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Social Analytics: Humans Not Obsolete Yet
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Re: Zombie social media life
  • 10/31/2013 12:06:18 PM
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Broadway LOL! I don't know that it's altogether possible to scrub everything
because there are so many restrictions based on individual websites and
ownership becomes an issue if someone is deceased. Eventually our legal system
will regulate our online demise but for now we are all eternal in some sense.
Additionally many of the data append brokers use public record sources so
getting all your information off the web maybe completely impossible

Re: Zombie social media life
  • 10/30/2013 9:35:25 PM
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@Maryam, isn't there a service you can pay for that will completely scrub your identity from the web? I recently heard a funny story from an acquiantance --- she is a woman probably in her late 40s, early 50s, but doesn't look it; she's single and was interested in a younger man, so she erased anything online that would reveal her age as she was courting him.

Re: Jaw-dropping results
  • 10/30/2013 8:58:51 PM
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"And since jury members are sequestered, the chances of them getting into trouble is pretty minute. "

Analytics will mostly be useful during the juror selection process.

Zombie social media life
  • 10/30/2013 2:00:44 PM
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I think it's very interesting that they could find social media data from deleted accounts it's should make everyone young and mature consider their social media posts more carefully. Your social media life never dies! :)

Re: Jaw-dropping results
  • 10/28/2013 11:46:20 PM
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That's not a bad idea, SaneIT! The CIA's data monitors often complain about how hard it is to differentiate 'signal' from 'noise' in the big data stream (wah wah), but if people actively engaged in social media smokescreening, they could definitely make life harder for services like these. Almost like counter-espionage. And i'm sure someone will offer it as a service if they don't already.

Another Way To Run Up Lawyer Bills
  • 10/28/2013 8:47:44 AM
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I'm thinking the use of analytics to find jurors is just another example of allowing lawyers carte blanche to run up the hourly billings. And you can be sure, running through social media postings is going to add up to some boatloads of time and money.

The real question is how valid are the predictions made based on the analytic decisions made? Unless there can be shown some real world benefits, we probably don't need to complicate the legal system anymore than it alreay is.

And if legal analytics does provide some exactness, won't it eventually be a zero sum world when all lawyers use the same data and get the same choices?

Re: Jaw-dropping results
  • 10/28/2013 8:28:59 AM
NO RATINGS

That's a good start to a list of ways our personal data is being used to vett us but I'm waiting for the change of tides when people start locking everything down or going offline again to prevent data from being collected.  We've already seen what can happen when social media drives a product and it fails in a few instances.  What will happen when people become intentionally disruptive online and make so much garbage data that it's hard to sort through the mess?

Re: Jaw-dropping results
  • 10/28/2013 1:58:09 AM
NO RATINGS

Once a juror has been selected, only a only a judge could have someone removed and it has to be for a very good reason.  For example, being drunk while listening to testimony.   And since jury members are sequestered, the chances of them getting into trouble is pretty minute. 

So using any type of analytics, is very important to a lawyer to get the juror they want. 

Re: Jaw-dropping results
  • 10/28/2013 1:24:00 AM
NO RATINGS

Great points, Seth - two follow-up questions:

1. What do you do if you find something out there that you want removed?

2. It sounds like a very likely scenario, given the Nate Silver-esque election prediction hype. Jury voting can't be very different -- you just have a relatively smaller number of variables.

Re: Jaw-dropping results
  • 10/28/2013 1:21:48 AM
NO RATINGS

Michael, having a tool to verify the sentiments being expressed during voir dire would be of great value to the attorneys. I do agree that jury selection is far from security clearance but the processes are beginning to bear similarities.

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