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Hospitals Using Analytics to Maximize ROI
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Re: Traditional, and not so much?
  • 1/27/2014 11:22:49 PM
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I hope so, Phoenix. Separate from diagnostics, I think EMRs can help tremendously with predictive and preventive medicine. My doctor can tell me if I have "early warning signs" for certain conditions, but what if, based on my family history and current medical history, they can pinpoint these signs even earlier? It could change a patient's health trajectory entirely.

Re: Traditional, and not so much?
  • 1/24/2014 10:34:33 PM
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Thank you Michael for the information. It is great that they are implementing this system. It would help a lot when it comes to diagnosis.

Re: Traditional, and not so much?
  • 1/23/2014 5:41:48 PM
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The hope with EMRs is to create a standard-format "electronic chart" that travels with you wherever you go, healthcare-wise, Phoenix. This way you don't have to start from scratch with a medical history every time you visit a new provider.

As for predictive modeling, there's plenty of that happening on macro scales -- we looked at one example in this video.

Re: HIPAA
  • 1/23/2014 12:21:05 PM
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@Michael, another great point, that Uncle Sam cashflow never hurts on the project side. 

Re: Traditional, and not so much?
  • 1/23/2014 11:46:56 AM
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It will be good if data for the same patient can be shared among different health care providers. This way a good background understanding of a patient's history can be compiled. Using Hadoop might be a good option to have common data platforms. I wonder how far predictive modeling goes in healthcare.

Re: HIPAA
  • 1/23/2014 11:41:40 AM
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I agree -- and I think the infusion of cash from Uncle Sam and the general complexity of designing and integrating HIPAA-compliant systems that are also more open and interoperable has brought healthcare IT specialists to the fore. They're the ones with the reference architectures and tried-and-tested implementation strategies.

Re: HIPAA
  • 1/23/2014 11:34:04 AM
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@Michael, 

I think at that point if you are talking about a total forklift of a system and migrating over to something that has been designed to replace all aspects then end to end HIPAA testing would be much easier than it would have been to intergrate new pieces to the puzzes. Just my thoughts, but it would be great to have a few healthcare IT pros weigh in. 

Re: HIPAA
  • 1/23/2014 11:29:49 AM
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That's interesting, Bulk. I wonder whether we can get any healthcare folks to chime in. One of the points raised in the report is that many hospital IT systems are reaching the 5-year mark and will be replaced anyway, so this is a good opportunity for upgrades in functionality and meaningful use compliance. But of course, designing and testing for HIPAA at that point will create delays and challenges.

Thanks!

Re: HIPAA
  • 1/23/2014 1:55:12 AM
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@Michael, I would say I get the feeling my friends who work in healthcare tech have a solid understanding of it, but I get the impression that there are generally intergration and design issues when new elements are added to their systems. 

Re: HIPAA
  • 1/23/2014 1:04:39 AM
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It's ironic, because HIPAA and HITECH are all part of the same legislation package. But aren't the requirements for system design and security relatively well understood by now?

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