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Data Scientists: Who You Are & What You Earn
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Re: Male domination
  • 4/30/2014 11:19:42 AM
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Yes exactly since there is always more than one way to accomplish a task studying the most effective way and implementing it uniformly can save business tens of thousands a year.

Re: Male domination
  • 4/29/2014 3:29:50 PM
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Ah, so all about streamlining, increased productivity, process efficiency, or so it sounds.

Re: Male domination
  • 4/29/2014 3:29:50 PM
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Ah, so all about streamlining, increased productivity, process efficiency, or so it sounds.

Re: Male domination
  • 4/29/2014 1:45:21 PM
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Beth it was mostly used for manual jobs and jobs with repeated motions. It used time motion studies to determine the most efficient way to complete a task and it organized rooms materials etc. as needed. It then trained employees on the preferred process steps to increase efficiency and reduce waste. It was also used in call centers.

Re: Male domination
  • 4/23/2014 12:20:29 PM
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I don't recall the title of occupational engineering. What did that entail? 

Re: Male domination
  • 4/22/2014 9:46:08 PM
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Beth I think the title of data scientist is new but the skill set has existed for years. For many companies the title is variable do you remember when occupational engineering was a popular title? This individual's title is not data scientist but she could certainly meet many of the requirements including working with unstructured data.

Re: Male domination
  • 4/22/2014 4:36:56 PM
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One of the key differentiators, according to Burtch Works, is the ability to work with unstructured data. Would you agree? And, as for the "very bright individual" you mention -- is she a data scientist by title?

 

Re: Male domination
  • 4/22/2014 3:26:38 PM
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Beth I have run into people that would meet many of those criteria though I have not found one that could check all the boxes you listed. That would be quite the individual. They have worked on a variety of different analytics projects in many different markets. I knew a very bright individual who had a PHD in applied mathematics and she had incredible data insight.

 

Re: Male domination
  • 4/22/2014 9:47:23 AM
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Hi Maryam, I tend to think of data scientist as a newer role, and not too common yet so I have to wonder whether the "data scientists" you encounter day to day would meet Burtch Works' definition of a data scientist. These would be people who have degrees in a quantititive field of study like computer science, applied mathematics, or economics; are proficient in using big-data tools like Hadoop, Pig, and Hive; can program using languages like Python and Java;  know how to work with unstructured data; and know how to use analytics software like R and SAS -- plus have familiarity with methods like pattern recognition, signal processing, and visualization. Whew! Are these the sorts of people you're encountering? If so, I'd love to know what sorts of projects they're working on!

Male domination
  • 4/22/2014 1:11:53 AM
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While I have met allot of male data scientists I have also worked with allot of female data professionals so I am not sure that the 88% represents the individuals I have worked with day to day. I have worked with a majority of data scientists that were foreign born as indicated in the study, so I wonder if our academic focus in schools is not presenting data fields a career option for students early in their career

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