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Re: Call analytics
  • 4/30/2014 11:22:28 PM
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SaneIT writes


I agree that is is mostly the fault of the customer service managers and their attempt to make every transaction identical no matter how painful it is for everyone involved.  My take has always been that they should be given guidelines and limits then be allowed to handle calls in the manner necessary to complete the transaction even if it means transferring them to another rep because personalities clash.


 

It would be intersting to compere these contrasting approaches to customer service in some way. Maybe a role here for big data and analytics in such an evaluation?

 

 

 

Re: Call analytics
  • 4/28/2014 8:23:58 AM
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I agree that is is mostly the fault of the customer service managers and their attempt to make every transaction identical no matter how painful it is for everyone involved.  My take has always been that they should be given guidelines and limits then be allowed to handle calls in the manner necessary to complete the transaction even if it means transferring them to another rep because personalities clash.

Re: Call analytics
  • 4/26/2014 8:48:42 AM
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SaneIT writes


 The reps may as well have been recordings because no matter what the caller said they had to read a sales pitch word for word.  Even if the caller threatened to hang up and not buy they had to continue on and continue trying to "upsell" products.  Since we didn't need the additional income, it was just nice to have she stopped working for them because she felt like a robot just answering calls and taking abuse because someone was convinced that the hard sell approach was the best way to handle customers.


 

So often I think "customer service" phone personnel and such are just "human robots" — hubots. But maybe it's the Master Hubots (their managers and supervisors) that are turning them into robotic personalities. So perhaps the deployment of actual, analytics-based robots, with sensitivity analysis features, will be a true improvement.

 

Re: Data Graphics
  • 4/25/2014 11:54:36 AM
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Michael, a great question. While it is clear that data graphics tend to push an agenda, it is intentionally difficult to discern what they are hiding from you. Unless it's a binary situation, where say it is a data graphic about how many people have been saved because of the TSA, it obviously would not account for the oppressed or even delayed folks. The light is very much directed, but what's shadowed can be harder to see.

Re: Call analytics
  • 4/25/2014 9:49:01 AM
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That does sound singularly foolish, SaneIT -- especially when the numbers are so clear and even common sense would dictate that conversations follow the customer's lead. Maybe the managers needed to show a loss that quarter, and the reps were just collateral damage. You really never know with business. 

I will say that my customer service experiences have been hit-or-miss. Once in a while you get a genuinely engaged and helpful person. Other times, not. If this software can help improve those odds, I'm all for it.

Re: Call analytics
  • 4/25/2014 8:58:38 AM
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Judging by everything I saw this was based on nothing more than stubbornness. She kept a log of calls as a CYA effort, she tracked how many she manged to upsell, how many called and disconnected after the upsells started and they lost any sale at all and how many sat through the badgering and did not buy any of the upsale items.  The numer of upsell items sold didn't come within about $1500 per day of the sales lost when people wanted to skip all the upsell pitches but she wasn't allowed to and they hung up.  This is one person taking calls for 5-6 hours a day so maybe other reps were getting more upsells but this was consistant.  She started tracking this because the reps had to attend regular training calls and what the company harped on was the upsell and that the upsell scripts were mandatory.  Sure they could have forked the script but that wasn't an option for the reps.

Re: Call analytics
  • 4/24/2014 10:10:10 AM
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I agree with you on all counts, Lyndon, and this is another area where the state of the art is very far removed from reality on the ground. But it'll be interesting to see who rolls it out and what kinds of success they can measure.

Re: Call analytics
  • 4/24/2014 9:44:14 AM
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I can see that approach getting me very annoyed, very quickly, but I'd probably just hang up. Was that guidance based on data, though? And isn't it possible -- not necessarily likely, but possible -- that this kind of software can help marketers 'fork' the script if the caller is clearly agitated or in need of some other information?

Re: Data Graphics
  • 4/24/2014 9:29:20 AM
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So in a situation like this, CandidoNick, what do you think may be a data point that was 'quashed' or omitted or ignored in favor of the data that support the central premise?

Re: Call analytics
  • 4/23/2014 10:10:04 PM
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I'd think call monitoring would be extremely boring for humans with a fairly high "tune-out" rate and missing of critical information, so maybe this is one place where robotic voice-recognition and parsing analytics could do some good for the company. 

But this is sorta like leaping to another galaxy before so many companies have learned how to even fly. So often I find that the company's system has you repeat your ID info (e.g., phone number, name, whatever) several times; the "customer service" person fails to register the basic details you've slowly and patiently explained, and so on. Some basic interconnections and hiring of ordinarily attentive and intelligent personnel would help. Or maybe the robots can take over that too (as well as monitoring)...

But all that (and my rant) aside, this applications of analytics is impressive.

 

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