Why Your Business May Not Be Ready for AI


Artificial intelligence is on the minds of business leaders everywhere because they've either heard or believe that AI will change the way companies do business.

What we're seeing now is just the beginning. For everyone's sake, more thought needs to be given to the workforce impact and how humans and machines will complement each other.

Recently, professional services company Genpact and FORTUNE Knowledge Group surveyed 300 senior executives from companies in the North American, European and Asia-Pacific regions with annual revenues of $1 billion per year or more. According to the report, "AI leaders expect that the modern workforce will be comfortable working alongside robots by 2020."

However, getting there will require a different approach to organizational change.

(Image: Shutterstock)

(Image: Shutterstock)

"A bunch of people are thinking about AI as a technology. What they're not thinking about is AI as the enabler of new enterprise processes, AI as an augmenter of humans in enterprise processes," said Genpact Senior Vice President Gianni Giacomelli. "Right now, 70% of the effort is spent on technology, 20% on processes and 10% on humans as a process piece. I think that's the wrong way to look at it."

What is the right way to think about AI? At one end of the spectrum, people are touting all the positive things AI will enable, such as tackling some of our world's biggest social problems. On the other end of the spectrum are Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking and others who foresee a dark future that involves unprecedented job losses if not human extermination.

Regardless of one's personal view of the matter, business leaders need to be thinking harder and differently about the impact AI may have on their businesses and their workforces. Now.

[Read the rest of this story at InformationWeek.com]

Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer

Lisa Morgan is a freelance writer who covers big data and BI for InformationWeek. She has contributed articles, reports, and other types of content to various publications and sites ranging from SD Times to the Economist Intelligent Unit. Frequent areas of coverage include big data, mobility, enterprise software, the cloud, software development, and emerging cultural issues affecting the C-suite.

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Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/31/2017 11:44:25 PM
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An AI vendor I spoke to recently reminded me that machines aren't sentient and that AI is just "really elegant math," in her words. All the elegance in the world isn't going to turn machines into thinking, feeling, reasoning cyborgs. 

Sarah Connor will just have to shred lines of code in that climactic final scene, which is slightly more visually interesting than watching T Cruise and Holly Hunter make xeroxes as the climax of The Firm.

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/31/2017 11:41:08 PM
NO RATINGS

AI experts warn against the highly curated bubbles where we are only shown what we might like/love. Navigating conflict and disappointment seems to be like sudoku for the psyche. I worry about us getting a little too comfortably numb inside our "If you like this, you'll love that" bubbles.

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/28/2017 12:07:04 PM
NO RATINGS

Louis, isn't fun putting on our future seeing glasses? I've wondered if we see what we would like things to be verses what we project how things will be. But it's highly dynamic as unforseen technology advancements emerge.

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/27/2017 7:33:59 PM
NO RATINGS

@rbaz    I like how you foresee the future robot might be.   I have no issues with it, I think that your vision is probably the best way to gain acceptance by humans. 

Well, on second thought, the only problem that I can see is that a person will pick a robot that makes things easy on them.  For example, if you order a robot not to debate, maybe debating is something you should be developed within your personality and this type of growth can easily become suppressed by "made to order" robots.

But really I am nit picking here, it is the best approach for gaining wide acceptance that I have heard thus far.

 

Thank you Sir.

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/26/2017 10:27:25 PM
NO RATINGS

Sweeney, are have read my mind. Or how about homeowners allowing Amazon to place listening devices in their place of residence? We are walking happily into a future where we are ceding our control to machines in the name of convenience and coolness. It ain't gonna be no Jetsons' future. Just ask Sarah Connor.

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/23/2017 1:06:47 PM
NO RATINGS

Pretty sure software makers of AI therapy apps will frontload their terms of service with all sorts of disclaimers and liability waivers, just like every other piece of software you ever clicked the "I agree" button for.

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/22/2017 11:42:14 AM
NO RATINGS

An interesting question that is, will government agencies start requiring professional licenses when using AI for therapy or work where the outcome may well be dangerous to human safely and health. And then I would suppose there will be mandatory testing of the AI derived programs to determine there is no adverse effects likely with their use?

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/16/2017 6:21:11 PM
NO RATINGS

In re LisaMorgan's comment, "familiarity lowers adoption barriers..."

Yes, indeed. Look at the relative lack of resistance when Apple added Siri as the interface to Apple TV. Yes, they're getting us ready for Skynet. ;->

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/16/2017 6:18:43 PM
NO RATINGS

In re tomsg's query, "Does the device need to be [l]icensed to give therapy?"

They'll skirt that requirement by calling it something else.

"Shrink bot"

"Wellness app"

"Mood alterer"

I think I've just designed A2's next poll.

Re: Musk's Doomsday
  • 10/16/2017 6:15:56 PM
NO RATINGS

Ha! Yes, AI can truly be considered intelligent when it gets passive-aggressive with its rudeness.

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