Yes, the IoT Does Matter to You


It's easy to sit back and look at any technology concept and take the curmudgeonly approach, saying, "It'll never work."

Consider Digital Equipment Corp.'s Ken Olsen in 1977: "There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home.

How about Ethernet inventor Bob Metcalfe in 1995, "I predict the Internet will soon go spectacularly supernova and in 1996 catastrophically collapse.

I'm sure that someone once said we will never need a phone, computer, music machine, camera, and navigation system that fits in our pocket. Hey, that might have been me.

Credit: Pixabay
Credit: Pixabay

When we talk about the Internet of Things, it's really easy to be a curmudgeon. Some of the IoT uses that people propose are pretty frivolous. I would be proud to be remembered as someone who said we don't need a high tech refrigerator that tells us when to buy milk.

However, we do need some intelligence in our home heating and energy management systems, and the ability to turn our lights on and off from a cell phone -- making home appear occupied when we are away -- isn't a bad idea.

Yet, the IoT in our personal lives is only a thin slice of the IoT concept. The real benefits are in the business world, where that smart refrigerator is a walk-in cooler in a restaurant, letting management know when it's time to reorder meats or which produce should be served first. The data that the home energy system sends back to your utility provides the business intelligence that the company needs to guide others in smart energy use and ties into the power grid. The IoT can route delivery trucks, smooth airline travel, and keep manufacturing lines moving.

That business angle to the IoT is what we will be discussing this week.

On Tuesday, November 29, at 2 pm Eastern time, Why the IoT Matters to Your Business will be the topic on All Analytics Radio, when our guest if Dima Tokar, co-founder and CTO of MachNation, joins us to provide a snapshot of how far we have progressed and where we still have to go with the IoT in business.

Companies are launching IoT initiatives where technology promises to address real business problems. Some of those companies have found success with IoT in a relatively short period of time. Others are still in the planning or exploration stage.

IoT holds promise in operational efficiency, identifying new business opportunities, and improved customer intelligence and support. It also is a technology concept that both serves and connects the enterprise and consumer markets.

Join us for this Internet of Things status report and learn what the IoT can and maybe cannot do for your organization.

Then, next week, on December 6, A2 Radio is on the air again, this time looking at the use of analytics in the retail sector. Brittany Bullard is is author of the new book Style & Statistics, which will be featured at January's National Retail Federation's Big Show in New York.

Bullard, who launched her career in the retail sector, is a Solutions and Analytical Consultant in the Retail and Consumer Packaged Goods Practice at SAS. Her book details how a retail strategy today has to be based on a combination of data analytics and real-world management experience. Have you ever wondered why a product with what seems to be "style" doesn't sell? Often it's because it's the wrong product for the wrong market or at the wrong time. Understanding products, buyers, pricing, timing and other factors calls for that mix of style (market knowledge) and statistics, including big data.

Take a moment and register for both shows now.

James M. Connolly, Editor of All Analytics

Jim Connolly is a versatile and experienced technology journalist who has reported on IT trends for more than two decades. As editor of All Analytics he writes about the move to big data analytics and data-driven decision making. Over the years he has covered enterprise computing, the PC revolution, client/server, the evolution of the Internet, the rise of web-based business, and IT management. He has covered breaking industry news and has led teams focused on product reviews and technology trends. Throughout his tech journalism career, he has concentrated on serving the information needs of IT decision-makers in large organizations and has worked with those managers to help them learn from their peers and share their experiences in implementing leading-edge technologies through publications including Computerworld. Jim also has helped to launch a technology-focused startup, as one of the founding editors at TechTarget, and has served as editor of an established news organization focused on technology startups and the Boston-area venture capital sector at MassHighTech. A former crime reporter for the Boston Herald, he majored in journalism at Northeastern University.

Big Data Success Essentials: Tech, People, and Process

While there is an increasing focus on the role of people alongside technology in analytics initiatives, let's not forget that process -- business rules -- play an important role in big data success.

Why You Should Remember Equifax

The Equifax breach raises multiple concerns about how companies respond to hacks, but also how they handle third-party consumer data.


Re: Let's call the IoT what it really is
  • 1/5/2017 4:22:36 PM
NO RATINGS

..

Broadway writes


It blows my mind that, after all the repeated talk about the risks of IOT that there is still this problem of the underdeveloped security aspect.


