3 Data Governance Challenges Today's Companies Face


(Image: maxsattana/iStockphoto)

(Image: maxsattana/iStockphoto)

Some organizations have mastered data governance, but they are in the minority. As data volumes continue to grow, most businesses are finding it hard to keep up. 

"You're going to do this one way or another," said Shannon Fuller, director of data governance at  Carolinas Healthcare System. "You can do it in a controlled, methodical manner or you can do it when your hair's on fire."

Poor data governance can result in lawsuits, regulatory fines, security breaches and other data-related risks that can be expensive and damaging to a company's reputation. "We don't have regulation about data lineage and reporting and all that, but it's going to come," said Fuller. "Do you want to prepare for that now or do you want to be like Bank of America and spend billions of dollars complying with the law?  Most healthcare organizations don't have that kind of cash lying around."

[Read the rest of this story at InformationWeek]

Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer

Lisa Morgan is a freelance writer who covers big data and BI for InformationWeek. She has contributed articles, reports, and other types of content to various publications and sites ranging from SD Times to the Economist Intelligent Unit. Frequent areas of coverage include big data, mobility, enterprise software, the cloud, software development, and emerging cultural issues affecting the C-suite.

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Re: Hair is on fire
  • 3/31/2017 11:18:34 PM
NO RATINGS

@Louis - When the contract is negotiated everyone has the general expectation that the incoming CEO with make everything much better. Worst case is thought to be holding even.

If the BOD had any concerns about record-setting data breeches, they would have prevented this problem.

Re: Hair is on fire
  • 3/31/2017 6:43:23 PM
NO RATINGS

@Joe  And as far as the potential liabilities are concerned, when was the last time a CEO went to jail ?

Re: Hair is on fire
  • 3/31/2017 6:41:40 PM
NO RATINGS

"....but few could handle the pressure, demands, or responsibilities -- or would want to."

@Joe    I will take the pressure,demands, responsibilities and the money of course.  I think these factors are overrated, aren't those chosen for the position supposed to be best suited for it ?

Re: Hair is on fire
  • 3/31/2017 6:35:59 PM
NO RATINGS

@Joe   I suspect you are right but I am going to enjoy it while it last.

Re: Hair is on fire
  • 3/31/2017 6:33:59 PM
NO RATINGS

"....More power to them and shame on us. "

@rbaz  I hear you and I am taking notes.   I find it hard to believe that board members would not include a clause which states that if you leave the company in worse shape than it was before you took the helm, then you recieve nothing.   It seems to be the kind of thng one would expect from those who hold a fudiciary duty to a going concern.

The fact that this was not a consideration before employment exposes a breech IMO.  It is this kind of rationale which makes something like the adoption of analytics so difficult to achieve - not to mention security.

So in the end what is more important ?  The safeguarding of your customers data or the stock price ?   Well I think the answer is clear.   The truth is Yahoo never respected their customers/users from the boardroom on down and what do we and they have to show for it ?  

The largest security debacle in U.S. history.  A sale and a golden parachute.  An excuse - the Russians.   Bascially Busness as usual.

Re: Hair is on fire
  • 3/31/2017 5:16:53 PM
NO RATINGS

True there is an amount of life that is sacrificed, but they are willing to give up that up for the compensation. It's a tradeoff, the golden parachutes, however, impact the shareholders as well so it's an everybody pays scenario.

Re: Hair is on fire
  • 3/31/2017 3:35:38 PM
NO RATINGS

Indeed, for the potential liabilities that CEOs take on (corporate veil or no), such negotiating is par for the course.

It's very in vogue to complain about how much money Fortune [X] CEOs make in general (and, to be sure, some situations are true eyebrow raisers), but few could handle the pressure, demands, or responsibilities -- or would want to.

Re: Hair is on fire
  • 3/31/2017 3:32:49 PM
NO RATINGS

re: largest breach in history

The funny thing is, with the rate that we're breaking that record, I strongly suspect that the Yahoo breach won't be the biggest ever for long.  ;/

Re: Hair is on fire
  • 3/31/2017 1:40:18 PM
NO RATINGS

Rbaz you are right most people just get unemployment and maybe a small package regardless of their reason for dismissal. It becomes a game of avoiding a lawsuit for employers.

Re: Hair is on fire
  • 3/31/2017 1:26:53 PM
NO RATINGS

Louis, suits would or should I say would have paid more attention to security had they perceived it to be the threat that recent Revelations have shown. They are learning, and quickly I might add. The bottom line is that they presented a vision to the board and negotiated the best terms they could to protect and enriched themselves as much as possible. They will address anything that threaten the objective, sadly security was not perceived as a serious concern until a couple sacrificial lambs enlighten the herd. Most are lucky or shrud to have sheltered themselves from fallouts of their design. More power to them and shame on us.

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