Where Do Hurricanes Strike Florida? (110 Years of Data)


Robert Allison, The Graph Guy!, SAS

Robert Allison has worked at SAS for more than 20 years and is perhaps the foremost expert in creating custom graphs using SAS/GRAPH. His educational background is in computer science, and he holds a BS, MS, and PhD from North Carolina State University. He is the author of several conference papers, has won a few graphic competitions, and has written a book calledSAS/GRAPH: Beyond the Basics.

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Re: Better visual but still missing some important data
  • 9/19/2017 7:18:42 AM
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..

SaneIT writes that "Strikes are nice to know but the path of the storm is just as important when it comes to FL since the peninsula is so narrow. "

I agree, but in my opinion that should be a focus of a different map, perhaps showing cumulative color-coded hurricane paths up the peninsula.

I find it interesting and informative to readily see the intensity of hurricane strikes along the Florida coast. This is where hurricanes make landfall with the greatest force, and where you might want to construct your house as a massive reinforced concrete bunker rather than, say, a mobile home.

The second map, with more useful info, is definitely my preference, but I'd suggest the use of "transparent" colors to let the city names peek through has not worked so well. I'd suggest just overlaying the city names in plain print over the colored areas. I think they'd be a lot more readable, wouldn't increase clutter, and the map would actually come out looking sharper and cleaner.

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Re: Better visual but still missing some important data
  • 9/18/2017 1:30:11 PM
NO RATINGS

@SaneIT:

> 2004

I presume you're on the West Coast, then? Charley was pretty nasty, depending upon where you were, and pretty benign, also depending upon where you were.

It's interesting that after Charley and Wilma, the state legislature leapt to make new laws (and badly written ones, IMHO; I know because I analyzed the bill at the time) on BC/DR and building codes for high rises. A bit reactionary, though. 

Where and how
  • 9/18/2017 1:26:09 PM
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Thanks for doing this analysis. FL gets a bad rap on hurricanes but it's really only certain areas that are prone to them. (FL is a pretty big state, after all.)

Moreover, it's HOW the hurricane hits. Some counties may have small to medium numbers of hurricanes, but even those numbers are mitigated further by the fact that most of the hurricanes to impact that area "grazed" those areas -- thus doing very little damage beyond coastal areas.

Better visual but still missing some important data
  • 9/18/2017 8:40:48 AM
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Strikes are nice to know but the path of the storm is just as important when it comes to FL since the peninsula is so narrow.  I've been in central FL about 14 years and in 2004 we were hit hard by 3 storms.  They took turns on which coast they came from but they walked right through the middle of the state.  The point that a hurricane makes landfall is important but in the terms of property damage and casualties that is only part of the story.  A storm that hits Miami and turns back out to the Atlantic will do much less damage than one that runs up the coast and stays on land until it dissipates or one that turns and runs up the spine of the peninsula. 

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