 

I was interested in what the outlook for IoT (particularly security considerations) was in 2017. A Google search found the following rather informative Forbes article from just a couple of days ago: Internet Of Things (IoT) Outlook For 2017

There's a lot of interesting issues to discuss here, but what especially caught my eye was the summary outlook for IoT security:


Security gets its due. We finally began to take security seriously in 2016, largely because we saw IoT hacks. The big denial-of-service attack in October, and the potential of a drone injecting a malicious virus via lights (from outside a building), caused great concern throughout the industry. We saw some solid announcements, such as the Industrial Internet Consortium releasing its security framework. With all the new vulnerable devices now being put into service, 2017 will see hackers continue to exploit IoT systems. Expect large scale breaches, as hackers look for newly connected devices in the energy and transportation areas.


 

The section starts out sounding comforting ... until you get to the last two sentences:


With all the new vulnerable devices now being put into service, 2017 will see hackers continue to exploit IoT systems. Expect large scale breaches, as hackers look for newly connected devices in the energy and transportation areas.


 

Gulp.

 

Re: Let's call the IoT what it really is
  • 1/3/2017 8:30:05 PM
NO RATINGS

The grand vision of IoT has always had "pie-in-the-sky" dreams of it intersecting across every avenue of consumer and enterprise life.  IBM's collateral going back to 2010 or so indicates as much, for instance.

Now that we're getting closer to reaching that reality, however, only now are the data-privacy, cybersecurity, and other downsides becoming more readily apparent of that IoT vision.

Re: Let's call the IoT what it really is
  • 1/3/2017 4:37:34 AM
NO RATINGS

..

T Sweeney writes


Pretty safe to predict that in 2017 marketers will start to back away from how great and connected the IoT is. If they're smart, they'll focus on locking down its numerous vulnerabilities.


 

IoT made sense to me on a small scale, mainly industrial or commerical. I was impressed by that Amtrak maintenance manager's ability to access data on his smartphone about all the locomotives in the Amtrak system (running or stationary) at any point in time.

It seems to me all the developers and vendors associated with IoT were both starry-eyed (unrealistic) and greedy with respect to the expansion of the system to just about everything. The implications in terms of sensors alone seemed staggering to me.

The security issues clearly have been grossly underestimated and ignored, and I would second the call for a focus on locking down vulnerabilities.

..

Re: Let's call the IoT what it really is
  • 1/1/2017 1:36:41 AM
NO RATINGS

@T Sweeney: Indeed, it's hard enough for IT managers to keep up to date on their patching and patching needs in a "regular" environment -- let alone one where IoT is thrown into the mix!

At an IoT security conference I attended earlier this year, a number of vendors presented themselves as concerning themselves and their customers with this very issue -- helping customers to manage patches, certificates, and the like for their IoT-enabled networks.  The demand appears to be there, too.

Re: Let's call the IoT what it really is
  • 1/1/2017 1:35:05 AM
NO RATINGS

@Broadway: The funny thing is, even though the Dyn DDoS attack T Sweeney references happened only this year, IoT botnets taking down the Internet already had a proof of concept more than three years ago.

And people ignored the signs then, too.

Re: Let's call the IoT what it really is
  • 1/1/2017 1:34:04 AM
NO RATINGS

@T: I think that reputation will come back.  We still have all kinds of cloud computing buzz, after all -- despite all of the cloud hacks we've faced.

And people still shop at Target and Home Depot. ;)

Re: Let's call the IoT what it really is
  • 1/1/2017 1:33:08 AM
NO RATINGS

@Terry: I haven't watched it, but this sounds a lot like "Who's the cylon?" drama from Battlestar Galactica.

Re: Let's call the IoT what it really is
  • 12/31/2016 5:40:58 PM
NO RATINGS

It blows my mind that, after all the repeated talk about the risks of IOT that there is still this problem of the underdeveloped security aspect. What gives?

Re: Let's call the IoT what it really is
  • 12/31/2016 3:04:45 PM
NO RATINGS

Ha! What makes you think you haven't already been chipped, Joe?

Guess I've been watching too much Mr. Robot.

Re: Let's call the IoT what it really is
  • 12/31/2016 3:01:44 PM
NO RATINGS

Agreed, @Zimana... but a big chunk of managing technology is updating and patching and closing off software vulnerabilities, and so far, IoT has done a terrible job of managing the security side of things.

That doesn't make it unique in the cosmology of technologies that enterprises use, but its highly distributed nature creates wide-scale vulnerability that should give everyone pause.

Page 1 / 6   >   >>
INFORMATION RESOURCES
ANALYTICS IN ACTION
CARTERTOONS
VIEW ALL +
QUICK POLL
VIEW ALL +