Where Do Hurricanes Strike Florida? (110 Years of Data)


Robert Allison, The Graph Guy!, SAS

Robert Allison has worked at SAS for more than 20 years and is perhaps the foremost expert in creating custom graphs using SAS/GRAPH. His educational background is in computer science, and he holds a BS, MS, and PhD from North Carolina State University. He is the author of several conference papers, has won a few graphic competitions, and has written a book calledSAS/GRAPH: Beyond the Basics.

What Cities are in Hurricane Irma's Path?

Here's an example of using data and visualization to look at weather -- specifically, the possible path of Hurricane Irma. Does your city need to get ready?

Mapping Out the Next Robot Invasion

Where are all the robots today? Here's a look at a better data visualization to represent where in the US all the robots are.


Re: Better visual but still missing some important data
  • 9/22/2017 11:30:35 PM
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In the current environment, nothing would really shock me, our climate is changing and the hurricanes are representing that change. I can only hope and pray for those in the path of the storm. the loss of life and destruction is simply devastating. We have still not recovered after Sandy.

Re: Better visual but still missing some important data
  • 9/22/2017 11:23:41 PM
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@maryam: Indeed, the preparedness in the NY/NJ area and much of the northeast for hurricanes and tropical storms is akin to the preparedness of the south for snow.

Similarly, up here in the northeast, snow's a fact of life -- and in FL, Irma notwithstanding, hurricanes and tropical storms are a fact of life (for many who aren't RIGHT on the water, the attitude is along the lines of "Wake me if it's a Category 3" -- an exaggeration, but not by a whole heckuvalot).

Re: Better visual but still missing some important data
  • 9/22/2017 11:21:24 PM
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@SaneIT: Well, that's the thing. Central FL is kind of "the coast", too -- because of the Everglades, Lake Okeechobee, and other inland waters.

Re: Better visual but still missing some important data
  • 9/22/2017 10:41:16 PM
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Its probably sound advice I lived through Sandy in New Jersey and Irene, both not technically hurricanes and the implications were significant. Many roadways were closed for weeks due to damage from flooding. Train stations were flooded that served metropolitan areas, power was out almost two weeks one time and 4 days another. A snowstorm hit  after Sandy and people were freezing. Many of my relatives weathered Irma in Floridas and life returned to normal for them within a few days. As Maria makes its way through Puerto Rico we will, unfortunately, be telling stories about weathering the storm again. It has been quite a month for a natural disaster. We can only hope it's over now.

Re: Better visual but still missing some important data
  • 9/22/2017 5:39:58 PM
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..

SaneIT writes

... I could see my wants as the focus of a different map, I just see the impact of a hurricane as more than the landfall. 

Definitely, as we know well in Central Texas. Harvey circled around inland (Victoria, Tx area) and during its mischief, it dumped enough rain just east of here to break flood-level records on the Colorado River and damage or destroy many swaths of homes (I don't have the number to hand). We're hours away from the Gulf Coast.

And:

Your comment about building bunkers rather than parking a mobile home is obvious but if you look at the keys or any of the coastal communities you'd be surprised how many homes even if not mobile were built in the 50s -70s, wood framed and are still standing.

I certainly hope so. My former mother-in-law (of deceased wife) lived in a mobile home on Key Largo, just across a road from the beach.

..

Re: Better visual but still missing some important data
  • 9/22/2017 8:20:55 AM
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@Broadway0474, sometimes that's easier said than done.  At one point it was taking 48 hours for residents of South Florida to get out of the state.  Traffic and fuel shortages didn't help that at all.  Then for those that are not central FL residents many of us who stayed were witness to a very odd shift in the storm.   Between  12-1AM the storm's path shifted dramatically from all of the forecast models and it put us right in the middle of the storm.  Had it stayed the course 50 miles West of us damages would have been greatly reduced in our area.  Because FL is not a very wide state any hurricane that makes landfall is apt to affect the whole state in some way and we can't evacuate the entire state when a storm is coming so we create little bunkers and hope for the best.  

Re: Better visual but still missing some important data
  • 9/21/2017 8:56:37 PM
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I once had an insurance adjuster friend of mine tell me that you always want to get out of the way of a hurricane. And after a n earthquake, its best to get out of the area --- what with fires following, creaky buildings and aftershocks.

Re: Better visual but still missing some important data
  • 9/21/2017 10:22:52 AM
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@SaneIT, I hear you! I don't believe we can ever be ready for natural catastrophy but anticipating the most likely is as good as it gets. I don't know about you, but my experience tells me that I will usually get other than the anticipated and almost never the most likely.

Re: Better visual but still missing some important data
  • 9/21/2017 8:29:38 AM
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I'm not sure if a fault line or a hurricane track model gives you more time to prepare or a better indicator of what is on the way.  I know I hear a lot about the possibility of an earthquake based on seismic data but it doesn't seem as sure as being able to see a storm coming.  I also wonder which is easier to build and prepare for, earthquakes do a lot of structural damage but how often are those buildings that existed before modern building codes?  I'd rather not pick, can we just find a way to build flying cities like on the Jetsons?

Re: Better visual but still missing some important data
  • 9/20/2017 4:53:33 PM
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Building codes get upgraded as more is learned from each passing occurance, but it only applies to new construction. The old structures if not too badly damaged get patched up and out of mind until the next time. I'm in California so no hurricane worries here, but earthquakes are our game. Same senerio. Florida tracks paths, we monitor fault lines. Pick your poison.

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