12 Artificial Intelligence Terms You Need to Know


(Image: Pixabay)

(Image: Pixabay)

Suddenly, artificial intelligence (AI) is everywhere. For decades, the dream of creating machines that can think and learn like humans seemed like it would be perpetually out of reach, but now artificial intelligence is embedded in the phones we carry everywhere, the websites we use every day and, in some cases, even in the appliances we use around our homes.

The market researchers at IDC have predicted that companies will spend $12.5 billion on cognitive and AI systems in 2017, 59.3% more than they spent last year. And by 2020, total AI revenues could top $46 billion.

In many cases, AI has crept into our lives and our work without us realizing it. A recent survey of 235 business executives conducted by the National Business Research Institute and sponsored by Narrative Science found that while only 38% of respondents thought they were using AI in their workplace, 88% of them were actually using AI-based technologies like predictive analytics, automated reporting and voice recognition and response.

This highlights one of the big issues with artificial intelligence: A lot of people don't really understand what AI is.

Adding more confusion to the mix, researchers and product developers who work in AI throw around a lot of technical terms that can be baffling to the uninitiated. If they don't work directly on AI systems, even veteran IT professionals sometimes have difficulty explaining the differences between machine learning and deep learning or defining what exactly a neural network is.

[Read the full story at InformationWeek.com]

Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Writer

Cynthia Harvey is a freelance writer and editor based in the Detroit area. She has been covering the technology industry for more than fifteen years.

12 Artificial Intelligence Terms You Need to Know

Is artificial intelligence the same thing as machine learning? And what is a neural network? We explain fundamental AI terminology in everyday terms.


Re: AI language
  • 10/23/2017 8:39:13 AM
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Their rudimentary nature is why I equate the current batch of AI bots to what we've seen done with IVR but I know that isn't the end goal.  I think what we have right now is a stop gap between what is being promised and what can actually be delivered.  When I can have a personal assistant bot that behaves in a way that I direct and is capable of negotiating and acting on my behalf the way that I would then I'll jump on board.

Re: AI language
  • 10/17/2017 5:12:32 PM
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SaneIT writes

If you look at the ways current AI bots have broken or reacted when released into the wild they are very much like a parrot in that they only repeat what they are taught to repeat.  In a more technological sense I related them more closely to the old telephony systems that would drop you into an interactive voice response system and then would fax you a document based on your menu selections.  In most cases the bots are little more than press 1 for technical support...  They just aren't listening for tones they are waiting to see key words so that they can drop into the next level of the menu. 

These IVR systems are quite clever, very rudimentary implementations of extremely rudimentary AI, but they have a (long(1) ... (long(n)) way to go before they can begin to effectively parse the subtleties of human language. Make that each human language. And that's parsing, not really understanding.

Currently they mainly seem to work with initial enabling commands, like "Alexa, what time is it?" So we humans have to know what those enabling commands or words are. But that's OK, if it could make my phone, recorder, or whatever do something I need while my hands are otherwise occupied (such as driving a car, eating a cheeseburger, or riding my bike).

 

Re: AI language
  • 10/16/2017 8:31:21 AM
NO RATINGS

If you look at the ways current AI bots have broken or reacted when released into the wild they are very much like a parrot in that they only repeat what they are taught to repeat.  In a more technological sense I related them more closely to the old telephony systems that would drop you into an interactive voice response system and then would fax you a document based on your menu selections.  In most cases the bots are little more than press 1 for technical support...  They just aren't listening for tones they are waiting to see key words so that they can drop into the next level of the menu. 

Re: AI language
  • 10/15/2017 12:01:03 PM
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SaneIT writes

 Right now AIs are good at looking for key words and running predetermined routines when they see those keywords but from what I see there is little or no contextual understanding.  Some of that is faked by using a phrase instead of a single word but it is still a rudimentary application.  The bots used to read legal briefs are still looking for keywords and forming relationships to other documents using those words and phrases.  

Interesting observation. This would seem to put current AI more on the level of a sophisticated parrot than that of a truly thinking, understanding, sentient being. Except that maybe parrots are more creative in their own way.

 

Re: AI language
  • 10/9/2017 8:06:26 AM
NO RATINGS

The taking action part really is a leap.  Right now AIs are good at looking for key words and running predetermined routines when they see those keywords but from what I see there is little or no contextual understanding.  Some of that is faked by using a phrase instead of a single word but it is still a rudimentary application.  The bots used to read legal briefs are still looking for keywords and forming relationships to other documents using those words and phrases.   Creativity is going to be a big leap and that's what I see as necessary to begin taking action.  The AI is going to have to decide how to use what it has just learned and where to apply it.   That's more than just understanding words and context. 

Re: AI language
  • 10/7/2017 8:36:42 PM
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@tomsg I'm inclined to agree with you. 

Re: AI language
  • 10/6/2017 9:25:03 AM
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..

SaneIT writes

I wonder what they are teaching the AI to read.  If it is a published novel/article/research paper the results may be drastically different than trying to teach it to read text messages from customers.

I think Gates was talkig about teachine AI to read books and magazine articles and such ... but also to understand what the system is reading.

This got me wondering ... AI now is able to read news feeds and generate news articles. It's able to review legal issues and generate legal briefs and similar documents. Apparently what it's able to do is to follow some reote-based algorithmic pattern and generate assembly-line-style textual products without actually understanding any of it.

My inference of what Gates was saying is that AI needs to learn to actually understand written material and generate creatively based results, such as writing reviews or critiques, taking action, etc. That sounds like quite a leap, especially the "taking action" part ...

..

Re: AI language
  • 10/6/2017 8:45:10 AM
NO RATINGS

You will only fight if you are a human. Robots won't care.

Re: AI language
  • 10/6/2017 8:35:59 AM
NO RATINGS

Maybe our downfall will be an AI cat, this is probably why Boston Dynamics built their first robots in dog form.  They know that they'll have to fight the AI cats to preserve the human race.

 

Re: AI language
  • 10/6/2017 8:29:52 AM
NO RATINGS

I wonder what they are teaching the AI to read.  If it is a published novel/article/research paper the results may be drastically different than trying to teach it to read text messages from customers.  I could see bots struggling when trying to decipher messages with poor spelling, weird abbreviations and acronyms as well as the typical grammar I see in SMS formats.  It's almost like another language some times. 

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