes the experience, or whether she just likes to call attention to herself.

2). What are the privacy implications for the individuals this woman captured via Glass and then shared with the news media? 

3) Is the media outlet responsible for obtaining permission from the individuals in the videos taken by Glass and shared by the Glass user? This is not like knowing a news camera is in the bar rolling and deliberately getting into the shot.

Lastly, I'd say that Google needs to do a better job of explaining Glass to the general public before these devices become generally available and in widespread use. The last thing it should want on its hands is violence resulting from Glass use.

Re: Like minds
  • 3/14/2014 9:18:45 AM
NO RATINGS

..

Beth writes


But, honestly, I hope we don't see Glass use widespread for many years to come. I've never seen anybody wearing Glass glasses in real life, but I'm sure it'll be disconcerting when I do.


 

You can see a real-life example, plus a report of the consequences, in my recent posting Google Glass sparks brawl in SF bar.

This is one of a number of recent indications of growing public discomfort and even animosity toward the privacy intrusion represented by Glass (and probably other techno devices that push this envelope).

 

Re: Like minds
  • 3/12/2014 11:30:31 PM
NO RATINGS

I haven't actually seen anyone wearing google glass in this part of the world yet. Before reading this article I wouldn't have given much thought to it but now that I know the possibility of being observed it makes me uncomfortable. I will watch out for google glass wearers.

Re: Like minds
  • 3/12/2014 12:47:08 PM
NO RATINGS

Michael, that is interesting re: Glass-wearing New Yorkers. I would have anticipated seeing a lot in San Francisco/Google HQ but not necessarily NYC... yet. That was silly of me. I don't get out to the streets of downtown Chicago during the week, working as I do from home, so I'm not sure what I'd see among the urban professionals here. Wearing Google Glasses seems rather pretentious to me and we're so much more down to earth here than there, so I'm guessing not. ;-)

As for the Volkswagen commercial... right. What is up with that?!

 

Re: Like minds
  • 3/12/2014 12:40:00 PM
NO RATINGS

Here in New York, I see at least one or two people per week wearing Google Glass. And on an unrelated subject, I thought about it overnight and had a chance to re-watch just now -- all the "German engineers" in the Volkswagen commercial are men. What's up with that?

Re: Like minds
  • 3/12/2014 12:28:54 PM
NO RATINGS

I don't know Michael, but if the latter is the case, I'll have my scowl at the ready. (But, honestly, I hope we don't see Glass use widespread for many years to come. I've never seen anybody wearing Glass glasses in real life, but I'm sure it'll be disconcerting when I do.)

Page 1 / 3   >   >>
INFORMATION RESOURCES
ANALYTICS IN ACTION
CARTERTOONS
VIEW ALL +
QUICK POLL
VIEW ALL +