Telematics Highlight Benefits of Analytics


In a post Edward Snowden world, explaining how big data analytics is different from government snooping tactics is no mean feat, whether you're trying to break it down for a CEO, middle-manager, or individual. Even if you do come up with an argument that speaks to one of them, it's unlikely to resonate with another.

No student is going to care about the benefits of CCTV footage analysis of customer foot traffic.

However, one aspect of the analytics industry that not only can help a lot of different people, but do it in a way they can all understand, is telematics. As it stands, these combination tracking, navigation, messaging, and analytical hardware and software packages are revolutionizing industries, jobs, and the lives of individuals in a way that few other analytics platforms can.

The reason it's able to be this broad, where so many other analytics uses are so specific, is because of the myriad benefits it can bring. The same type of smartphone application that lets a fleet manager keep track of where his vehicles are at all times, can be used to make a young driver far less of a risk for an insurer and can therefore allow them to reduce premiums.

At the very top end of things, you have companies like Toshiba, which recently announced that across its entire business, it has managed to cut fuel usage by 27% thanks to telematics. That's the kind of figure that the top people in any enterprise or corporation can understand.

And, that goes double when you factor in all of the green "brownie points" it will net that same firm, taking away one less ache for the company head.

At a more middle level, fleet managers can have their lives transformed by the technology, as not only can they send the nearest worker to a job site, but they can spot the drivers that are ruining their quarterly numbers with out-of-hours vehicle usage, or driving so erratically that it leads to vehicle damage.

These applications can also cut back on insurance fraud cases and instances of thievery, since telematics by nature offers tracking if a vehicle is stolen, allowing for quick recovery.

Individuals, too, can understand the simple benefits of having their insurance premiums reduced, but it goes beyond that. Telematics can offer peace of mind to parents that are worried about not only where their child goes when they've passed their test, but how they get there. With even the simplest of telematics applications, they can track their driving habits.

Those metrics then can be compared with that of other drivers to spit out a score based on their driving safety, making it even easier to understand.

This is why telematics is such an exciting technology. Not just because of all the benefits it can bring, but with the ease that it incorporates into our daily lives. It's a technology that can sell analytics as a principle, rather than an individual scenario and that will likely go a lot further in the years to come.

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Jon Martindale, Technology Journalist

Jon Martindale is a technology journalist and hardware reviewer, having been covering new developments in the field for most of his professional career. In that time he's tested the latest and greatest releases from the big hardware companies of the world, as well as writing about new software releases, industry movements,and Internet activism.

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Re: Fine line
  • 11/25/2014 5:29:34 PM
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The absense of Google+ is expected. That platform hasn't really taken off despite its higher quality presentation: ad-free, with sleek, simplistic menus.

That being said, I still check my Facebook with decent regularity, as my Google+ account continues to collect virtual dust.

I know that I would have no business going on CocoCola.com, but could easily Like the page due to a promotion in my newsfeed. If the website released the same promotion, millions would never hear of it. Having your own website appears now to be more of a checklist item, where as the social media accounts have far more influence.

Re: Fine line
  • 11/24/2014 2:22:41 AM
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I also find it interesting that Google Plus prospectives were not mentioned.  I think every few years audience will shift, but only by so much.

Re: Fine line
  • 11/24/2014 2:20:25 AM
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Candido,

I don't know if websites are forgone compared to social media. Forrester relased a study which states that Twitter and Facebook have peaked and questions their overall influence for commerce.  I know Facebook has been debated for a few years - most companies that offer unique content are successful. But this was the first time the study noted both major platforms.  Ultimate;ly the argument can be made for companies managing their own communities to gain significant ROI.

Re: Fine line
  • 11/10/2014 12:04:01 PM
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We're in an age where Facebook likes and Twitter followers are legitimate metrics used in Marketing. Even websites are forgone in the face of social media.

Re: Vanishing privacy
  • 11/1/2014 12:17:18 PM
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..

Pierre writes


I also think introductions such as Ford brings an opportunity for us as a society to question when surveillance really is not valuable.


 

The issue of on-the-job surveillance, even detecting eye movements behind sunglasses, as well as personal activities, is raised in the Readerboard article I just published about the growing deployment of facial recognition/eye-movement detection technology in railway locomotive cabs.

I suspect that this may be the camel's nose under the tent, with the possibility of using such technology in more widespread applications to keep tabs on employee behavior in the workplace...

 

Re: Vanishing privacy
  • 10/31/2014 11:25:30 PM
NO RATINGS

Paranoia accepted, Lyndon.  Telematics will highten the debate about data ownership, particularly as IoT-related information like health data from fitness apps become more widely adopted.

Re: Vanishing privacy
  • 10/31/2014 11:20:33 PM
NO RATINGS

I also think introductions such as Ford brings an opportunity for us as a society to question when surveillance really is not valuable.

Re: Vanishing privacy
  • 10/31/2014 11:18:13 PM
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This post on Ford's Police Inceptor vehicles for police departments is highlighting how telematics will provide surveillance on how officers drive.  It is meant to give a safer environment, though I do think it does raise questions about whether the surveillance is truely needed. 

 

http://www.technologytell.com/in-car-tech/10748/ford-co-develops-telematics-tech-focused-cop-cars/

Re: Vanishing privacy
  • 10/29/2014 1:25:07 PM
NO RATINGS

..

Jim writes


 Sadly, I think I'm with you on the privacy in telematics issue. I don't believe that insurance companies, police, and others have any plans to give us "privacy" when it comes to the data that our cars generate. Their attitude is likely to be that if we don't consent we can't drive.

Some cars have had "black boxes" in them for several years now and they are being used by investigators to identify how fast a car was going, how it turned and braked, etc., before an accident. I can't recall what the schedule is for such monitors in all cars, but it's on the way. It's a fairly short leap from there to the insurance company analyzing your car's data as part of your annual renewal. Definitely going to happen? Maybe not, but probable.

As a society we won't really resist. We'll howl a bit but then buckle.


 

... And extending this a bit further ... We now have available personal body/health monitoring devices that provide and (can communicate) one's heartbeat, pulse, blood pressure, temperature, and other body data. How long before insurance companies start nudging us to purchase the new AppleBody that monitors all of this stuff bplus caloric intake, type of foods eaten, alcohol consumption, etc., etc., and communicates it conveniently to one's health professionals and especially to one's insurance company? They'll start by sweetening your acceptance with a slightly lowered insurance premium, then somehow make it mandatory ... or maybe a revised ACA will make it mandatory? (That would assume a non-gridlocked Washington, which is a long shot...)

Anyway, just paranoiaizing...

 

Re: Vanishing privacy
  • 10/28/2014 11:48:43 AM
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The scary thing with that is that even with privacy in place they could paint with a wide brush and do some damage. 

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