Are You Really Ready for Intelligent Automation?


(Image: Shutterstock/zapp2photo)

(Image: Shutterstock/zapp2photo)

If you haven't considered how intelligent automation will impact your industry and company, start now. Automation is going to impact every industry and every business in some way, first as a competitive differentiator and later as a matter of economic necessity.

The average consumer has been interacting with bots online and on the phone for years. However, bots are now reviewing contracts faster than lawyers can and solving scientific problems that have taken scientists decades to solve.

Some vendors already claim that their software can replace salespeople or data scientists, although management and technology consultants tend view automation as "assistive" because humans and machines excel at different things. The manufacturing industry has proven that machines are better at rote, repetitive tasks than humans because they can do the same thing a bazillion times without getting tired or bored, or needing a break. However, machines are also better at pattern recognition than humans, which describes one of the core things researchers, consultants and even journalists do.

Perhaps intelligent automation would be easier to understand if its growth path were linear, meaning that it would replace tasks that don't require a lot of intelligence or skill first, and then move up over time to tasks that require increasing levels of skill and knowledge.

That isn't the way things are shaping up, however.

"Outsourcing and offshore manufacturing affected certain categories of jobs and there was job creation in other areas and that played out over a decade," said Todd Lohr, a principal within KPMG's Technology Enabled Transformation practice. "The problem here is this is going to happen faster than other transformation. It's non-linear, and it's going to affect all job categories."

[Read the rest of the story at InformationWeek.com]

Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer

Lisa Morgan is a freelance writer who covers big data and BI for InformationWeek. She has contributed articles, reports, and other types of content to various publications and sites ranging from SD Times to the Economist Intelligent Unit. Frequent areas of coverage include big data, mobility, enterprise software, the cloud, software development, and emerging cultural issues affecting the C-suite.

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Re: Surprise! Surprise!
  • 9/30/2017 7:19:33 PM
NO RATINGS

@Lyndon - An AI-based Godhead is a unique application. Let's talk again when the patented Godhead has his first million or two million followers.

Wait - how was he able to patent this idea - didn't Wizard of Oz already do this?

Re: Surprise! Surprise!
  • 9/30/2017 4:04:07 PM
NO RATINGS

..

Kq4 writes that "We will all probably be well surprised at what applications intelligent automation may [predominate] in coming years."

Here's an application I find especially fascinating:

Deus ex machina: former Google engineer is developing an AI god

As the Guardian article explains:

Anthony Levandowski, who is at the center of a legal battle between Uber and Google's Waymo, has established a nonprofit religious corporation called Way of the Future, according to state filings first uncovered by Wired's Backchannel. Way of the Future's startling mission: "To develop and promote the realization of a Godhead based on artificial intelligence and through understanding and worship of the Godhead contribute to the betterment of society."

Presumably believers can be connected to God through the IoT.

..

Re: Surprise! Surprise!
  • 9/30/2017 3:48:19 PM
NO RATINGS

Technical support for home devices should be super simple, but it can be time consuming. I look forward to a time when user interfaces are better for all.

Re: Surprise! Surprise!
  • 9/30/2017 3:42:00 PM
NO RATINGS

Working in technical fields, we tend to spend lots of time on the technical interfaces. The wi-fi connections or other machine-to- machine interfaces.

However, like you, when we are consumers, it's the human interface that is paramount for most of us.

Re: Surprise! Surprise!
  • 9/30/2017 1:05:44 PM
NO RATINGS

The cost and the trouble of setting up the devices separate from everything else on the network. I already take advantage of my router's other advanced features...

Re: Surprise! Surprise!
  • 9/29/2017 4:23:35 PM
NO RATINGS

@Michelle - what's holding you back?

We bought a new router that is internet accessible. Let's me set a bedtime for internet use for each person on our WiFi. Plus I can dynamically block websites by category and limit internet time for our children. I'd recommend it.

Re: Surprise! Surprise!
  • 9/29/2017 1:46:34 PM
NO RATINGS

I'm not ready at all. I can't even bring myself to buy a Roomba or IoT doorbell.

Surprise! Surprise!
  • 9/10/2017 7:56:32 AM
NO RATINGS

We will all probably be well surprised at what applications intelligent automation may predominte in coming years. From factories, to "intellectual" type of tasks, the future is unlimied in the ways machines can help us work more efficiently, faster, and make our work days less stressful and tedious. I'm not sure I will look forward though to a day when my "boss" is a machine.

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