The Innovative Enterprise: Losing Sight of the Job?


James M. Connolly, Editor of All Analytics

Jim Connolly is a versatile and experienced technology journalist who has reported on IT trends for more than two decades. As editor of All Analytics he writes about the move to big data analytics and data-driven decision making. Over the years he has covered enterprise computing, the PC revolution, client/server, the evolution of the Internet, the rise of web-based business, and IT management. He has covered breaking industry news and has led teams focused on product reviews and technology trends. Throughout his tech journalism career, he has concentrated on serving the information needs of IT decision-makers in large organizations and has worked with those managers to help them learn from their peers and share their experiences in implementing leading-edge technologies through publications including Computerworld. Jim also has helped to launch a technology-focused startup, as one of the founding editors at TechTarget, and has served as editor of an established news organization focused on technology startups and the Boston-area venture capital sector at MassHighTech. A former crime reporter for the Boston Herald, he majored in journalism at Northeastern University.

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Re: It Depends
  • 9/23/2017 1:41:02 PM
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In his blog article, Jim writes

For many valuable employees, their use of data is reflected not in innovation on their own part, but in things like how the new trouble ticketing system makes their workday better, how best practices direct patient care, or a navigation system guides their truck around a traffic jam. It helps them do their jobs better.

Many workers just in their daily routine probably tend to introduce a lot of creativity into their jobs. You could say this is akin to innovation. 

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Re: It Depends
  • 9/23/2017 7:58:36 AM
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I agree, plenty of jobs will remain fluid, but I think everyone has to approach their career assuming they will go through at least a couple of major career shifts over the course of 30-40 years. I'm not talking about changing employers while doing the same job or just picking up a new development language, but completely different careers. So, maybe the web developer might want to pick up a real estate license, or at least keep an eye on the "emerging jobs" that tech creates. Now that I think of it, web developer and web anything were the emerging jobs just 20 years ago.

It Depends
  • 9/22/2017 11:03:52 PM
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Jim, I think its a tricky question it depends on the job and the industry. I think some careers will become highly fluid while others that are not as interpretative will remain the standard job. Time will tell

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