What's Your Data Privacy Mindset?

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Re: Data Privacy?
  • 11/26/2016 10:44:18 AM
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Lyndon, hasn't the change already taken place? I think there are certain people who have no filter and spew their private everything everywhere. But I think there are the majority who now carefully guard their real persona online as a company would. It's all about branding.

Re: Data Privacy?
  • 11/26/2016 5:45:12 AM
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> Wonder what a group of data analysts know that most people don't?

Reminds me of that website (that I can't remember the name of anymore) that was in the news recently, where you go and it narrates for you (in both text and via a voice over your speakers) everything that you are doing -- and what a web advertiser might be thinking about it.

Compliance
  • 11/26/2016 5:43:18 AM
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For me, what immediately comes to mind are compliance concerns -- particularly cross-continental ones, and the juxtaposition of the overly privacy-sensitive EU and the far too free-wheeling US.

Re: Data Privacy?
  • 11/21/2016 11:17:49 PM
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..

I chose the third option: "I'll play it as safe as possible". Amazingly, I find myself not an outlier but among the 55% majority (so far) that agree with this option.

The loss of privacy – data, personal, and every other kind – is gonna have seismic implications, not just in terms of a Big Brother-style surveillance society and the loss of important civil liberties, but in ordinary routine social interaction and behavior. If individuals no longer can rely on their personal data and actions and thoughts and opinions and other activities and possessions being private in any way, I foresee that this will dramatically change how people act in every way.

..

Re: Data Privacy?
  • 11/18/2016 1:45:29 PM
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@PC,  I think iwith so many people transmitting information via social media, for the young people, the concept of privacy accidently bundles in personal and professionally privacy. You can share photos of your personal life on social media and then carry that same cavalier attitude into the work place.  However, if your work environment requires that you guard the confidentiality of your work products, then as an older analytics professional, you would have a different view. 

So I commend you for your very astute observation. I attribute this behavioral dichotomy to the fact that professional analysts are trained and constantly reminded to separate what you do socially from what you do professionally. Those annual security awareness programs help to keep out of hot water.

Re: Data Privacy?
  • 11/18/2016 12:24:22 AM
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The first choice -

I'll gladly give up privacy to get something for free is way more popular with the general public than it is here.

Wonder what a group of data analysts know that most people don't?

Re: Data Privacy?
  • 11/5/2016 4:46:14 PM
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Curious! I suspect privacy doesn't mean what we think it means...anymore. Looking forward to your next post.

Data Privacy?
  • 11/4/2016 9:12:33 AM
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Without leaking a future blog on this topic, I would suggest to the A2 community that we have to reimagine what is meant by 'data privacy'. More to come on this down the road. But for now, please know that I have strong reasons for selecting 'Other' in the survey.

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