IoT Happily Steps into Background


James M. Connolly, Editor of All Analytics

Jim Connolly is a versatile and experienced technology journalist who has reported on IT trends for more than two decades. As editor of All Analytics he writes about the move to big data analytics and data-driven decision making. Over the years he has covered enterprise computing, the PC revolution, client/server, the evolution of the Internet, the rise of web-based business, and IT management. He has covered breaking industry news and has led teams focused on product reviews and technology trends. Throughout his tech journalism career, he has concentrated on serving the information needs of IT decision-makers in large organizations and has worked with those managers to help them learn from their peers and share their experiences in implementing leading-edge technologies through publications including Computerworld. Jim also has helped to launch a technology-focused startup, as one of the founding editors at TechTarget, and has served as editor of an established news organization focused on technology startups and the Boston-area venture capital sector at MassHighTech. A former crime reporter for the Boston Herald, he majored in journalism at Northeastern University.

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Re: No, really... stop believing
  • 9/14/2017 11:27:04 PM
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kq4ym, humans' propensity to buy into hype knows no bounds, or at least no history. It is no wonder that history is littered with booms and busts, bubbles and bursts. People are gullible and greedy and like to follow and be followed. Depressing, sure. But the first step to fixing the problem is recognizing it.

Re: No, really... stop believing
  • 9/6/2017 1:01:12 PM
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Privacy regulations tilt the playing field in favor of the larger players.

A start-up could do the technical development of a gee-whiz IoT device. But who wants to trust them with the most intimate data of your business or home?

Amazon, or a small number of other large players, don't have the same problem. When you're ordering that thing you need to get by Tuesday, and a big screen of small print pops up, what will you do? You click "Agree" before you've even read any of it. And so do 9 out of 10 people, at least.

So Amazon just puts whatever they need in that legal agreement, and they continue to do whatever they like with our data. Nobody seems to mind, as long as the package will get here on Tuesday.

 

Re: No, really... stop believing
  • 9/6/2017 9:39:03 AM
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As in most advertising and public relations work, the more you repeat your message the more readers will tend to believe it's true. Hopefully, news and marketing reports will state the truth to the best the present knowlege will permit. But, hype is not always easy to spot until sometimes it's too late and the message has caught on with too many, making it difficult to change some minds after that.

Re: No, really... stop believing
  • 9/5/2017 12:26:01 PM
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@PC that's true. In effect, many of us were already sharing some of that data by using loyalty cards for grocery and drug stores

Re: No, really... stop believing
  • 9/5/2017 11:23:52 AM
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I agree with Terry that IoT has fewer barriers in the industrial environment, but I don't think it stops there.

If Amazon could reduce your grocery bill by 10%, keep your fridge stocked with what you like, and help you eat the way you want to; what's a little privacy? Most people have already given their information to Amazon anyway (And Google and Facebook)

Re: No, really... stop believing
  • 9/5/2017 9:08:40 AM
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< believe the IoT will thrive in industrial environments because it can leapfrog most the privacy concerns and contain the end-to-end security issues better. >

@Terry do you see that as a universal outcome? Would stricter European regulations on privacy have a hampering effect on industrial IoT in countries that comply with their standards?

Re: No, really... stop believing
  • 9/5/2017 9:02:31 AM
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@Lyndon_Henry I just saw this on City lab and thought of you: "Mapping the Ebb and Flow of Transit Around the World "/transportation/2017/09/visualize-transit-frequency-nearly-anywhere-in-the-world/538725/?utm_source=SFTwitter

 

It includes this video: 

 

San Francisco Transit Flows from Will Geary on Vimeo.

Re: No, really... stop believing
  • 9/4/2017 11:24:10 PM
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..

Jim writes

Understanding how people move around, where services are most needed, where crime is likely, how well mass transit and automobile flow are working, keeping water and energy systems working all can be tied to IoT. There's a ton of promise in the smart city concept, however, so far municipal use of IoT and analytics is limited to pilot or single-department projects. Sadly, the cost of doing things right presents a political challenge.

Austin was one of a handful of cities that competed as finalists for a big federal Smart Cities grant a couple of years ago. Austin lost, Columbus (Ohio) won.

I and a number of others here following this issue in Central Texas gained some insight and understanding about the program in its current form – mainly a small handful of disparate initiatives. Whether Smart Cities will ever be able to develop into the complex system Jim describes remains to be seen, especially with today's widespread nervousness about hacking, security, privacy, etc. 

..

Re: No, really... stop believing
  • 9/4/2017 1:22:49 PM
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Hi Michelle... I believe the IoT will thrive in industrial environments because it can leapfrog most the privacy concerns and contain the end-to-end security issues better. That will be fun to track!

Re: No, really... stop believing
  • 8/31/2017 10:28:17 PM
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louis, it's funny. I think the tech industry maybe doesn't even realize any more how much hype is an ingredient in their success. It's just so assumed. Just this morning, I listened to a digital expert talk about his ingredients for success, and a lot of it revolved around creating a connection with the consumer so that they feel you're on their side, you're looking out for them. That builds loyalty. But what was unsaid was that an ingredient is also that cool factor, that status symbol. If you give consumers that status symbol, that builds loyalty.

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