Comments
Shaky Ground for Connected Home Buildup
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 4   >   >>
Re: New vs old
  • 4/21/2014 9:23:55 AM
NO RATINGS

Funny thing -- I thought of this post, and more specifically my comments on it, over the weekend. I'd turned our heat on Saturday morning to take the chill out of the air, then left the house and didn't realize I hadn't flicked it off till I was too into my errands to return and do so. So I thought to myself, "Now here's an instance where remote control would come in handy!" But still, this would be just a one-off instance where I manually turned on the heat and I'm still thinking overall I can live with my automated system as-is. 

Re: Not my Internet of Things
  • 4/20/2014 1:31:42 PM
NO RATINGS

So that's the kind of utopia that could be realized if the fridge had a bar code scanner, a weight sensor or some other way to detect quantities, and a connection to the grocery store's customer management data. It's not crazy; it's just a matter of time.

For instance, and this is for Terry, if my daughter could, with one tap, alert me and the grocery store that we need more pickles, why would she waste time on the phone with me?

Re: New vs old
  • 4/20/2014 1:29:07 PM
NO RATINGS

I agree. And you can set the overnight/during work/home from work temps ahead of time on most non-smart thermostats nowadays, regardless. As some of the other posters mentioned, the real benefit here seems to be for home monitoring and security.

Re: Not my Internet of Things
  • 4/20/2014 1:27:49 PM
NO RATINGS

I agree with you 100%, Terry, but the general population doesn't necessarily have the kind of nuanced and well thought-out context to understand the implications of IoT. Hence the connected fridge. And yes, the idea that your fridge can text you when the milk's about to expire really does get some people excited.

Re: Standards Standards Standards
  • 4/15/2014 7:35:16 AM
NO RATINGS

@Ariella, exactly if you drive a car model that is frequently stolen and you have an anti-theft device it may be the difference between a thief taking your car or moving on to another car on your block.  Most thieves aren't looking for a challenge and won't take the chance of being caught just to prove that they can steal your car/data.

Re: Standards Standards Standards
  • 4/15/2014 7:32:36 AM
NO RATINGS

They asked me about the fridge in particular because it was a story that hit the main stream for a couple of days and they couldn't wrap their heads around how that could happen.  I still think lower tech espionage is more dangerous and likely to happen than a WiFi enabled fridge but it's good that people are paying attention to this.  

Re: Not my Internet of Things
  • 4/14/2014 6:59:08 PM
NO RATINGS

Every time I'm at the grocery store, I make a real-time voice call home. How much orange juice do we have?  Cayenne powder? Raisins? I don't care if it's an RFID solution, I just think there's room for improvement here.

On the other hand, I agree with Beth that remote control of my thermostat is underwhelming.

Re: Not my Internet of Things
  • 4/14/2014 6:15:30 PM
NO RATINGS

Right, PredictableChaos... these are always the kind of apps that show up. But do you need an Internet of Things to achieve it? How about Fridge-Cam™? Or RFID chips on all your food items ("1 slice of pimento loaf left!")? Or even a simple old-fashioned, real-time voice call to your daughter from the store for an update?

I know. Insane.

Re: Not my Internet of Things
  • 4/14/2014 6:06:28 PM
NO RATINGS

@Terry asks what my internet connected refrigerator can ever give me that I might actually need.  How about a real-time grocery list while I'm standing at the grocery store?

One that takes into account the groceries my daughter added to the fridge yesterday, and also the fact that the mustard is nearly out and our spinach is no longer edible.

Re: New vs old
  • 4/14/2014 3:04:27 PM
NO RATINGS

I attended a conference a while back and one of the keynoters, David Pogue, tech columnist now with Yahoo, said how great it was that he could control his home temperature remotely -- he said it it helps him keep the temperature in check when his kids are at home alone and thinking they could get away with blasting the A/C during the summer or cranking up the heat during the winter. And while I could see some benefit in that from occasionally having my own children override the automated time-of-day settings I've input, I would have to think that once the novelty of the capability wears off I'd never bother or remember. I'd want the smartphone app to be able to trigger an alert when a temperature max or mininum had been breached -- but even that wouldn't be all that great of an incentive to me. 

Page 1 / 4   >   >>


INFORMATION RESOURCES
ANALYTICS IN ACTION
CARTERTOONS
VIEW ALL +
QUICK POLL
VIEW ALL +