Why Your Business May Not Be Ready for AI


Artificial intelligence is on the minds of business leaders everywhere because they've either heard or believe that AI will change the way companies do business.

What we're seeing now is just the beginning. For everyone's sake, more thought needs to be given to the workforce impact and how humans and machines will complement each other.

Recently, professional services company Genpact and FORTUNE Knowledge Group surveyed 300 senior executives from companies in the North American, European and Asia-Pacific regions with annual revenues of $1 billion per year or more. According to the report, "AI leaders expect that the modern workforce will be comfortable working alongside robots by 2020."

However, getting there will require a different approach to organizational change.

(Image: Shutterstock)

(Image: Shutterstock)

"A bunch of people are thinking about AI as a technology. What they're not thinking about is AI as the enabler of new enterprise processes, AI as an augmenter of humans in enterprise processes," said Genpact Senior Vice President Gianni Giacomelli. "Right now, 70% of the effort is spent on technology, 20% on processes and 10% on humans as a process piece. I think that's the wrong way to look at it."

What is the right way to think about AI? At one end of the spectrum, people are touting all the positive things AI will enable, such as tackling some of our world's biggest social problems. On the other end of the spectrum are Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking and others who foresee a dark future that involves unprecedented job losses if not human extermination.

Regardless of one's personal view of the matter, business leaders need to be thinking harder and differently about the impact AI may have on their businesses and their workforces. Now.

[Read the rest of this story at InformationWeek.com]

Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer

Lisa Morgan is a freelance writer who covers big data and BI for InformationWeek. She has contributed articles, reports, and other types of content to various publications and sites ranging from SD Times to the Economist Intelligent Unit. Frequent areas of coverage include big data, mobility, enterprise software, the cloud, software development, and emerging cultural issues affecting the C-suite.

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Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/16/2017 6:21:11 PM
NO RATINGS

In re LisaMorgan's comment, "familiarity lowers adoption barriers..."

Yes, indeed. Look at the relative lack of resistance when Apple added Siri as the interface to Apple TV. Yes, they're getting us ready for Skynet. ;->

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/16/2017 6:18:43 PM
NO RATINGS

In re tomsg's query, "Does the device need to be [l]icensed to give therapy?"

They'll skirt that requirement by calling it something else.

"Shrink bot"

"Wellness app"

"Mood alterer"

I think I've just designed A2's next poll.

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/16/2017 6:15:56 PM
NO RATINGS

Ha! Yes, AI can truly be considered intelligent when it gets passive-aggressive with its rudeness.

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/16/2017 6:10:17 PM
NO RATINGS

@TSweeney, I think they think voice UIs will become common enough that people won't mind them regardless of the application.  That may not be true, but famiiarity lowers adoption barriers.

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/16/2017 6:08:29 PM
NO RATINGS

Sounds like this @TSweeney

Me:  Siri, [request]

Me:  Siri, [Request]

Me"  Siri, [REQUEST!]  @%$#!

Siri:  There's no need for profanity.

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/16/2017 6:04:47 PM
NO RATINGS

@SethBreedLove:  The term "robot" no  longer requires a physical aspect.  

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/16/2017 6:00:40 PM
NO RATINGS

@kq4ym, most people selling products or services dismiss what Musk, et al are saying.  The thing is we're running faster than our ability to understand the total effecct of our actions and the total effect is not completely foreseeable yet.

 

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/16/2017 4:33:45 PM
NO RATINGS

Tom, the same way that the robot will be programmed to your expectations, it will be looking for you to behave to expectations. If you venture outside of the set parameters, the intervention mode kicks in. It'll be well implemented. Don't worry!

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/16/2017 4:25:12 PM
NO RATINGS

Does the device need to be icensed to give therapy? I wonder how that process would work.

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/16/2017 3:56:51 PM
NO RATINGS

Tom, we're talking full AI here. It'll sense your mood and adjust, as well as provide therapy if it deems it necessary. HR of course will have a no dating policy in place with the most severe action taken for any sexual harassment that goes on.

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