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Pushing the Edge at the Retail Shelf
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Pushing the Edge
  • 1/22/2014 10:42:37 PM
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I've seen these type of digital price displays and at Khols they recently added computer stations around the store. This gives anyone the opportunity to purchase any product, in stock or not, and have it shipped to your door. This brings the store to the future because if you find what you like but they are out of stock of a color or size you want, you can simply place an order and have it at your door in days.

Re: Where oh where?
  • 1/15/2014 8:12:13 PM
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Excellent point. Another issue: what if I put something in my cart because it states $5 on the shelf tag - but by the time I check out the tag is up to $6. How can I even argue the point?

Re: Where oh where?
  • 1/15/2014 1:11:24 PM
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I would think stores would have to be very careful about increasing prices for certain customers they identify as willing to pay it. But, reducing prices as a sales increaser would certainly work for me. How about displays including a limited time for the reduced price? "Buy me in the next five minutes and get $10 off!"

Re: Where oh where?
  • 1/15/2014 9:56:24 AM
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If analytics showed I would pay more, then the price could be adjusted upward as I approached the shelf.

 

Re: Where oh where?
  • 1/15/2014 7:56:39 AM
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Ah, I'd just mentioned Ariella's comment to you in a previous posting -- but I see you've seen that already! I've rarely used price scanners -- they always seem to pop out at me when I don't need them but squirrel away when I do need them! But, right, they wouldn't be of much use showing specialized shopper offers. The RF/RFID is an interesting one -- one that loads up CPG and retailers with tons of sensor data for the analyzing, theoretically at least. 

Re: Where oh where?
  • 1/14/2014 11:54:14 PM
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Why would the price increase, tomsg? The truth is, Andrew Dark did describe a scenario where dwindling supply and increasing demand could enable a store to raise prices, but there'd have to be a run on that product, and the consumer would probably not mind paying a bit extra.

He also described the concept of 'showrooming' -- where shoppers go to a physical retail store to look at or try an item, then find a better price online and order it. ESLs can enable a store to maintain competitive prices while still charing a bit more than the online retailers in exchange for instant gratification and personal service.

What other 'bad uses' do you envision?

 

Re: Where oh where?
  • 1/14/2014 11:49:36 PM
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I'll admit that I've never seen one in action, either, Beth, but I agree with Ariella that they're only as good as their alignment with the appropriate products, and that price scanners are a good backup.

However, a price scanner won't necessarily have the same pricing info as a shelf-edge label, if it's pushing a special offer to you, specifically.

Also, Intel was talking about affixing RF tags to every product in a store. Maybe this sort of solution could align with RFID to make sure the labels sync with the products *and* with the customers.

Re: Where oh where?
  • 1/14/2014 10:40:14 PM
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I haven't seen them either. I would get very disturbed if I approached one and saw the price increase because I was a frequent buyer! I can imagine a lot of bad uses for these.

Re: Where oh where?
  • 1/14/2014 5:16:33 PM
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I've never see one either Beth...guess I better scurry on over to my neighborhood Kohl's and see!

Re: Where oh where?
  • 1/14/2014 3:01:49 PM
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Ah! There is a Kohl's nearby that I don't get to very often. I'll have to stop by and see if they use them!

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