Comments
IT & Analytics: Stepping Up to the Challenge
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Re: Are you kidding?
  • 4/28/2014 12:31:27 PM
NO RATINGS

Absolutely, Jeff -- access power in the wrong hands can go so horribly wrong. Do you recall the case, several years old now, of net admin in San Francisco who locked out access to the city's network? That's a classic example.

Are you kidding?
  • 4/28/2014 12:11:52 PM
NO RATINGS

I've thought about this issue.  So when business' started getting hit by viruses and the web site/systems started to go down and cost millions of dollars, management said to IT;  make it work and don't let anyone take it down external or INTERNAL. So the ovrriding theories of authorization and authentication became 'give users only what they really need access to.'  Who had to ask this question?  The network admin. (or DBA)  Why? because he/she held the keys to all the data.  

So what did I just describe?  Power.  Given over freely by management to IT.  But did management keep tabs on these newly empowered geeks?  I say this power landed in the wrong hands in some cases.  

I worked with an admin who, after meetings was more likely to pull access rights to certain people/departments, than to grant new rights.  His reasoning seemed dubious in some instances to me.  My question was always the same, are you kidding?  He would argue this limited access nonsense I've described, and I would quietly hope for a regime change.

Re: IT's larger problem
  • 4/28/2014 11:00:34 AM
NO RATINGS

Hospice, no doubt that IT enables and facilitates processes that are crucial and innovative. The questions that sometimes arise have more to do with its nimbleness and flexibility to adapt and incorporate ever changing requirements from other than familiar disciplines.

Re: IT's larger problem
  • 4/27/2014 11:05:42 PM
NO RATINGS

@rbaz: I think that IT hasn't failed in its role as an innovation enabler. People may have various reasons to desagree, but we can't rule out that recent breakthroughs in analytics are mostly due to IT contribution. IT is the core of all the processes involved in Business Analytics that deal with data gathering, storing and filtering, before the data can be analyzed for business insight. 

Re: IT's larger problem
  • 4/27/2014 10:37:13 AM
NO RATINGS

@kq4ym, One would hope leadership would have solved that issue at many companies a long time ago, but that doesnt seem to be too high on the priority list for some reason. I could never figure out why. 

Re: IT's larger problem
  • 4/27/2014 8:51:53 AM
NO RATINGS

A very common problem, lack of integration among departments.  It's a classic in the marketing world where sales folks aren't in the loop with marketing. Now it's become the same problem with IT and analytics. Eventually, one would hope leadership will be able to come up with systems to keep everyone on the same page and let all interact freely in new projects.

Re: IT's larger problem
  • 4/25/2014 3:35:02 PM
NO RATINGS

@Terry, 

Thats a great point and one I have seen all too often where an IT departments becomes unplsent to work with and forget that part of their mission is to support other employees. 

Re: IT's larger problem
  • 4/23/2014 9:03:04 PM
NO RATINGS

I really liked the reference to IT not be the gatekeeper but the facilitator to innovation. To me that speaks to the core. How it came to be is debatable, but no doubt a remake is crucial for the benefit of all.

IT's larger problem
  • 4/23/2014 6:45:08 PM
NO RATINGS

This isn't true of all all IT departments (or maybe even most of them), but there's a culture of contempt among some IT professionals, whether for clueless users or for other technically-savvy professionals elsewhere in the organization who threaten/annoy/undermine the IT department's authority. If IT is viewed as an obstacle or as something to be avoided/worked around, then IT has only itself to blame.



INFORMATION RESOURCES
ANALYTICS IN ACTION
CARTERTOONS
VIEW ALL +
QUICK POLL
VIEW ALL +