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Feds Slowly Phasing In Big Data for Security
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Re: Good on paper...
  • 4/28/2014 12:42:23 PM
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Good question Lyndon. I'll be in Frankfurt for Analytics 2014 in June. Maybe I'll come away with some insight on how European governmental agencies are addressing these challenges. If so, I'll be sure to share it.

Re: Good on paper...
  • 4/28/2014 8:13:23 AM
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That is a very good question but I wonder how cultural differences might change the way the problems are addressed.  Some cultures value simplicity or efficiency over growing so big that you can't be done away with.  Other governments also have much different pasts and still have to work around centuries old establishments we don't have to deal with.

Re: Good on paper...
  • 4/26/2014 8:12:26 AM
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..

Michael writes


I think the goals are noble, but as long as there are dozens of different agencies throwing varying amounts of money and a mix of technologies at the problem, we'll never achieve a cohesive solution. I realize that unifying federal IT is unrealistic. Cutting down the plethora of options and setting up a team dedicated to interoperability might be smart moves if Uncle Sam really wants to create a safer world


 

Other major governments elsewhere (European governments, EU, Japan, Australia, Canada, etc.) must be facing a similar problem. I wonder how they're addressing it.

 

Re: Good on paper...
  • 4/25/2014 11:15:42 AM
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Most definitely there is change for the better, and it does seem to greater in the local government sectors. I suppose the federal dinosaurs can't help but take notice.

Re: Good on paper...
  • 4/25/2014 8:51:28 AM
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So I guess now I have to ask why can't we expect them to work this way?  We allow them to work in that bubble, if we don't like it then it can be changed we just need the right people put in place to stop the business as usual attitude.   My local government managed to do some of this years ago when they took over an abandoned shopping center and pulled what were 3 different functions into the same facility.  Now you have the property appraiser , DMV and Clerk of the Court all in one location sharing services.  Before the change they were all more than a mile from each other and had their own little fiefdoms. 

Re: Good on paper...
  • 4/24/2014 11:48:06 AM
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Government agencies cannot be compared to private enterprises. They exist in a bubble of sorts, insulated from the market pressures that govern viability and survival. But there seems to be a push to more accountability fiscally as well as functional effectiveness. At least, it has been expressed more forcefully by the current administration. Hope spring eternal!

Re: Good on paper...
  • 4/24/2014 7:21:28 AM
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Yes, that is more or less my point, a little collaboration in place or competition would get us some nicer stuff.  Many of us have to do this every day in the corporate world, why should government budgets be any different?  We know that there is a lot of crossover between government functions so why not take advantage of that.  This security initiative is a good example, if one department has an excellent data set and gets very good at working with that data because they have the budget does that mean they should keep everything to themselves and ensure they keep getting the budget dollars or should they open it up to similar departments and use their resources too rather than every department reinventing the wheel?

Re: Good on paper...
  • 4/23/2014 1:05:34 PM
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SaneIT, the moneys come from the same pot, however in the budgeting process, competition drives for greater share of that pie. They see it as, one's gain is another's loss. It's a game in itself, which makes collaboration tricky.

Re: Good on paper...
  • 4/23/2014 8:26:59 AM
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This doesn't surprise me at all, luckily I've never had to do any work with government entities.  I know it would drive me insane because I didn't enjoy the politics inside the two Fortune 500 companies I have worked for.  One was a mess of red tape any time someone wanted me to venture outside of the little box my department was assigned to and the other was full of outright internal espionage.  The issue I have with government fragmentation though is that their budget all comes from the same place and it's not like the individual entities are making money so in my mind they should be doing what they can to pool resources.

Re: Good on paper...
  • 4/22/2014 8:39:53 PM
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Fragmentation is the result of the prevalent culture shared by most if not all government agencies. They operate as mini kingdoms protecting their turf from any erosion of power. They are resistant to collaborating and sharing any resources. That being said, the climate is changing and hopefully it will breakdown the walls for effective and uniformed implementation.

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