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Re: Qual vs Quan
  • 7/31/2013 10:57:23 PM
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I think gathering quantitative data data is very board, it can be based on a small amount of data collected or it can be based on so much data it is very hard to process them all and it depands on the source of the data gathered as well.

Re: Qual vs Quan
  • 7/24/2013 10:35:23 AM
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In the few focus group studies I've done I found it wasn't that effective in some situations. Although I think it's more to do with the background of the participants. When we did focus groups for aid beneficiaries etc. most were scared to talk or air their opinion. One or two people would generally speak up and the rest will just agree with them. But it was not the case when the participants were from a different background. Eg: customers, employees.

Re: Qual vs Quan
  • 7/24/2013 9:07:47 AM
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Thanks Tom Anything else that's important to know?

Re: Always and forever?
  • 7/24/2013 9:01:19 AM
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HI Tom. I think that's a reasonable answer! One of the benefits of data visualization is the ability to more easily understand what questions the analysts and/or business managers need to be asking... which, as you say, could very well lead to the desire for supplemental qualitative data. 

Re: Always and forever?
  • 7/24/2013 8:11:57 AM
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Beth - From my exposure to data visualization (which I will admit to being very finite), I find it a great tool in helping identify attributes within the data (trends, groupings, etc...), but for me it often elicites as many questions as it does answers (perhaps because those attibutes are so much easier to see).  And those questions often lead me back to wanting some qualitative data around the quantitaitive to better understand those attributes.

Re: Qual vs Quan
  • 7/24/2013 8:03:40 AM
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In the projects I've been involved with, we've used a variety of methods to gather qualitative data (depending on the sample size we required).  In some cases we've utilized focus groups, which can often give you the most candid qualitiative information, but also can be prone to wildly unproductive tangents or individual agendas from te participants.  For a larger sample size, in a retail enviornment specifically, we used customer surveys with the link posted at the bottom of a reciept.  But, in the first study that I mention here (the SaaS client's customer segmentation study), we only needed to interview a handful of customers to determine that one segment focused on B-to-B sales while the other focused on residential sales.

Re: Qual vs Quan
  • 7/24/2013 7:54:19 AM
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In the two cases I cited our sample size was huge.  For the both the empowerment category study and the  consumer segmentation studywe were able to aggregate all the trackable consumers (i.e. consumers who used a unique credit/debit card or a branded consumer credit card) from all the POS data for a time period to arrive at our insights.  In the case of the study for the start-up, we only needed to talk with a few customer to learn that different segments of the market were serving different client bases.

In these cases, our methods and objectives helped define the sample size required.

Re: Qual vs Quan
  • 7/24/2013 7:52:30 AM
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Good question Phoenix...let me second it.

Always and forever?
  • 7/23/2013 10:01:51 PM
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Hi Tom, I can't help but to think about data visualization in this context. Do you think that as our ability to present quantitative analysis in a more visual format that the need for qualitative analytics diminishes -- ie, we're getting more insight of the numbers than ever before possible?

Re: Qual vs Quan
  • 7/23/2013 8:10:50 PM
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I have always found it difficult to gather qualitative data. How was this process done?

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