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Building Retail Trust as Data Evolves
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Building Retail Trust as Data Evolves
  • 1/24/2014 10:24:01 AM
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Retailers do a pretty good job getting their customers trust until something breaks that trust. This year I heard that Target was hacked and customers credit card information may have been taken. Security breaches happen daily and I myself have had to change my credit cards twice due to this matter. While I am not scared with my name and address getting out there, I am concerned when it could affect my finances. 
 

Re: IT & the CMO
  • 1/22/2014 10:53:32 AM
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I'd love to read the indepth analysis of what went wrong at Target when all is said and done -- because don't you think retailers were all on notice already, since the TJX breach? Like banks, they face a constant battle to keep ahead of the potential infiltrators. As you suggest, I'm sure they're all running even more scared now. Now... off to craft my tweet to Target. ;-)

 

Re: IT & the CMO
  • 1/22/2014 10:47:52 AM
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@BethSchultz That is interesting. I wonder what would happen if you tweeted to @Target if they would respond to you about this. I am sure they are flooded with remarks. Their initial reaction must have been to "act like there is no crisis" so they don't alarm customers. Who knows? They should have sent out letters to their customers for sure. Maybe this breach will make all retailers tighten up security in general? They must be scrambling for solutions as we speak.

Re: IT & the CMO
  • 1/22/2014 10:31:06 AM
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So @big data mama, I had to check my Spam folder to see if indeed Target sent me an apology that I just hadn't seen. Nope! Not a one (but had it, I certainly would have been among the highly suspicious!). So, even if I don't have an email address associated with my account, it knows my mailing address. So why no mailed letter of apology, either? I'll fume over this but still I have to say Target will remain my big-box retailer of choice. I guess we can chalk this up to be a case of the in-store shopping experience being of greater importance to me than the chance that the retailer's credit card database will once again be breached. (Of course, if I do eventually see personal ramification of the breach, I'll be feeling quite differently). 

Re: IT & the CMO
  • 1/22/2014 9:58:34 AM
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@Louis Watson It took my bank until the beginning of January to send a letter to me though. I was monitoring the activity online and they confirmed nothing suspicious occured. But, that might be because I did not use my PIN number. I never do that with those machines now. The only benefit to using a credit card there is that it makes returns easier if you lose your receipt. Otherwise, I agree that using cash in general is the smart way to go (especially for people who use debit cards anyway). 

It's interesting that Neiman Marcus got hit with the same scam. I would think they would have had tighter security measures in place to monitor fraudulent activity like this. I am curious how they are investigating all this because it has to have been caught on video somewhow one would think! Or it could have been an inside job. 

Re: IT & the CMO
  • 1/22/2014 9:50:35 AM
NO RATINGS

@BethShultz The report I heard said that Target issued an e-mail apologizing for the breach and that they were doing everthing they could to remedy the situation. (Perhaps the e-mail landed in your Spam box? They said that could happen. Most people who got the e-mail thought it was a scam in and of itself. And, they should be suspicious for right reasons. Target issued a statement saying that they NEVER solicit personal information in an e-mail, so customers can be confident that the e-mail was legitimate. Is your e-mail address linked to the Target card? Interestingly, the hackers were able to get other personally identifying information beyond the PIN number (which was something I didn't know at first). So, maybe they did get your information even if it wasn't linked to a PIN.) 

I had the same recoil as other customers. I didn't go to Target for a few weeks. 

 

Re: IT & the CMO
  • 1/21/2014 9:54:37 PM
NO RATINGS

@Maryam, @Beth   I too am surprised and disappointed in Target's response to this.   It took them four days to even make a public statement.  It seems to me that Target did not think they would ever be the target of data crime. 

Rumor has it that other major chains were compromised as well - I get the feeling that Target got the notoriety because of the sheer number of customers compromised.

Corporate apathy at it's best.   But on the bright side, improved security should come out of this and Target might even foot most of the bill.  I think it would be in their best interest to make it widely known that they are financially backing research and improvement in this area.

I honestly don't think I will ever trust Target again with a card, yet since you nearly must go there to get the many items needed.  I will have to carry cash, just a pain that I will have to go to these lengths.    

But in the end I am not sure Target from the board room to the CEO really appreciate their customers.

Re: IT & the CMO
  • 1/21/2014 5:19:16 PM
NO RATINGS

@Maryam, I scarcely stayed away from Target... but certainly didn't go out of my way to shop there, either. The thing is, I feel, this could happen at any retailer of any significant size that I might shop at. The best thing to do is use cash but that can be difficult if you're buying more than a few items, unless you know exactly how much to bring along with you. I'm just not that disciplined. We talked a bit about this during today's radio show on personalized big data, and the thing is, even with such a large-scale breach, the individual impact is minimal enough not to cause a backlash necessitating industry change. As our guest, Hyoun Park, noted, nobody died. 

Re: IT & the CMO
  • 1/21/2014 3:30:23 PM
NO RATINGS

Beth I know you shopped at Target as regularly as I did. I also did not get any communication from Target until recently. I did not receive a follow up regarding the identity monitoring they promised in the email communication and continue to hear in the media their systems are still not as secure as we would like to believe. The ripple effect; I haven't used my red card and did not enter a Target store for almost one month( a record for me). I am like many --disisappointed. I am beginning to think that the breaches will not stop until our payment methods become more secure. We need to look at how the data is stored and on both the cards and in files. Maybe some sort of advanced encryption on both ends.

Re: IT & the CMO
  • 1/21/2014 8:59:17 AM
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Well, yes, marketing analytics is a great use case, and often among the first for a company. But while I've heard there is some jockeying in companies to establish leadership for the customer-centric experience everybody seems to be striving for these days, I hadn't  yet heard of situations where IT reports to marketing. That seems odd to me, so I would love to hear more about it! 

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